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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 14: battle and capture of Fort Henry by the Navy. (search)
; Carondelet, 13 gulls Com. Walke, on the left of the Cincinnati; and the St. Louis, 13 guns, Lieut. Paulding, on the left of all. The Conestoga (wooden), 3 guns, Lieut. Phelps; Taylor (wooden). 9 guns, Lieut. Gwin; Lexington (wooden), 9 guns, Lieut. Shirk. These vessels all told mounted 76 guns; but as they were obliged to fight bow on and could therefore only use their bow guns, there were only twelve guns brought into action by the iron-clads and five or six by the wooden vessels, which weret Assistant Engineer; George D. Simms, Second Assistant Engineer; Jeremiah Wetzel, Third Assistant Engineer; S. B. Brittan, Master's Mate; Matthias B. Snyder, Gunner; Thomas Steel, Carpenter;---Fletcher, Armorer. Gun-boat Lexington. James W. Shirk, U. S. N., Lieutenant Commanding; Jacob S. Hurd, First Master; Martin Dunn, Second Master; James Fitzpatrick, Third Master; Sylvester Poole, Fourth Master; James McCamant, Pilot; William Ford, Pilot; George W. Garver, Assistant Surgeon; Augus
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 15: capture of Fort Donelson and battle of Shiloh. (search)
eut. Phelps, had pushed on up the Tennessee as far as Florence, Alabama, greatly alarming the inhabitants, but carrying comfort to the loyal citizens, who were glad to see the old flag floating over their waters. When about twenty-five miles above the fort, Phelps found the draw at the railroadcrossing closed, and the machinery for working it disabled, but men were landed, in an hour the draw was opened, and the following gun-boats passed through: Taylor, Lieut.-Com.Gwin; Lexington, Lieut.-Com. Shirk, and the Conestoga, Lieut.-Com. Phelps. In a short time this flotilla caused the enemy to abandon and burn three steam transports, filled with military stores, submarine batteries, powder, cannon and projectiles. These vessels exploded with such force as to endanger the Union gun-boats. Skylights were broken, doors forced open and the light upper decks raised bodily. This did not stop the progress of the latter, however, and they proceeded up the river, doing good work in breakin
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 16: operations on the Mississippi. (search)
of March Lieut.-Com. Gwin learned that the enemy were fortifying Pittsburg Landing, and proceeded up the river in the Taylor, followed by the Lexington, Lieut.-Com. James W. Shirk. When within 1,200 yards of the landing the gun-boats were fired on by the Confederate batteries, consisting of six or eight fieldpieces, some of them orth Carolina and Virginia. With the Cumberland and the Tennessee Rivers, and all the railroads in the Union possession, the rebellion would have been Commander James W. Shirk. confined to the other States, and the resources of Tennessee would have been lost to the Confederate cause. It would have been better to have thrown thH. Walke; Cincinnati, Commander R. N. Stembel; St. Louis, Lieut.-Commanding L. Paulding; Pittsburgh, Lieut.-Commanding E. Thompson; Lexington, Lieut.-Commanding J. W. Shirk, with four transports, each having five mortar-boats in tow; also a magazine boat and a provision boat. The squadron was accompanied by troops under General Bu
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 24: Second attack on Vicksburg, etc. (search)
In the meantime the transports steamed down the river in good order leaving nothing behind that could be of any use to the enemy. The following named vessels took part in the Yazoo expedition: Black Hawk, (flagship) Lieutenant-Commander K. R. Breese, Benton, Lieutenant-Commander Wm. Gwinn, Baron DeKalb, Lieutenant-Commander Jno. G. Walker, Carondelet, Commander Henry Walke, Louisville, Lieutenant-Commander E. K. Owen, Cincinnati, Lieutenant-Commander G. M. Bache, Lexington, Lieutenant-Commander James W. Shirk, Signal, Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant John Scott, Romeo, Acting-Ensign R. B. Smith, Juliet, Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant Edward Shaw, Forest Rose, Acting-Master Geo. W. Brown, Rattler. Lieutenant-Commander Watson Smith, Marmora, Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant Robert Getty, Monarch, (ram) Queen of the West, (ram) Colonel Chas. Ellet, Jr. The second attack on Vicksburg terminated quite as unsatisfactorily as the first, and every one came to the conclusion that Vicksburg could only
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 25: capture of Fort Hindman or Arkansas Post. (search)
attack, all the gun-boats were beautifully handled and not much injured; the success of the-afternoon gave good promise for the morrow. The Lexington, Lieutenant Commander Shirk, held a position 400 yards below the forts, and although pretty well cut up had no casualties. General McClernand's report that General Sherman had ahey started out with; moreover, the officers had learned that the way to fight these batteries was at close quarters. Lieutenant-Commanders Walker, Owen, Bache, Shirk, Watson, Smith, Woodworth, Breese, and the commander of the Monarch were all handsomely mentioned by Casemate no. 2 destroyed by the U. S. Gun-boat Louisville. Ackerman, James Vanzant, G. W. Heisel and G. W. Aiken; Acting-Gunner, Reuben Applegate; Acting-Carpenter, James Kirkland. Steamer Lexington. Lieutenant-Commander, James W. Shirk; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, Martin Dunn; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, L. M. Reese; Assistant Paymaster, Geo. A. Lyon; Acting-Master, James Fitzpatri
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 28: passage of the fleet by Vicksburg and capture of Grand Gulf.--capture of Alexandria, etc. (search)
off side of the iron-clad Lafayette. When all was ready the signal was made to get under way and the squadron started in the following order: Benton (flag-ship) Lieutenant-Commander James A. Greer; Lafayette, Commander Henry Walke; General Price, Lieutenant-Commander Selim Woodworth; Louisville, Lieutenant-Commander E. K. Owen; Mound City, Lieutenant-Commander Byron Wilson; Pittsburg, Volunteer-Lieutenant Hoel; Carondelet. Lieutenant-Commander J. McL. Murphy, and Tuscumbia. Lieutenant-Commander J. W. Shirk. The tug Ivy was lashed to the Benton, three army transports were in the rear and the Tuscumbia was at the end of the line to take care of them. The Benton, passed the first battery without receiving a shot, but as she came up with the second. the railroad station on the right bank of the river was set on fire, and tar barrels were lighted all along the Vicksburg shore, illuminating the river and showing every object as plainly as if it was daylight. Then the enemy opened
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 29: siege of Vicksburg--continued. (search)
and energy displayed by Lieutenant-Commander Fitch, Captain Pennock and Lieutenant-Commander Phelps, General Rosecrans would have been left without provisions. To Captain Walke, Commander Woodworth, Lieutenant-Commanders Breese, Foster, Greer, Shirk, Owen, Wilson, Walker, Bache, Murphy, Selfridge, Prichett, Ramsay and Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant Hoel, I feel much indebted for their active and energetic attention to all my orders, and their ready co-operation with the Army corps commanders, at all times, which enabled them to carry out their plans successfully. The Benton, Lieutenant-Commander Greer, Mound City, Lieutenant Byron Wilson, Tuscumbia, Lieutenant-Commander Shirk. Carondelet, Acting Lieutenant Murphy, and the Sterling Price, Commander Woodworth, have been almost constantly under fire of the batteries at Vicksburg since the forty-five days siege commenced. The attack of the 22d of May, by the Benton, Mound City, Carondelet and Tuscumbia on all the water batteries, in
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 30: (search)
and Oliver Bragg; Gunner, N. B. Willetts; Carpenter, R. Blackford. Hospital-ship Red Rover. Acting-Master, W. R. Welles; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, A. N. Pearson; Acting-Ensign, Wm. Harris; Acting-Master's Mates, C. King and F. Lowe; Engineers, W. J. Buffington, G. W. Gimbeo, W. O. Logne, Julius Eliter and J. A. Goodloe; Acting-Carpenter, H. Kenney; Acting-Assistant Surgeons, George H. Bixby and George Hopkins (Jan. 1864). Iron-clad steamer Tuscumbia. *Lieutenant-Commander, James W. Shirk; Assistant Paymaster, George A. Lyon; Acting-Ensigns, Lewis Kenny and E. M. Clark; Engineers, John W. Hartupee, Perry South and William J. Milligan. Tug Ivy. Acting-Ensign, E. C. Boss; Acting-Master's Mate, S. H. Carson; Engineers, A. Miller and E. Callahan. Steamer W. H. Brown (4th rate). Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, J. A. French; Acting-Ensign, J. B. Hawthorne; Acting-Master's Mates, Jacob Shinn and William Cassidy; Engineers, G. L. Scott and Geo. W. Taylor. Tug Laurel.
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 42: Red River expedition.--continued. (search)
ttant Paymaster, D. L. Ruth; Acting-Ensigns, H. A. Coffenberry, Chas. Nelson, Henry Harkins, G. V. Mead, R. H. Longlands, Frank Bates and J. T. Blackford; Acting-Master's Mates, J. J. Drew, Chas. Smith, Jr., and C. S. Scanlan; Engineers: Acting-Chief, J. B. Fulton; Acting-First-Assistant, J. J. Hardy; Acting-Second-Assistant, C. W. Reynolds; Acting-Third-Assistant, C. F. Degelman; Acting-Gunner, William Shields; Acting-Carpenter, D. H. Curry. Iron-clad steamer Tuscumbia. Lieutenant-Commander, James W. Shirk; Assistant Paymaster, Geo. A. Lyon; Acting-Ensigns, Lewis Kenney and E. M. Clark; Engineers: Acting-Chief, J. W. Hartuper; Acting-First-Assistant, Perry South; Acting-Second-Assistant, W. J. Milligan. Iron-clad steamer Choctaw. Lieutenant-Commander, F. M. Ramsey; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, Wm. N. Whitehouse; Acting-Master, W. A. Griswold; Acting-Ensigns, Ezra Beaman, W. C. Bennett, A. S. Palmer and L. R. Hamersly; Acting-Master's Mates, T. Hopkins and Henry Marsh; Engin