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Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies., Chapter 9: the last review. (search)
igration of souls: having lived and moved in different bodies and under different names; knowing, too, the tests of manhood, and the fate of suffering and sacrifice, but knowing most of all the undying spirit which holds fast its loyalty and faces ever forward. This is the division of Mott, himself commanding to-day, although severely wounded at Hatcher's Run on the sixth of April last. These are all that are left of the old commands of Hooker and Kearny, and later, of our noble Berry, of Sickles' Third Corps. They still wear the proud Kearny patch --the red diamond. Birney's Division, too, has been consolidated with Mott's, and the brigades are now commanded by the chivalrous De Trobriand and the sterling soldiers, Pierce of Michigan and McAllister of New Jersey. Their division flag now bears the mingled symbols of the two corps, the Second and Third,--the diamond and the trefoil. Over them far floats the mirage-like vision of them on the Peninsula, and then at Bristow, Man
Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States, July, 1863. (search)
morning was evidently to be occupied in disposing the troops for the attack, I rode to the extreme right with Colonel Manning and Major Walton, where we ate quantities of cherries, and got a feed of corn for our horses. We also bathed in a small stream, but not without some trepidation on my part, for we were almost beyond the lines, and were exposed to the enemy's cavalry. At 1 P. M. I met a quantity of Yankee prisoners who had been picked up straggling. They told me they belonged to Sickles's corps (3d, I think), and had arrived from Emmetsburg during the night. About this time skirmishing began along part of the line, but not heavily. At 2 P. M. General Longstreet advised me, if I wished to have a good view of the battle, to return to my tree of yesterday. I did so, and remained there with Lawley and Captain Schreibert during the rest of the afternoon. But until 4.45 P. M. all was profoundly still, andwe began to doubt whether a fight was coming off to-day at all. At t
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 45: exchange of prisoners and Andersonville. (search)
was the fixed purpose of the Confederate Government, is evidenced by the treatment accorded to them as long as our necessities enabled us to minister to their comfort. In the second year of the war the Herald's correspondent wrote from Harrison's Landing, July 22, 1862 : Several surgeons, left behind in care of our sick and wounded men in the hospitals, have arrived here, and report quite favorably their treatment by the Rebels. Father Hagan, Chaplain of the Excelsior Regiment, Sickles's brigade, visited the hospitals and found our wounded men receiving the same attention as their own. All the sick in Richmond-our prisoners with the others — are suffering from scarcity of medicines, and the Confederates complain bitterly of the action of our Government in declaring medicines contraband of war. Quinine is worth sixty dollars an ounce in Richmond, in New York five dollars or less. Who, then, took the initiative? Did not the North do so in making quinine contraband of w
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Causes of the Confederate defeat at Gettysburg. (search)
without being seen, but the collision that took place made the presence of Confederates in it known to the enemy, and it may have been this knowledge that caused Sickles to advance his line so as to rest its right along the Emmettsburg pike. McLaws was opposite Sickles' right; the left of his corps rested at Round Top, a mile or Sickles' right; the left of his corps rested at Round Top, a mile or more to our right, and near the left of the Union army, its right being to the east and north of Culps' Hill. McLaws advanced about 6 P. M., and while engaged in a close musketry fight with Sickles, two brigades of AndersOn's division, Wilcox's and Perry's, assailed him in flank and rear, breaking his line at once, and forcing it Sickles, two brigades of AndersOn's division, Wilcox's and Perry's, assailed him in flank and rear, breaking his line at once, and forcing it back with loss and in confusion. Further to the right he fared no better, and his entire corps was driven back to the Ridge in rear. He had been in the meantime heavily reinforced, but all were driven back. The Sixth corps came upon the field at the close of the battle; but one of its brigades became engaged. Longstreet's attac
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Leading Confederates on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
the Third corps not having yet reported; but I suppose that it is marching up: If so, his flank will in a degree protect our left flank. Con. Rep., 357. General Sickles, commanding the Third corps, in his testimony, says: I, therefore, moved to Gettysburg on my own responsibility. I made a forced march, and arrived thereed it, it would have involved a bloody struggle, and then to find Buford to. check our further progress, and the Twelfth corps, under Slocum, and the Third, under Sickles, coming on the ground. What might have been the result of that conjuncture may well be imagined. Slocum and Sickles were both up before Johnson arrived, and at Sickles were both up before Johnson arrived, and at least one of Slocum's divisions had taken position immediately in rear of Culp's Hill, which it was designed Johnson should take. Before Johnson arrived all thought of moving on Cemetery Hill that afternoon had been abandoned, as it was then evident that the enemy had rallied from the dismay of his defeat. The most that the ca
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Supplement to General Early's Review.-reply to General Longstreet. (search)
unnecessary repetition. On page 332, in describing the attack on Sickles, Meade says: At the same time that they threw immense masses on SiSickles' corps, a heavy column was thrown upon the Round Top Mountain, which was the key-point of my whole position. If they had succeeded in ing any of the ground which I subsequently held to the last. That Sickles did not occupy. the position assaulted by General Longstreet unti out with General Meade to examine the left. of our line, where Gen. Sickles was. His troops could hardly be said to be in position. On page 332, Meade.says he arrived on the ground where Sickles was, a few minutes before 4 o'clock in the afternoon. That Round Top was unoccupied ttack from that flank-Hancock's corps connected with Howard's, and Sickles was on the left of Hancock, but he did not go into position until ver, not extending to Round Top, probably only about half way. General Sickles was directed to connect with my left and the Round Top Mountai
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Leading Confederates on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
each orchard, on a piece of elevated ground that General Lee desired me to take and hold for his artillery, was the Third corps of the Federals, commanded by General Sickles. My men charged with great spirit and dislodged the Federals from the peach orchard with but little delay, though they fought stubbornly. We were then on thtreeteven though it threatened to pierce and annihilate the Third corps, against which it was directed, drew forth cries of admiration from all who beheld it. General Sickles and his splendid command, withstood the shock with a determination that checked but could not fully restrain it. Back, inch by inch, fighting, falling, dying, cheering, the men retired. The rebels came on more furiously, halting at intervals, pouring volleys that struck our troops down in scores. General Sickles, fighting desperately, was struck in the leg and fell. The Second corps came to the aid of his decimated column. The battle then grew fearful. Standing firmly up against th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A review of the First two days operations at Gettysburg and a reply to General Longstreet by General Fitz. Lee. (search)
uld have been made to hold the position until the troops of the Third and Second corps could be brought up. Although General Sickles reached the field at an earlier hour, only two brigades of his command arrived that night-these reaching the field aps in addition to the 1,200 mentioned by General Hancock. opposed to our 26,000. Birney's division of the Third corps (Sickles) were the next troops to arrive; they came up about sunset, less one brigade left at Emmettsburg, and numbered, at that f the War, page 428,) moved across Rock Creek, was massed and held in reserve, where it lay until called upon to support Sickles in the afternoon, when its place was taksn by the Sixth corps, which arrived at 3 P. M., having marched 32 miles since 9cept one regiment of Lockwood's brigade, Sixth corps, whose movements have been previously given. At about 11 A. M. General Sickles ordered a reconnaissance, and at 12, advaneed his command and occupied the intermediate ridge, extending his line to
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Longstreet's Second paper on Gettysburg. (search)
esistance of the Third corps, under Major-General. Birney (Major-General Sickles having been wounded early in the action), superiority of nutuation on the morning of the 2d. During the night of the 1st General Sickles rested with the Third corps upon the ground lying between Geneorps occupying part of the same line. General Meade had given General Sickles orders to occupy Round Top if it were practicable; and in reply to his question as to what sort of position it was, General Sickles had answered, There is no position there. At the first signs of activity in our ranks on the 2d General Sickles became apprehensive that we were about to attack him, and so reported to General Meade. As our movtime to see the battle open. It will be seen, therefore, that General Sickles' move, and all the movements of the Federal left, were simply this position until the battle had finally opened. He had ordered Sickles to occupy it if practicable ; but it was not occupied in force whe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reply to General Longstreet's Second paper. (search)
g of the 2d. During the night of the 1st General Sickles rested with the Third corps upon the grouf the same line. General Meade had given General Sickles orders to occupy Round Top if it were prastion as to what sort of position it was, General Sickles had answered, There is no position there.signs of activity in our ranks on the 2d, General Sickles became apprehensive that we were about toe open. It will be seen, therefore, that General Sickles' move, and all the movements of the Federf a sunrise attack. In his testimony, General Sickles says: At a very early hour on Thurson was removed very early in the morning, and Sickles' corps remained on that flank, alone, until lansferring troops to meet such an attack, and Sickles did not go into position until near 4 o'clockre four o'clock in the afternoon, I found General Sickles had taken a position very much in advancede to examine the left of our line, where General Sickles was. His troops could hardly be said to b
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