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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Leading Confederates on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
each orchard, on a piece of elevated ground that General Lee desired me to take and hold for his artillery, was the Third corps of the Federals, commanded by General Sickles. My men charged with great spirit and dislodged the Federals from the peach orchard with but little delay, though they fought stubbornly. We were then on thtreeteven though it threatened to pierce and annihilate the Third corps, against which it was directed, drew forth cries of admiration from all who beheld it. General Sickles and his splendid command, withstood the shock with a determination that checked but could not fully restrain it. Back, inch by inch, fighting, falling, dying, cheering, the men retired. The rebels came on more furiously, halting at intervals, pouring volleys that struck our troops down in scores. General Sickles, fighting desperately, was struck in the leg and fell. The Second corps came to the aid of his decimated column. The battle then grew fearful. Standing firmly up against th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A review of the First two days operations at Gettysburg and a reply to General Longstreet by General Fitz. Lee. (search)
uld have been made to hold the position until the troops of the Third and Second corps could be brought up. Although General Sickles reached the field at an earlier hour, only two brigades of his command arrived that night-these reaching the field aps in addition to the 1,200 mentioned by General Hancock. opposed to our 26,000. Birney's division of the Third corps (Sickles) were the next troops to arrive; they came up about sunset, less one brigade left at Emmettsburg, and numbered, at that f the War, page 428,) moved across Rock Creek, was massed and held in reserve, where it lay until called upon to support Sickles in the afternoon, when its place was taksn by the Sixth corps, which arrived at 3 P. M., having marched 32 miles since 9cept one regiment of Lockwood's brigade, Sixth corps, whose movements have been previously given. At about 11 A. M. General Sickles ordered a reconnaissance, and at 12, advaneed his command and occupied the intermediate ridge, extending his line to
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Longstreet's Second paper on Gettysburg. (search)
esistance of the Third corps, under Major-General. Birney (Major-General Sickles having been wounded early in the action), superiority of nutuation on the morning of the 2d. During the night of the 1st General Sickles rested with the Third corps upon the ground lying between Geneorps occupying part of the same line. General Meade had given General Sickles orders to occupy Round Top if it were practicable; and in reply to his question as to what sort of position it was, General Sickles had answered, There is no position there. At the first signs of activity in our ranks on the 2d General Sickles became apprehensive that we were about to attack him, and so reported to General Meade. As our movtime to see the battle open. It will be seen, therefore, that General Sickles' move, and all the movements of the Federal left, were simply this position until the battle had finally opened. He had ordered Sickles to occupy it if practicable ; but it was not occupied in force whe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reply to General Longstreet's Second paper. (search)
g of the 2d. During the night of the 1st General Sickles rested with the Third corps upon the grouf the same line. General Meade had given General Sickles orders to occupy Round Top if it were prastion as to what sort of position it was, General Sickles had answered, There is no position there.signs of activity in our ranks on the 2d, General Sickles became apprehensive that we were about toe open. It will be seen, therefore, that General Sickles' move, and all the movements of the Federf a sunrise attack. In his testimony, General Sickles says: At a very early hour on Thurson was removed very early in the morning, and Sickles' corps remained on that flank, alone, until lansferring troops to meet such an attack, and Sickles did not go into position until near 4 o'clockre four o'clock in the afternoon, I found General Sickles had taken a position very much in advancede to examine the left of our line, where General Sickles was. His troops could hardly be said to b