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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 203 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 116 4 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 107 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 103 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 97 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 82 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 74 2 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 73 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 55 1 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 50 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Franz Sigel or search for Franz Sigel in all documents.

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es, and for several weeks the region between Bull Run and the Rapidan was the theatre of many daring cavalry exploits. To give more efficiency to the troops covering Washington in 1862, they were formed into an organization called the Army of Virginia, and placed under the command of Maj.-Gen. John Pope. General Halleck was then general-in-chief of all the armies, with his headquarters at Washington. The corps of the new army were commanded, respectively, by Generals McDowell, Banks, and Sigel. When McClellan had retreated to Harrison's Landing and the Confederate leaders were satisfied that no further attempts would then be made to take Richmond, they ordered Lee to make a dash on Washington. Hearing of this, Halleck ordered Pope, in the middle of July, to meet the intended invaders at the outset of their raid. General Rufus King led a troop of cavalry that destroyed railroads and bridges to within 30 or 40 miles of Richmond. Pope's troops were posted along a line from Freder
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Averill, William woods, 1832- (search)
arranged in a line extending from Staunton to Newport to intercept the raider. He dashed through this line at Covington in the face of some opposition, destroyed the bridges behind him, and one of his regiments, which had been cut off from the rest, swam the stream and joined the others, with the loss of four men drowned. Averill captured during the raid about 200 men. My command, he said in his report (Dec. 21, 1863), has marched, climbed, slid, and swam 340 miles since the 8th inst. He reported a loss of six men drowned, five wounded, and ninety missing. He performed gallant service under Hunter, Sigel, and Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley in 1864; and was brevetted major-general of volunteers in March, 1865. The same year he resigned his commission of captain in the regular army. He was consul-general at Montreal in 1866-69. In 1888, by special act of Congress, he was reappointed a captain in the army, and soon afterwards was retired. He died in Bath, N. Y., Feb. 3, 1900.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Carthage, battle of (search)
Carthage, battle of In the summer of 1861 General Lyon sent Col. Franz Sigel in pursuit of the Confederates under Governor Price in southeastern Missouri. His force consisted of nearly 1,000 loyal Missourians (of his own and Salomon's regiments) with two batteries of artillery of four field-pieces each—in all about 1,500 men. Though the Confederates were reported to be more than 4,000 in number, Sigel diligently sought them. On the morning of July 5, 1861, he encountered large numbers of mounted riflemen, who seemed to be scouting, and a few miles from Carthage, the capital of Jasper county, he came upon the main body, under General Jackson, who wat a little past ten o'clock, by Sigel's field-pieces, and lasted about three hours, when, seeing his baggage in danger and his troops in peril of being outflanked, Sigel fell back and retreated, in perfect order, to the heights near Carthage, having been engaged in a running fight nearly all the way. The Confederates pressed him so
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cedar Mountain, battle of (search)
8th, and driven the National cavalry back on Culpeper Court-house. Gen. S. W. Crawford was sent with his brigade to assist the latter in retarding Jackson's march, and to ascertain his real intentions, if possible. The movements of the Confederates were so mysterious that it was difficult to guess where they intended to strike. On the morning of Aug. 9, Pope sent General Banks forward with about 8,000 men to join Crawford near Cedar Mountain, 8 miles southward of Culpeper Court-house, and Sigel was ordered to advance from Sperryville at the same time to the support of Banks. Jackson had now gained the commanding heights of Cedar Mountain, and he sent forward General Ewell under the thick mask of the forest. Early's brigade of that division was thrown upon the Culpeper road. The Confederates planted batteries, and opened fire upon Crawford's batteries. Before Crawford and Banks were about 20,000 veteran soldiers in line of battle. Against these Banks moved towards evening, and
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Civil War in the United States. (search)
Helena, Ark., having captured the Confederate steamer Fair Play, containing a large quantity of smallarms and ammunition, also four fieldguns, and another laden with tents and baggage, and, proceeding up the Yazoo River, captured a Confederate battery of four guns, with a large quantity of powder, shot, shells, and grape.—27. Skirmish near Rienzi, Miss. Confederates routed by General Hooker at Kettle Run, near Manassas, Va.—28. Battle near Centreville, Va., by Nationals under McDowell and Sigel, and Confederates under Jackson, when the latter were defeated with a loss of 1,000 made prisoners and many arms. Skirmish near Woodbury, Tenn.; Confederates defeated.—29. City Point, on the James River, shelled and destroyed by Union gunboats.—30. Buckhannon, Va., entered and occupied by Confederates. Battle of Bolivar, Tenn.; Confederates routed.—31. Skirmish at Weldon, Va.; Confederates defeated.—Sept. 1. The legislature of Kentucky, alarmed by Confederate raids, adjourned from
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dahlgren, Ulric, 1842- (search)
Dahlgren, Ulric, 1842- Artillery officer; born in Bucks county, Pa., in 1842; son of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren. At the outbreak of the Civil War he became aide first to his father and later to General Sigel, and was Sigel's chief of artillery at the second battle of Bull Run. He distinguished himself in an attack on Fredericksburg and at the battle of Chancellorsville, and on the retreat of the Confederates from Gettysburg he led the charge into Hagerstown. He lost his life in a raid undertal Sigel, and was Sigel's chief of artillery at the second battle of Bull Run. He distinguished himself in an attack on Fredericksburg and at the battle of Chancellorsville, and on the retreat of the Confederates from Gettysburg he led the charge into Hagerstown. He lost his life in a raid undertaken for the purpose of releasing Daiquiri, where the American army of invasion disembarked. National prisoners at Libby prison and Belle Isle, near King and Queen's Court-house, Va., March 4, 1864.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dug Springs, battle at. (search)
Dug Springs, battle at. General Lyon was 80 miles from Springfield when he heard of the perils of Sigel after the fight at Carthage. He pushed on to the relief of the latter, and on July 13, 1861, he and Sigel joined their forces, when the general took the chief command. The combined armies numbered, at that time, about 6,000 men, horse and foot, with eighteen pieces of artillery. There Lyon remained in a defensive attitude for some time, waiting for reinforcements which had been calleSigel joined their forces, when the general took the chief command. The combined armies numbered, at that time, about 6,000 men, horse and foot, with eighteen pieces of artillery. There Lyon remained in a defensive attitude for some time, waiting for reinforcements which had been called for, but which did not come. The Confederates had been largely reinforced; and at the close of July Lyon was informed that they were marching upon Springfield in two columns—20,000—under the respective commands of Generals Price, McCulloch, Pearce, McBride, and Rains. Lyon went out to meet them with about 6,000 men, foot and horse, and eighteen cannon, leaving a small force to guard Springfield. At Dug Springs, 19 miles southwest of Springfield, in a broken, oblong valley, they encounter
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fremont, John Charles 1813-1890 (search)
d compel them to retreat, at which time a flotilla of gunboats, then building near St. Louis, might descend the Mississippi, and assist in military operations against the batteries at Memphis. In the event of this movement being successful, he proposed to push on towards the Gulf of Mexico with his army, and take possession of New Orleans. More than 20,000 soldiers were set in motion (Sept. 27, 1861) southward (5,000 of them cavalry), under the respective commands of Generals Hunter, Pope, Sigel, McKinstry, and Asboth, accompanied by eighty-six heavy guns. These were moving southward early in October; and on the 11th, when his army was 30,000 strong, he wrote to the government: My plan is, New Orleans straight; I would precipitate the war forward, and end it soon victoriously. He was marching with confidence of success, and his troops were winning little victories here and there, when, through the influence of men jealous of him and his political enemies, Fremont's career was sudd
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Groveton, battle of. (search)
et, at the head of Lee's column, then approaching. Pope ordered McDowell, with Sigel and the troops of Reynolds, to hasten to Gainesville to intercept Longstreet. ewhat confused. Lee's whole army, now combined, pressed forward. Pope ordered Sigel, supported by Reynolds, to advance from Groveton and attack Jackson on wooded h hazards, until the main army should arrive. At five o'clock in the morning, Sigel, with the divisions of Schurz, Schenck, and Milroy, advanced to attack Jackson. A battle began at seven o'clock, and continued with great fury until ten, Sigel constantly advancing, while it was evident that Jackson had been reinforced. It oroughfare Gap all the morning unopposed, had now reached the field of action. Sigel maintained his ground until noon, when Kearny's division arrived, and took position on Sigel's right. Reynolds and Reno also came up, followed soon afterwards by Hooker. Then the Nationals outnumbered the Confederates, and for some hours the
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Logan, John Alexander 1826-1886 (search)
e, which indicates the future as well as the present. Wagons are rolling along rapidly to the rear, as if a mighty power was propelling them. I see no cause for alarm, though I think this order may cause it. McDowell moves on Gainesville, where Sigel now is. The latter got to Buckland Bridge in time to put out the fire and kick the enemy, who is pursuing his route unmolested to the Shenandoah, or Loudoun county. The forces are Longstreet's, A. P. Hill's, Jackson's, Whiting's, Ewell's, and An wandering about the woods for a time I withdrew him, and while doing so artillery opened upon us. The fire of the enemy having advanced and ours retired, have determined to withdraw to Manassas. I have attempted to communicate with McDowell and Sigel, but my messengers have run into the enemy. They have gathered artillery, and cavalry, and infantry, and the advancing masses of dust show the enemy coming in force. I am now going to the head of the column to see what is passing and how affa
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