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D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 2 Browse Search
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e writer believes that fully two-thirds of those liable to service volunteered under this call. In all, twenty-eight regiments and several battalions promptly volunteered. The adjutant-general's office was daily crowded by men offering companies for service. The Eleventh regiment (Bethel) was reorganized at High Point; the Fortysec-ond (Col. G. C. Gibbs), at Salisbury, April 22d; and at Camp Mangum, near Raleigh, were organized the Forty-third (Col. T. S. Kenan), the Forty-fourth (Col. G. B. Singeltary), the Forty-fifth (Col. Junius Daniel), the Forty-sixth (Col. E. D. Hall), the Forty-seventh (Col. S. H. Rogers), the Forty-eighth (Col. R. C. Hill), the Forty-ninth (Col. S. D. Ramseur), the Fiftieth (Col. M. D. Crator), the Fifty-second (Col. J. K. Marshall), the Fifty-third (Col. W. A. Owens), the Fifty-fourth (Col. John Wimbish), and the Fifty-fifth (Col. J. K. Conolly) —all between the 21st of April and the 19th of May. The Fifty-first (Col. J. L. Cantwell) was recruited in th
rred around Gatesville, Trenton, Young's crossroads, Pollocksville and Clinton. On the 5th of June, there was a collision of an hour's duration between the Twenty-fourth Massachusetts regiment, a few cavalrymen, and two pieces of artillery on the Federal side, and Col. G. B. Singeltary's Forty-fourth North Carolina regiment at Tranter's creek, near Washington. During this engagement Colonel Singeltary was killed. In these various actions the Confederate losses were: killed, 8; wounded, 17. urred around Gatesville, Trenton, Young's crossroads, Pollocksville and Clinton. On the 5th of June, there was a collision of an hour's duration between the Twenty-fourth Massachusetts regiment, a few cavalrymen, and two pieces of artillery on the Federal side, and Col. G. B. Singeltary's Forty-fourth North Carolina regiment at Tranter's creek, near Washington. During this engagement Colonel Singeltary was killed. In these various actions the Confederate losses were: killed, 8; wounded, 17.
econd battalion, Lieut.-Col. H. L. Andrews, moved toward New Bern by the lower Trent road; the cavalry under General Robertson was sent by the upper Trent road, and General Pettigrew's brigade, with fifteen guns under Major Haskell, was ordered to approach the city near Barrington's Ferry, to bombard the gunboats and Fort Anderson. General Pettigrew's brigade consisted of the following North Carolina regiments: Eleventh, Colonel Leventhorpe; Twenty-sixth, Colonel Burgwyn; Forty-fourth, Colonel Singeltary; Fortysev-enth, Colonel Faribault, and Fifty-second, Colonel Marshall. At Deep Gully, a few miles out from New Bern, General Daniel found five companies and two field pieces in strong position. With four companies, he at once attacked and routed the Federals. This initiatory success could not, however, be followed up, as General Pettigrew, after every exertion, found it impossible to carry out his orders. He was expected to take Fort Anderson, to advance his guns to that point,
al Cooke marched to the attack, his Carolina regiments were drawn up as follows: The Forty-sixth, Colonel Hall, on the right; the Fifteenth, Col. William MacRae, next; the Twenty-seventh, Colonel Gilmer, next, and on the left, the Forty-eighth, Colonel Walkup. General Kirkland's North Carolinians were on Cooke's left in this order: The Eleventh, Lieutenant-Colonel Martin, and the Fifty-second, Lieut.-Col. B. F. Little, were on the left; the Twenty-sixth, Colonel Lane, the Forty-fourth, Colonel Singeltary, and the Forty-seventh, Colonel Faribault, on the right Cooke's men, on the right, stepped to the front with boldness and began the descent of the slope. Then for the first time they saw the enemy's real line of battle; but their orders were to break it if possible. The batteries speedily got their range and the infantry fire was incessant. As they fired up the hill, says Capt. J. A. Graham, every one of their shots told. Almost at the first volley, General Cooke and Colonel Gil
rces were thus engaged, Gen. A. P. Hill's corps was battling with Getty and Hancock on the lower road. The fact, however, that there are in the official records so few reports from the officers engaged, makes it difficult to fully ascertain the parts borne by the North Carolina troops. There were four North Carolina brigades and one regiment, the Fifty-fifth, Colonel Belo, in Hill's corps: Kirkland's—the Eleventh, Colonel Martin; Twenty-sixth, Lieutenant-Colonel Jones; Forty-fourth, Colonel Singeltary; Forty-seventh, Colonel Faribault; Fifty-second, Colonel Little; Cooke's brigade—the Fifteenth, Lieutenant-Colonel Yarborough; Twentysev-enth, Colonel Gilmer; Forty-sixth, Colonel Saunders; Forty-eighth, Colonel Walkup; Lane's brigade—the Seventh, Colonel Davidson; Eighteenth, Colonel Barry; Twenty-eighth, Colonel Speer; Thirty-third, Colonel Avery; Thirty-seventh, Colonel Barbour; Scales' brigade—Thirteenth, Colonel Hyman; Sixteenth, Colonel Stowe; Twenty-second, Colonel Galloway; Th