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done had I been idle. In August, 1852, I joined the first class at the Academy in accordance with the order of the War Department, taking my place at the foot of the class and graduating with it the succeeding June, number thirty-four in a membership of fifty-two. At the head of this class graduated James B. McPherson, who was killed in the Atlanta campaign while commanding the Army of the Tennessee. It also contained such men as John M. Schofield, who commanded the Army of the Ohio; Joshua W. Sill, killed as a brigadier in the battle of Stone River; and many others who, in the war of the rebellion, on one side or the other, rose to prominence, General John B. Hood being the most distinguished member of the class among the Confederates. At the close of the final examination I made no formal application for assignment to any particular arm of the service, for I knew that my standing would not entitle me to one of the existing vacancies, and that I should be obliged to take a pla
apter XII Moving to Bowling Green James Card, the scout and guide General Sill Colonel Schaefer Colonel G. W. Roberts movement on Murfreesboroa openingiles. While we were in camp on Mill Creek the army was reorganized, and General Joshua W. Sill, at his own request, was assigned to my division, and took command of Cs, its three brigades of four regiments each being respectively commanded by General Sill, Colonel Frederick Schaefer and Colonel Dan McCook; but a few days later Cols brigade, from the garrison at Nashville, was substituted for McCook's. General Sill was a classmate of mine at the Military Academy, having graduated in 1853. the battle of Perryville had handled his men with the experience of a veteran. Sill's modesty and courage were exceeded only by a capacity that had already been demmost east, my left (Roberts's brigade) resting on the Wilkinson pike, the right (Sill's brigade) in the timber we had just gained, and the reserve brigade (Schaefer's
At 2 o'clock on the morning of the 31st General Sill came back to me to report that on his frontre furiously opened upon by Bush's battery from Sill's line, and by Hescock's and Houghtaling's batt When that portion of the enemy driven back by Sill recovered from its repulse it again advanced to of the enemy's initiatory attack I had sent to Sill's rear before daylight. Both Johnson's and ect me to a fire in reverse, I hastily withdrew Sill's brigade and the reserve regiments supporting ng first, then the batteries, and Roberts's and Sill's brigades following. When my division arrivedhtaling's battery in the angle. This presented Sill's and Schaefer's brigades in an almost oppositeis intrenchments in front of Stone River, while Sill's and Schaeffer's brigades, by facing nearly wen my right, came into position. Schaefer's and Sill's brigades being without a cartridge, I directee right of Palmer's division. Two regiments of Sill's brigade, however, on account of the conformat[10 more...]
in plenty, and to this point I decided to move. The place was named Camp Sill-now Fort Sill-in honor of my classmate, General Sill, killed at Stone River; and to make sure of the surrendered Indians, I required them all, Kiowas, Comanches, and Comano I cut the matter short by packing him into my ambulance and carrying him off to Camp Sill. By the time I got back to Sill, the Arapahoes were all in at the post, or near at hand. The promised surrender of the Cheyennes was still uncertain of for about thirty days; and the horses back at Arbuckle having picked up sufficiently for field service they were ordered to Sill, and this time I decided to send Custer out with his own and the Kansas regiment, with directions to insist on the immediareek, on what, I felt sure, was to be the final expedition of the campaign. I made the three hundred and sixty miles from Sill to Supply in seven days, but much to my surprise there found a despatch from General Grant directing me to repair immediat