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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 203 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 116 4 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 107 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 103 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 97 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 82 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 74 2 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 73 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 55 1 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 50 2 Browse Search
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arched rapidly back in three columns. I directed McDowell, with his own and Sigel's corps, to march upon Gainesville by the Warrenton and Alexandria turnpike; Ree towards Warrenton. He was met six miles west of Centreville by McDowell and Sigel late this afternoon. A severe fight took place, which was terminated by darkneand the press so effectually gagged that no word of commendation may escape it. Sigel, Major-General Franz Sigel has proved himself an excellent soldier; and if Major-General Franz Sigel has proved himself an excellent soldier; and if he had been untrammelled by those in power, or given a distinct command away from Fremont and other incapables, he would have made a great name for himself long ere aise from some of the best soldiers in Europe. When the rebellion was crushed, Sigel emigrated to America, and settled in St. Louis, marrying the daughter of a genthe Federal Army, and subjected on all occasions to many slights and annoyances, Sigel is a much better General than many who have been his superiors in command, and
a junction with Jackson's small force, and, by common consent, both little wings met and joined in Cedar County, July third. Information was now received that Sigel had been despatched from St. Louis with over three thousand men by the south branch of the Pacific Railroad, and was actually in Carthage, not many miles distant it; nevertheless, on the fifth of July, at two A. M., we boldly began our march towards Carthage. After a march of seven hours, word was brought by our scouts that Sigel was in front, with the number of troops first reported, and eight guns. Still we moved on, until between ten and eleven A. M. we came in full view of the enemy dreful to place in commanding positions. Our small force of cavalry, after much discussion, was placed upon the wings, and hardly were these dispositions made, when Sigel's guns opened on us with great fury; nor was it possible for our cavalry to attack them either in flank or rear, as intended, for their constant cannonade frighten
, bewildered by the unexpected discomfiture of Sigel at Carthage. After a halt, Lyon, Sigel, and oSigel, and others formed a junction at Springfield, where they numbered some twelve or fifteen thousand men, wef Springfield, where it was reported Lyon and Sigel were encamped on hills beside the road. We ha we were all alike in a precarious condition. Sigel, in fact, was attacking our right and rear wit excitement and formed line, it was found that Sigel had already advanced some distance, while Lyon, hearing that Sigel was fairly engaged, pushed the centre and left with great energy. Totten's babserving the destructive effect of the fire of Sigel's guns, McCulloch, determined to make a bold dnd slashing about them with the wildest fury. Sigel was totally routed! His infantry, opposed to the impetuosity and valor of our men, as both Sigel and Lyon crept upon us during night, and took ers are the valiant German and Dutch heroes of Sigel, runaways from battle-fields, who show their p
hem, and sending word to Albert Pike to hurry forward with his brigade of Indians, moved out of camp on the fourth of March, with Price and McCulloch's forces, his intention being to surround the enemy's advance, some eight thousand strong, under Sigel, at Bentonville. That excellent officer, however, was not to be so caught; he was far superior to Van Dorn in generalship, and successfully slipped through his fingers, fighting as he went towards the main body at the creek. This retreat of SigSigel was admirably conducted, and though he could not successfully withstand our advance, he fought manfully and scientifically, losing many men, some prisoners, and stores. He effected a junction with Sturgis and Curtis, however, and on the seventh both armies were in full view of each other. Early in the morning, Van Dorn bad made every disposition for attack, and the advance began. The enemy were strongly posted on high ground, as usual, their front being covered with a heavy body of skirmi
they turn out with alacrity to ascertain what that something is. But this is not in form, and though commanders look upon the matter lightly, it may be the occasion of much mischief. Take a case in point: At the battle of Oak Hill, in Missouri, the camps and commands of Price and McCulloch were some distance apart, and the Missourians, it is said, were so much accustomed to beating drums at all times, that when they were suddenly attacked by Lyon, McCulloch took no notice of the call, until Sigel opened fire upon his pickets, when he ascertained that for once the Missouri drummers meant something by their thumpings. I do not say that such a thing would happen with us, for as volunteers we are the best drilled in essentials of any troops in the world, and are ever on the alert, more frequently moving in search of the enemy than being sought. But although uniforms, fine bands, pipeclay, and all the rest are desirable things enough, we must, for the present, be content to do without t
campments in different parts of the country, and had discovered the following facts: One of the enemy's army corps, under Sigel, was on their right among the hills at Sperryville, watching the roads and all direct communication with their rear at Mofare, laughed at the idea. Jackson is too wise to defer an engagement, said they; and is fully aware that, by to-morrow, Sigel and others will be up within supporting distance and may overwhelm him. Besides, when our general commences late in the d vanity and bombast. It was ascertained from these prisoners, also, that General McDowell's forces had arrived, and that Sigel was rapidly approaching, so that by the morrow there would be two full corps before us, irrespective of Banks, who was st an engagement on the morrow, in which he could not reasonably have expected to be successful. The commands of McDowell, Sigel, and Banks, amounted originally to sixty thousand men, with a heavy force of artillery; while the most that Jackson could
we learned that a change of position had taken place among the enemy, and that Sigel's corps was acting in our immediate front: next day it was ascertained that the cavalry and flying artillery, as usual, being the first to exchange shots with Sigel's rear-guard, causing it much damage. From the eighteenth to the twentieth heavy firing was maintained almost without intermission. Yet so well did Sigel handle his men, that they were able to cross the Rappahannock on the twentieth, almost wared that Heintzelman was moving against our left under Ewell near Centreville; Sigel was operating against the centre under Jackson; and Porter, with his regulars agiving way, a sudden attack was made on their centre, commanded by McDowell and Sigel. The assault was neither long nor doubtful, for the enemy retired at the firstd as if their whole army was giving way to panic; yet, through the exertions of Sigel, the gap in their centre was quickly filled up, and the fight maintained there
ement is doubtless correct, for I know we must have suffered fearfully, judging from the hurry and confusion of retreat. Your pickets informed me, that all the roads are literally blocked up with wagons, caissons, and cannon. I do not doubt it, for it is no use disguising the fact that we were completely routed. Your attack upon our left was a fierce affair, and Porter suffered terribly. Had your assault upon our centre succeeded as well, we should never have reached Centreville alive. Sigel behaved like a hero there, and so did McDowell; had they not rushed into the wide gap with fresh troops and stubbornly defended it, our whole army would have been divided and slaughtered piecemeal. It is true, as you have been told, that we never had confidence in Pope; we all felt that he was perfectly bewildered during the week, galloping from this place to that, giving orders one minute and countermanding them another. We did as directed, however, and here we are, prisoners, but migh
Chapter 44: McClellan again invades Virginia Sigel is pushed forward from Washington, and takes position at Manassas the Federal main army moves east of the blue Ridge, and has Headquarters at Warrenton Lee marches in a parallel line through the Shenandoah Valley surprise and flight of Sigel upon the appearance of Confederate cavalry change of Federal commanders rapid march of the Federals to the Rappahannock battle of Fredericksburgh, December thirteenth. How long McCletors, until fully and superabundantly reenforced and equipped. Some time before his own advance, McClellan had pushed Sigel forward from Washington to Manassas Junction, with a reported force of thirty thousand men, but these were said to be levd force. The left wing under Jackson had not arrived, though it was rapidly pushing towards us; yet ascertaining that Sigel still held his corps at Manassas, and had not moved nearer to Burnside, Jackson sent a strong force of cavalry to reconno
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The first year of the War in Missouri. (search)
g orders for the movement of his troops. Sweeny and Sigel were sent with about 3000 men to the south-west to iefferson City, had sent under General Sweeny and Colonel Sigel to the south-west to intercept the Governor's retreat toward Arkansas. Sigel, in executing this plan, had first attempted to intercept Price. Failing in thating his armed men (about 4000), the Governor awaited Sigel's attack. The fight (known as the battle of Carthage) did not last long, for Sigel was outnumbered four to one, and the Missourians quickly put him to flight. Heon did not learn till the 9th that they had defeated Sigel and effected a junction with McCulloch. He then mady attacked on the north by Lyon, and on the south by Sigel. For maps and more specific descriptions of the tenerals Pearce and Wherry, Colonel Mulligan, and General Sigel, to follow.-editors. One of the stubbornest of other commands, and with them attacked and routed Sigel (who had been sent to attack the rear), capturing fi
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