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nd the following may therefore be taken as a very close approximation of the actual casualties in my brigade. Those reported missing are supposed to be killed or taken prisoners:  Killed.Wounded.Missing.Total. Second Regt. Conn. Vols25916 First Regt. Conn. Vols--8917 Third Regt. Conn. Vols4131835 Second Regt. Maine Vols1540115170 Prisoners killed and wounded of Second Maine Regt.------4      Total,   242 In addition to the above reported loss of the Second Maine regiment, Lieut. Skinner, Surgeon Allen and his son, while assisting the wounded, were taken prisoners. The aggregate loss of this gallant regiment was therefore 174 out of 640, which was the complete strength on going into action. It was impossible to obtain exact returns of my brigade on the morning of the 21st, but I am certain its aggregate strength was about 2,500 men. We captured fifteen of the enemy and brought six prisoners to Washington. In concluding the account of the battle, I am happy to be able
gment; and at the proper moment he displayed capacity for command and personal gallantry. Col. Moore, commanding the 1st Virginia volunteers, was severely wounded at the head of his regiment, the command of which subsequently devolved upon Major Skinner, Lieut.-Col. Fry having been obliged to leave the field in consequence of a sun-stroke. An accomplished, promising officer, Major Carter H. Herrison, 11th regiment Virginia volunteers, was lost to the service while leading two companies ofdes alacrity, ardor and intelligence, mentions his special obligations to Cols. Moore, Garland, and Corse, commanding, severally, regiments of his brigade, and to their field-officers, Lieut.-Cols. Fry, Funsten, and Munford, and Majors Brent and Skinner, of whom he says: they displayed more coolness and energy than is usual among veterans of the old service. General Longstreet also mentions the conduct of Captain Marey, of the 17th Virginia volunteers, as especially gallant on one occasion, in