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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 24, 1864., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for J. Marion Sims or search for J. Marion Sims in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Heroes of the old Camden District, South Carolina, 1776-1861. an Address to the Survivors of Fairfield county, delivered at Winnsboro, S. C., September 1,1888. (search)
Alexander kept one open there, and there was another at Bullock's Creek, York county, during this period; and there was also a school at Fishing Creek, kept open by Mrs. Gaston, the wife of Justice John Gaston. Inter arma leges silent, but letters were not allowed to sleep even though war was waging around the school-houses. Is it any wonder that the old Waxhaws have produced Andrew Jackson; Stephen D. Miller, the great jurist and statesman; James H. Thornwell, the great theologian; and J. Marion Sims, the greatest surgeon of this country? Judge William Smith, who succeeded Judge Gaillard in the United States Senate, was educated with Andrew Jackson at this time by Dr. Alexander at the Bullock's Creek school. Surely, my comrades, you who were born and bred amidst the scenes of the historic events to which we have alluded, and who must have heard of them at your mother's knees and imbibed their lessons from your earliest youth, must have received from them some inspiration of hero
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes on the battle of Cedar Creek. (search)
ack and in great disorder, and the brigades of our own division following suit up to ours, which was the extreme right of Kershaw; and then, with no troops for a considerable distance on our right and the field to the left a mass of fugitives, Colonel Sims, of the Twenty-first regiment, at this time in command of the brigade, consulted me and we both deemed it prudent to withdraw the brigade, which was done under fire and in reasonable order, for a half mile, or about that distance, when the brigade was halted on the brow of a hill and formed by him on a stone fence fronting to the enemy, and all the regiments in their places. Colonel Sims was killed in a few seconds after we halted, and the command devolved on me. On our left were a few hundred men of our division in irregular order, on our right General Ramseur's division (or part of it, rather) formed. I passed up and down the whole length of my brigade, seeking to inspire among my men a confidence of holding them in check and o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Old South. (search)
lina, is the inventor of the terrible gun that bears his name. The Georgians claim that their countryman, Rev. F. R. Goulding, is the inventor of the sewing-machine. General Gabriel J. Rains, by the construction of a peculiar friction primer, made the use of torpedoes successful in the Southern waters during the civil war, and demonstrated that weak maritime nations could be protected against the most powerful. The Le Contes, of Georgia, are to-day among our foremost men of science. Dr. J. Marion Sims, of South Carolina, had more reputation abroad than any other American physician. In literature, we have had such men as Marshall, Kennedy, Gayarre, Wirt, Gilmore, Simms, Hawks, Legare, Hayne, Ryan, Timrod, the Elliotts, of South Carolina, Tichnor, Lanier, Thornwell, Archibald Alexander and his sons, Addison and James W., Bledsoe, Mrs. Welby, Mrs. Terhune, &c. Brooke, of Virginia, solved the problem of deep sea sounding, which had so long baffled men of science. But the other day, G
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
395. Signal Corps of the C. S. A., 93; officers of, 9; secret cipher of, 101, 163, 171. Simkins' Battery, 159. Simkins. Col., 159 Simmons. Col. 265. Simons, Capt T. Y., 145. Simonton, Col. C. H., 129, 133, 134, 142, 150, 178, 398. Sims, Col., 391. Sims, Dr. J Marion. 13, 428. Singletary, 129. Skinner, Hon. James H., 296. Slaughter, Gen., 97. Slave Law, Fugitive, disregarded, 320, 322. Slave population of the South, Value of, 320. Slaves in the Federal army, 437. Sims, Dr. J Marion. 13, 428. Singletary, 129. Skinner, Hon. James H., 296. Slaughter, Gen., 97. Slave Law, Fugitive, disregarded, 320, 322. Slave population of the South, Value of, 320. Slaves in the Federal army, 437. Slavery not a cause with the South, not established by it, 247; in North and East, 249. Slidell, Hon., John, 273. Smith, Lt. A. B., 59. Smith, Capt., 88. Smith, Col, 97. Smith (Gen.), Baldy, 26. Smith's Battery, 72. Smith (Gen.), C. F., 81. Smith (Capt ), Clinton H, 38. Smith (Gen.), E. Kirby, 98. 102, 274 Smith (Gen.), F. H., 43. Smith, Gerrit, 320. Smith (Sergeant), J. B., 92. Smith, Lt., 405 Smith (Col.), Marshall J., 303 Smith (Lt.). M. L., 192. Smith (C