Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Sickles or search for Sickles in all documents.

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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—Richmond. (search)
have been able to enter Richmond with then. The combat of the 1st of June, in which but a few thousand men were engaged on either side, had notwithstanding the proportions of a great battle. On the left it was marked by a brilliant charge of Sickles' brigade along the railway track; on the right by a sharp encounter between an Irish brigade in the Federal service, commanded by General Meagher, and Pickett's troops. Before noon the Federal outposts took possession without a blow of the worklast about to penetrate the very centre of their adversaries, and of the formidable artillery which but now was dealing destruction in their ranks. But Summer, who commands on the right, seeing no likelihood of any attack on that side, detaches Sickles' and Meagher's brigades successively to Couch's assistance. During this time Whiting on the left, and Huger on the right, suffer Hill's soldiers to become exhausted, without supporting them. Neither Lee nor Jackson has sent the slightest orde
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book VI:—Virginia. (search)
ember the Eleventh corps, which Siegel brought him, was at New Baltimore and Thoroughfare Gap; after this corps followed Sickles' division, which encamped that day at Manassas Junction and Warrenton Junction. The whole army thus extended from the p was to support Franklin in case of necessity should be added to the command of the latter. The divisions of Birney and Sickles, of Stoneman's corps, were, in fact, encamped on the left bank, fronting Smithfield, ready to pass over the bridge, whic been detached from Hooker's command, and stationed on the left bank for the purpose of supporting him in case of need. Sickles' division remained near the bridges, whilst that of Birney was sent to Meade's relief. About this time, a little beforeas almost annihilated, having had two hundred and twenty-four men disabled. In front of Hamilton's Crossing, Birney and Sickles had replaced Meade's and Gibbon's divisions, which had been placed in reserve to recover from their losses. The enemy's
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book VII:—politics. (search)
ers openly professed their sympathies in favor of slavery. We shall have many instances to record of open violations of this law, and at the very gates of Washington; less than a fortnight after Congress had passed the law, slave-owners from Maryland were seen to visit a Federal camp, provided with an order from General Hooker, to take away some slaves whom they suspected to have taken refuge in it. It is true that their presence caused a terrible commotion among the soldiers, and that General Sickles' conduct in driving them away, despite the order of his chief, was approved. In order to secure the execution of the will of Congress, however, even in the city of Washington it required a special order from General Doubleday, commanding the place, on the 6th of April, which recapitulated the several clauses of the law, and forbade officers from admitting to their camps the employes of the civil police engaged in the search of slaves, without a permit signed by himself. Being oblig
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), chapter 8 (search)
2d Division, Brigadier-general Hooker. Artillery. 1 Regular battery, 6 guns. Artillery. 3 Volunteer batteries, 16 guns. 1st Brigade (Excelsior), Brigadier-general Sickles, 5 regiments. 2d Brigade, Brigadier-general Naglee, 4 regiments. 3d Brigade, Colonel Starr, 4 regiments. 3d Division, Brigadier-general HamiltonSedgwick. 1st Brigade, Gorman; 2d Brigade, Burns; 3d Brigade, Abercrombie. 3d corps, Heintzelman; 18,810 men strong. 1st Division, Hooker. 1st Brigade, Sickles; 2d Brigade, Grover; 3d Brigade, Starr. 2d Division, Kearny. 1st Brigade, ......; 2d Brigade, Birney; 3d Brigade, Berry. 4th corps, Keyes, 14,610 men stench. 2d Division, Sedgwick. 1st Brigade, ......; 2d Brigade, Burns; 3d Brigade, Abercrombie. 3d corps, Heintzelman. 1st Division, Hooker. 1st Brigade, Sickles; 2d Brigade, Grover; 3d Brigade, Carr. 2d Division, Kearny. 1st Brigade, Robertson; 2d Brigade, Birney; 3d Brigade, Berry. 4th corps, Keyes. 1st Divis
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), chapter 9 (search)
.. Division, Brook. Brigade, ......; brigade, ......; brigade,...... Division, Howe. Vinton's brigade; brigade, .....; brigade...... Grand division of the centre, Major-general Hooker. 39,984 men, 100 guns. 5th corps, Butterfield. Division, Sykes. Brigade,.....; brigade, ......; brigade, ...... Division, Humphreys. Brigade, ......; brigade,......; brigade,...... Division, Griffin. Brigade, ......; brigade, ......; brigade, ...... 3d corps, Stoneman. Division, Sickles. Brigade, ......; brigade, ......; brigade, ...... Division, Birney. Ward's brigade, Berry's brigade; brigade, ..... Division, Whipple. Carroll's brigade; brigade,......; brigade, ...... Cavalry, Pleasonton's Division. Brigade,...; brigade, .... Bayard's Division. Brigade, ......; brigade, ..... Reserve Artillery, Hunt. Confederate army. Commander-in-chief, General R. E. Lee. 1st corps, Longstreet. 1st Division, R. H. Anderson. Wright's brigade, Armistead's briga