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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 38 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 14 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 5, 1862., [Electronic resource] 9 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 5 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 1, April, 1902 - January, 1903 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 5 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 21, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 30, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 6, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Simmons or search for Simmons in all documents.

Your search returned 19 results in 4 document sections:

Twenty-eighth, and Thirty-sixth Ohio regiments, and Simmons's battery, with Schambeck's cavalry troop, was orde whole corps. Two twenty-pounder Parrott guns from Simmons's battery and two sections of McMullin's battery wey eighth and Thirtieth. Two ten-pounder Parrotts of Simmons's battery, under Lieut. Glassie, were pushed forwar subsequently in support of the advanced section of Simmons's battery, in both of which places he and his men ps used thus far were six, ten and twelve-pounders. Simmons's Ohio battery of four twenty-pounder pieces was noe left of the line. They were replied to by one of Simmons's twenty-pounders on our left, and Cooper's batterybattery, to which a section of twenty-pounders from Simmons's battery was also temporarily attached. Wilcox's Kanawha division, succeeded in getting a section of Simmons's battery, supported by the Twenty-eighth Ohio infa of Gen. Wilcox. The advance was partly covered by Simmons's, Muhlenberg's, Clark's and Cook's batteries, the
onsisting of the Eleventh, Twenty-eighth, and Thirty-sixth Ohio regiments, and Simmons's battery, with Schambeck's cavalry troop, was ordered to follow on the same rn would be supported by the whole corps. Two twenty-pounder Parrott guns from Simmons's battery and two sections of McMullin's battery were left in rear in position and the right by the Twenty eighth and Thirtieth. Two ten-pounder Parrotts of Simmons's battery, under Lieut. Glassie, were pushed forward to an open spot in the wogned a post on the left and subsequently in support of the advanced section of Simmons's battery, in both of which places he and his men performed their duty admirabontinued the duel. The guns used thus far were six, ten and twelve-pounders. Simmons's Ohio battery of four twenty-pounder pieces was now placed in position on theght, and of the other to the left of the line. They were replied to by one of Simmons's twenty-pounders on our left, and Cooper's battery on our right. The enemy c
's and Cook's batteries being placed on the heights to right and left, and somewhat to the front of Benjamin's battery, to which a section of twenty-pounders from Simmons's battery was also temporarily attached. Wilcox's division was also brought up and held as a reserve. About nine o'clock the order was received to cross the st Pennsylvania, from the same division, were ordered up. About the same time Col. Crook of the Second brigade, Kanawha division, succeeded in getting a section of Simmons's battery, supported by the Twenty-eighth Ohio infantry, in position to bear directly upon the enemy's position at the farthest end of the bridge, and, aided withthe enemy from his front, and then changing direction to his right, bringing his command in echelon on the left of Gen. Wilcox. The advance was partly covered by Simmons's, Muhlenberg's, Clark's and Cook's batteries, the other batteries of the corps being in part out of ammunition, and part being kept necessarily in position on th
ngues of flame were leaping from the windows and darting through the roofs. The sharp crack of rifled muskets, the heavy booming of our nine-inch* howitzer and six-pounder, the wild shouts of the combatants, and the roar of the consuming flames, made a scene of terrific sublimity. Seventeen houses were burned, and among them the court-house. Every commissioned officer did his whole duty truly and nobly. I ask leave to mention their names: Company A, Capt. Carlin and Lieuts. Williams and Simmons; company B, Capt. McConnell and Lieuts. Toms and Branden; company G, Capt. Moody and Lieut. Nichols; company H, Captain Le Blond, (Lieut. Gable, being very sick at the time, was not in the engagement.) What I have said of the commissioned officers is equally true of all the non-commissioned officers, and all the privates except four. Captain Moody, Lieuts. Toms, Branden, and Nichols, took guns and fought like soldiers in the ranks. Major Hart, commanding the forces, behaved with coolness a