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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 164 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for F. Siegel or search for F. Siegel in all documents.

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heavy column of infantry from the hill, where Siegel's guns had been heard before. Thinking they wf the 9th inst. I was ordered to report to Colonel Siegel at six o'clock with my company, (I, First Farrand, First Infantry, also reported to Colonel Siegel, but was not under my command, being placet. I watched them for a few moments, when Colonel Siegel sent me word to take the first left-hand rt point. While retreating along this road, Col. Siegel asked me to march slowly so that the infante of them had a horse shot under him. When General Siegel, who commanded the eastern division, heardgetables for the rebel commissary department. Siegel advanced upon the enemy without being seen, ta and seven hundred and twenty wounded. Five of Siegel's guns were taken on the field. I had three o four different points--Gen. Lyon on the west, Siegel on the south, Sturgis on the north, and Sweeneri is gloriously confirmed; Lyon is killed and Siegel in flight and believed to be captured; Sweeney[43 more...]
tacked the forces in our rear, commanded by Gen. Siegel, capturing 157 prisoners, and killing 64 me General Lyon attacked us on our left and General Siegel on our right and rear. From these points hich the enemy were posted. Far on the right, Siegel had opened his battery upon Churchill's and Grnnoneers away. Five guns were here taken, and Siegel's command, completely routed, were in rapid ree of them had a horse shot under him. When General Siegel, who commanded the eastern division, heardpon Maj. Sturgis. There was no certainty that Siegel had been engaged in the fight at all, as our ato cross the creek, and see if I could find Col. Siegel, as a report had reached us that he was entwe joined them and returned to the city. Gen. Siegel, upon hearing the battle opened by Gen. Lyogetables for the rebel commissary department. Siegel advanced upon the enemy without being seen, taf the battle it is said the five guns, lost by Siegel, were also turned against us. The guns of the [13 more...]
thin one thousand two hundred yards of my tent. We were surprised completely. Siegel also attacked us in our rear, opposite Lyon's point of attack. The battle grht — regiment against regiment, advancing and retreating for about three hours. Siegel's battery was taken (in our rear) by the gallant Louisiana regiment at the poinleaving Gen. Lyon dead — not even taking his papers from the body. Before this Siegel was in full retreat; was charged by some Arkansas men, and with the remnant of five hundred and seventeen killed and seven hundred and twenty wounded. Five of Siegel's guns were taken on the field. I had three of them in my charge that night. attack was made simultaneously at four different points--Gen. Lyon on the west, Siegel on the south, Sturgis on the north, and Sweeney, I think, on the east. Our encltation. The victory in Missouri is gloriously confirmed; Lyon is killed and Siegel in flight and believed to be captured; Sweeney is killed, and Southwestern Miss