Browsing named entities in John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Sigel or search for Sigel in all documents.

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united with the command of Sterling Price. While encamped at Wilson's creek, near Springfield, August 10th, the combined forces were suddenly attacked by Lyon and Sigel. The Federals gained without much opposition the commanding position they desired, but Hebert's Louisianians and McIntosh's Arkansans were speedily sent against ttates troops; but these fresh volunteers, in the face of a galling fire, surmounted a fence and drove the enemy back. Then, far on the right, it was observed that Sigel had opened fire with a battery that threatened havoc. Mc-Culloch took two companies of the Third to seek the rear of the battery, while Lieutenant-Colonel Hyams, ird, and they had charged and taken five guns out of a battery of six. Again they were called on in the final charge which put the enemy to flight. Having routed Sigel they joined Price against Lyon, and as Lyon fell pushed the enemy before them into rout. Nine of the regiment were killed and 48 wounded. The regiment was in wint
lieved by the reserve artillery under Major Owen. The battle over, Butler scurried back to his intrenchments at Bermuda Hundred. After Cold Harbor, Early was sent with the Second corps to drive from the Shenandoah valley the tardy Federal column that was to have cut off the army of Northern Virginia from the Southwest. The Louisiana brigades, under Zebulon York, former colonel of the Fourteenth, now promoted to brigadier-general, were in that brisk march down the valley, the driving of Sigel's force to Maryland heights, and the rapid and exhausting journey through Maryland under a July sun. They joyfully went with Early, they and Terry's Virginians the representatives of Stonewall Jackson's old division. They never marched more debonairly; never fought more gallantly —as Wallace found at the Monocacy. In that brilliant battle Col. W. R. Peck, of the Ninth, commanding Hays' brigade, earned by his admirable conduct the praise of General Gordon. Among the killed and wounded Loui
which was a well-drilled and well-equipped organization made up chiefly of men from the northern part of the State, and was placed in the brigade of Gen. Ben McCulloch. In the battle of Wilson's Creek it was McCulloch's command that encountered Sigel. General McCulloch in his report of the fight with Sigel says: When we arrived near the enemy's battery we found that Reid's battery had opened upon it, and it was already in confusion. Advantage was taken of it and soon the Louisianians were gSigel says: When we arrived near the enemy's battery we found that Reid's battery had opened upon it, and it was already in confusion. Advantage was taken of it and soon the Louisianians were gallantly charging among the guns, and swept the cannoneers away. Five guns were here taken. On the 7th of March, 1862, at the battle of Pea Ridge, while Mc-Culloch and McIntosh were leading a charge which at first promised success, they were suddenly struck in flank by an overwhelming force of the enemy. McCulloch and McIntosh were killed, and Hebert with a number of his officers and men were captured. On May 26, 1862, Colonel Hebert was commissioned as a brigadier-general, and after having