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ed, and five hundred and sixty-six missing. The loss of the enemy in killed was about sixty; number of wounded not known, as they carried all but twelve off the ground; but wounded officers, who were taken prisoners, represent the number of wounded as being very large. We took sixty-five prisoners. Brigadier-General McGinnis, being very ill, was not able to be on the field. The troops of the division behaved admirably under the command of Brigadier-General Cameron, of the First, and Colonel Slack, of the Second brigade. The action of General Burbridge was gallant and judicious, from the time I first saw him until the close of the engagement. The conduct of the Sixty-seventh regiment Indiana infantry was inexplicable, and their surrender can only be attributed to the incompetency or cowardice of the commanding officer. They had not a single man killed. Our mounted force, under Colonels Fonda and Robinson, though very small, behaved very handsomely. I left at Carrion Crow Bayo
the march, and halted for the night at Calighan's. Next morning, as the column started, a party of bushwhackers fired into the Second. One of the rascals was captured. We took the road to Warm Springs, and a detachment of the Eighth, under Major Slack, was sent to make a reconnoissance in the direction of Covington. During the march this morning, we were startled by an explosion, as if a steam-boiler or mine had burst, and a large volume of smoke arose. One of the caissons of Ewing's battcattering the contents all around, and blowing the caisson all to atoms. The accident was occasioned by a percussion-shell being carelessly packed. We arrived at the Jackson River road at one o'clock, and made a halt for the detachment under Major Slack to overtake us. We marched up the valley of Jackson River, and after night burned a rebel camp and potash factory. We encamped for the night at Gatewood's, and here was plenty of corn and wheat for our horses; it had been snowing during the d