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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Confederate cruisers. (search)
was armed for hostile purposes, and unless the arming was done within British jurisdiction. The jury, in consequence, brought in a verdict of not guilty. Appeals and for a new trial followed, but were defeated upon various technical grounds, and the vessel was eventually released. The protracted series of trials, however, kept the vessel in custody until it was too late to make use of her as a cruiser, and she became a blockade-runner. Another vessel, the Pampero, built by Lieutenant George T. Sinclair, on the Clyde, was seized by the Scottish officials in November, 1863. To avoid the litigation and delay which had attended the Alexandra case a compromise was arranged between the owners — that is, the builders — and the Government, by which a verdict was entered for the Crown, and the owners were allowed to retain the vessel, provided they should not sell her for two years without the consent of the Crown. This simple arrangement, if it had been adopted in the case of the oth
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 12.91 (search)
reeman, our chief engineer, had been with us in the Sumter. The steerage mess was made up of three midshipmen — E. M. Anderson, of Georgia; E. A. Maffitt, of North Carolina, son of the captain of the Confederate States steamer Florida; and George T. Sinclair, of Virginia. The latter was afterward detached from the Alabama and made executive officer to Lieutenant Lowe on the Tuscaloosa, a tender that we captured and commissioned. Upon our arrival at Cherbourg, Sinclair came at once to join hisSinclair came at once to join his old ship, having heard of the contemplated engagement. Accompanying him came also Lieutenant William C. Whittle, Jr., of Virginia, a gallant young son of Commodore W. C. Whittle of the old navy, and Lieutenant John Grimball, a South Carolinian, offering their services for any position during the engagement. They were not permitted to join us, on the ground that it would be a violation of French neutrality. The remainder of the steerage mess was made up of young master's mates and engineers,