Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Sigel or search for Sigel in all documents.

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results in the last year of the Civil War. It was the unification of the Federal army under Ulysses S. Grant. His son, in the pages that follow, repeats the businesslike agreement with President Lincoln which made possible the wielding of all the Union armies as one mighty weapon. The structure of Volume II reflects the Civil War situation thus changed in May, 1864. No longer were battles to be fought here and there unrelated; but a definite movement was made by Grant Versus Lee on the 4th of May, accompanied by the simultaneous movements of Butler, Sherman, and Sigel — all under the absolute control of the man who kept his headquarters near those of Meade, Commander of the Army of the Potomac. Against such concentrated strokes the enfeebled Confederacy could not stand. Only the utter courage of leaders and soldiers innately brave, who were fighting for a cause they felt meant home no less than principle, prolonged the struggle during the tragic year ending with May, 1865.
tion by the supreme word of Grant at the beginning of May, 1864. East and West, the concentrated forces were to participate as much as possible in one simultaneous advance to strike the vitals of the Confederacy. The movements of Sherman, Banks, Sigel, and Butler were intended to be direct factors in the efficiency of his own mighty battering on the brave front of Lee's army. All along the line from the Mississippi to the Atlantic there was to be cooperation so that the widely separated armies of the South would have their hands full of fighting and could spare no reenforcements to each other. But it took only a few weeks to convince Grant that in Robert E. Lee, he had met more than his match in strategy. Sigel and Butler failed him at New Market and Drewry's Bluff. The simultaneous movement crumbled. Lee's men: Confederate soldiers in Virginia, 1864 The faces of the veterans in this photograph of 1864 reflect more forcibly than volumes of historical essays, the privatio
d for ten years as a professor before the outbreak of the war. The cadets of the V. M. I. had fought like veterans in a body under Breckinridge in the battle with Sigel at New Market. Possibly it was because of the school's contributions to the Confederate cause that General Hunter ordered it to be burned. At any rate, he seems venteen thousand troops, and marching under the steady glare of a July sun, two weeks later, his approach was the signal for the Union troops at Martinsburg, under Sigel, to fall back across the Potomac to Maryland Heights. The road to Washington was thus blocked at Harper's Ferry, where Early intended to cross. He therefore was compelled to get over at Shepherdstown, while Breckenridge engaged Sigel at Harper's Ferry. Once across the river, Early's scouting parties quickly destroyed miles of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, cut the embankments and locks of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, levied contributions upon the citizens of Hagerstown and Frederick,
d for ten years as a professor before the outbreak of the war. The cadets of the V. M. I. had fought like veterans in a body under Breckinridge in the battle with Sigel at New Market. Possibly it was because of the school's contributions to the Confederate cause that General Hunter ordered it to be burned. At any rate, he seems venteen thousand troops, and marching under the steady glare of a July sun, two weeks later, his approach was the signal for the Union troops at Martinsburg, under Sigel, to fall back across the Potomac to Maryland Heights. The road to Washington was thus blocked at Harper's Ferry, where Early intended to cross. He therefore was compelled to get over at Shepherdstown, while Breckenridge engaged Sigel at Harper's Ferry. Once across the river, Early's scouting parties quickly destroyed miles of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, cut the embankments and locks of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, levied contributions upon the citizens of Hagerstown and Frederick,
oped that the man who slew him has forgotten it, for this face would haunt him surely. Many who fought in the blue ranks were young, but in the South there were whole companies made up of such boys as this. At the battle of Newmarket the scholars of the Virgina Military Institute, the eldest seventeen and the youngest twelve, marched from the classrooms under arms, joined the forces of General Breckinridge, and aided by their historic charge to gain a brilliant victory over the Federal General Sigel. The never-give — in spirit was implanted in the youth of the Confederacy, as well as in the hearts of the grizzled veterans. Lee had inspired them, but in addition to this inspiration, as General Gordon writes, every man of them was supported by their extraordinary consecration, resulting from the conviction that he was fighting in the defense of home and the rights of his State. Hence their unfaltering faith in the justice of the cause, their fortitude in the extremest privations, t
oped that the man who slew him has forgotten it, for this face would haunt him surely. Many who fought in the blue ranks were young, but in the South there were whole companies made up of such boys as this. At the battle of Newmarket the scholars of the Virgina Military Institute, the eldest seventeen and the youngest twelve, marched from the classrooms under arms, joined the forces of General Breckinridge, and aided by their historic charge to gain a brilliant victory over the Federal General Sigel. The never-give — in spirit was implanted in the youth of the Confederacy, as well as in the hearts of the grizzled veterans. Lee had inspired them, but in addition to this inspiration, as General Gordon writes, every man of them was supported by their extraordinary consecration, resulting from the conviction that he was fighting in the defense of home and the rights of his State. Hence their unfaltering faith in the justice of the cause, their fortitude in the extremest privations, t
rmy of Tennessee, Gen. J. E. Johnston, commanding; Army of Mississippi, Lieut.-Gen. Leonidas Polk: Losses: Union, 600 killed, 2147 wounded; Confed., 300 killed, 1500 wounded, 1000 missing. May 15, 1864: New Market, Va. Union, Maj.-Gen. Sigel's command; Confed., Gen. J. C. Breckinridge's command. Losses: Union, 93 killed, 482 wounded, 256 missing; Confed., 42 killed, 522 wounded. May 18, 1864: Rome and Kingston, Ga. Union, Second Division of Fourteenth Corps and C. Union, Troops of Department of the South; Confed., Gen. W. B. Taliaferro's command. Losses: Union, 19 killed, 97 wounded, 135 missing; Confed. No record found. July 4-7, 1864: Bolivar and Maryland Heights, Va. Union, Maj.-Gen. Sigel's Reserve Division; Confed., Gen. Jubal Early's command. Losses: Union, 20 killed, 80 wounded. July 5-7, 1864: John's Island, S. C. Union, Maj.-Gen. Foster's troops; Confed., Gen. W. B. Taliaferro's command. Losses: U