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J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXX. September, 1863 (search)
complains that these guards were made prisoners by our troops, and, if exchanges be demanded for them, he fears the next time the hostile army approaches Richmond, their request for a guard will be refused. What answer the Secretary will make to this, I have no means of conjecturing; but Mr. Hubbard recommends him to come to some understanding with the enemy for the mutual protection of the persons and property of non-combating civilians; and he desires an answer directed to the care of Col. Shingler, who, indeed, captured the guard. The Secretary consented to the exchange. September 6 Northern papers received yesterday evening contain a letter from Mr. Lincoln to the Illinois Convention of Republicans, in which I am told (I have not seen it yet) he says if the Southern people will first lay down their arms, he will then listen to what they may have to say. Evidently he has been reading of the submission of Jack Cade's followers, who were required to signify their submission w
appearance of having had a ball in his temple, and he said he had been insensible from the effects, but he hoped soon to be upon the field again. A few steps further on I saw a Palmetto boy with his under jaw shot off at the instant. I met Col. Shingler, riding before an ambulance, which, he said, contained the late lamented Gen. Bee. The General lay prostrate, and almost expiring, from the wound in his abdomen, which of necessity must prove mortal. A few steps further still, and there layontest. He was present at the passage of the turnpike; at the gallant charge of the Hampton Legion; at the storming of the batteries; and at last fell near the fatal spot where also had fallen the gallant Bartow. Of his aids were Gen. Gist, Col. Shingler, and Major Stevens, who was slightly wounded, shared his pains, and remained to the further fortune of the contest. Nor is less sympathy experienced for the sufferings of Gen. Smith. He came to stem the current of our backward fortunes, a
se his battalion of artillery to the best advantage. Colonel Boyken's regiment of cavalry will move in conjunction with Hoke's division, so as to protect his left flank. He will receive more definite instructions from Major-General Hoke. Colonel Shingler's regiment of cavalry will move with the reserve division. The division commanded by Brigadier-General Colquitt will constitute the reserve, and will to-night form in column, by brigades, in rear of Hoke's present position, the centre ofn from Petersburg, along the Petersburg and Richmond Turnpike, and attack the enemy, flank and rear. The movements above indicated must be made with all possible vigor and celerity. The Generals commanding divisions, and Colonels Baker and Shingler, commanding cavalry, will report at these headquarters at 6 h. P. M. to-day. In the mean time they will give all necessary instructions for providing their respective commands with sixty rounds of ammunition issued to each man, and at least twe
t-up. Laminating-machine.Shafting. Lap.Shaft-straightener. Larget.Shaping-machine. Lathe.Shearing and punching machine. Lead-pipe. Lead-shaving.Sheet-iron. Leveling-block.Sheet-metal bender. Lever-punch.Sheet-metal cutter and folder. Lubricator.Sheet-metal die. Machine-tool.Sheet-metal folder. Mandrel.Sheet-metal forming machine. Marking-machine.Sheet-metal polisher. Metal-bending machine.Sheet-metal scourer. Metal-drawing machine.Sheet-metal straightener. Mill.Shim. Milling.Shingler. Milling-machine.Shingling-hammer. Milling-tool.Shot-making. Mold.Shrunk-on. Mold-blocking machine.Skelp. Molding.Skelp-bender. Mowing-machine grinderSledge. Muck-roll.Slide-rest. Mullar.Slitting-machine. Nail-head tool.Slotting-machine. Nail-machine.Snap. Nail-plate clamp.Soldering. Nail-plate feeder.Soldering-iron. Nail-plate shears.Spherical-shot machine. Needle.Spike-machine. Needle-making machine.Spinning-metal. Nippers.Spring-coiling machine. Nurling.Spring-polisher.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
se his battalion of artillery to the best advantage. Colonel Baker's regiment of cavalry will move in conjunction with Hoke's division, so as to protect his right flank. He will receive more definite instructions from Major General Hoke. Colonel Shingler's regiment of cavalry will move with the reserve division. The division commanded by Brigadier-General Colquitt will constitute the reserve, and will, to-night, form in column, by brigades, in rear of Hoke's present position, the centre on from Petersburg along the Petersburg and Richmond turnpike, and attack the enemy in flank and rear. The movement above indicated must be made with all possible vigor and celerity. The Generals commanding divisions, and Colonels Baker and Shingler, commanding cavalry will report at these headquarters at 6 P. M., to-day. In the meantime, they will give all neccessary instructions for providing their respective commands with sixty rounds of ammunition issued to each man, and at least twent
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The career of Wise's Brigade, 1861-5. (search)
orward that night, and we attacked the redoubts in front with 900 men at daybreak the next morning. The plan succeeded gloriously, in destroying from $300,000 to $500,000 worth of stores and their quarters at Whitaker's Mill, without the loss of a man. We occupied Williamsburg and vicinity for about a week in face of an enemy in our front three times our number; relieved many of the inhabitants of their durance vile; saved much property, and avenged somewhat the outrages which had followed Shingler's raid, and returned to Chaffin's to meet the thanks of the War Department and of General Elzey. Tabb and Page and Captain Rives, with a section of artillery, especially met my commendation. After this, in September, 1863, this brigade was ordered to report to General Beauregard at Charleston, South Carolina. Whilst at Chaffin's Bluff, its men and officers began to chafe somewhat that they were not put into a service where more laurels and less hard service could be gained. But there
South Carolina State Convention. Charleston, March 26. --The State Convention of South Carolina met to-day. Mr. Shingler offered a resolution that all supplies of provisions and mail facilities now allowed Major Anderson and garrison Sumter should be immediately cut off. Ordered for consideration to-morrow. There will be some discussion on the Constitution of the Confederate States, but it will be ratified by a large majority. It is the general impression that Mr. ShinglCharleston, March 26. --The State Convention of South Carolina met to-day. Mr. Shingler offered a resolution that all supplies of provisions and mail facilities now allowed Major Anderson and garrison Sumter should be immediately cut off. Ordered for consideration to-morrow. There will be some discussion on the Constitution of the Confederate States, but it will be ratified by a large majority. It is the general impression that Mr. Shingler's resolution will be voted down.
umpter, and mentioned the cause of the resignation of Secretary Cars. At Fort Moultrie there were only 65 men, with five or six musicians. Major Anderson is needful of troops. He felt the necessity when the excitement first broke out, of being watchful, lost a few persons from Charleston should surprise him in the night. All the repairs now being made will be to our advantage. The blank in the resolution appointing the committee was, on motion of Mr. Harlee, filled with "13" Mr. Shingler moved to insert "Debt of the United States." The resolution, as it stands, seems to be one-sided. Mr. Harlee moved to lay the motion on the table, which was carried, and the resolution was then adopted. Mr. De Treville's resolutions for a Committee of Safety were transferred for the special order of to-morrow. Mr. Memminger moved the appointment of a committee of seven to draft a summary statement of the causes justifying South Carolina in withdrawing from the Union.--He sa
open field. Our forces were immediately drawn up in line to attack them, and the order given to charge. This was too much for the timid Yankees, and after a volley or two from their carbines they fled from the field in confusion, leaving more dead and wounded to the care of our men. They were pursued to their camps, which they quickly deserted, and only stopped when they had found shelter in Fort Magruder, some distance below Williamsburg. Our forces were under the command of Colonel Shingler, of the "Holcombe Legion." Our loss in the fight was too killed and five or six wounded; that of the enemy not less than sixty killed and wounded. Besides these, our forces captured 110 Yankees and 16 contrabands; also, 71 horses and some 20 or 25 carbines. Among the prisoners was one Colonel and the Military Governor of Williamsburg, named Campbell. The prisoners captured were brought to this city last night under charge of Serg'ts Thorne and Dickens, of the Legion, and are now
enemy. I will write again soon, and give you any additional news. A free negro spy, who was arrested by our pickets at The Forge, was brought to this city yesterday by Mr. O. F. Taylor. The negro states that a force of about 2,000 Federal infantry, with artillery and cavalry, was encamped four miles this side of Williamsburg. Our scouts, on Wednesday, saw two Federal soldiers up as high as Barhamsville, 18 miles this side of Williamsburg. The Yankees ran off. Mr. Taylor, on his way up, saw 14 Virginians who had escaped from the Eastern Shore. They describe the Yankee rule there as very oppressive, though the force there is not very large. In noticing the battle of Williamsburg, it should have been stated that the charge made by our troopers on the Yankees at their last stand was led by Col. Shingler in person. A lady, who recently passed through the lines from Williamsburg, says that the Yankees acknowledge a loss of 200 in killed and wounded at the fight there.
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