Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Slemmer or search for Slemmer in all documents.

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te authorities. In St. Louis, the Custom-House, Sub-Treasury, and Post Office were garrisoned by a handful of Federal soldiers as a protection against a similar movement. Mr. Thomas, after a very few days' service, resigned control of the Treasury, and was succeeded by Gen. John A. Dix, of New York. In Florida, Fort Barrancas and the Navy Yard at Pensacola were seized by Florida and Alabama forces on the 13th; Commander Armstrong surrendering them without a struggle. He ordered Lieut. Slemmer, likewise, to surrender Forts Pickens and McRae; but the intrepid subordinate defied the order, and, withdrawing his small force from Fort McRae to the stronger and less accessible Fort Pickens, announced his determination to hold out to the last. He was soon after besieged therein by a formidable volunteer force; and a dispatch from Pensacola announced that Fort McRae is being occupied and the guns manned by the allied forces of Florida, Alabama, and Mississippi. Col. Hayne, as agen
two hours; and two of our shells are said to have penetrated two Rebel sloops laden with men, tearing them to pieces and destroying all on board. Had our land forces efficiently cooperated, most of the Rebels might have been taken; as it was, Col. Brown returned unmolested to the fort. Fort Pickens, on the western extremity of Santa Rosa Island, commanding the main entrance to Pensacola harbor, was saved to the Union, as we have seen, Page 412. by the fidelity and prompt energy of Lieut. Slemmer. It was reenforced soon after the fall Map of Fort Pickens, Pensacola, etc. of Sumter, and its defense confided to Col. Harvey Brown. A formidable Rebel force, ultimately commanded by Gen. Braxton Bragg, was assembled, early in the war, at Pensacola, and long threatened an attack or bombardment, which, on our side, was eagerly awaited. Com. William Mervine, commanding the Gulf Blockading Squadron, having observed that a schooner named the Judah was being fitted out in the harbor o
lorida troops, 412. Fort Morgan, seized by Alabama, 412. Fort Moultrie, evacuated by Major Anderson, 407; what the Charleston papers said, 407-8; occupied by S. C., 409; fires on Star of the West, 412. Fort Pickens, Fla., occupied by Lieut. Slemmer, 412; order of Bragg, 436; President's Message, 556; Rebel attack on Santa Rosa Island, etc., 601-602. Fort Pike, seized by Louisiana troops, 412. Fort Pulaski, seized by Georgia troops, 411. Fort Scott, Kansas, captured by MontgomerT., in Kentucky, 615. Sigel, Col. Franz, beats the Rebels at Carthage, Mo., 575; is outranked by Gen. Lyon, 576; attacks the enemy at Wilson's Creek, 579; 581; 591; 593. Sims, Thomas, the case of, 215. Slack, Gen., 574; wounded, 582. Slemmer, Lieut., holds Fort Pickens, 412; 601. Slidell, John, of La., 373; taken by Capt. Wilkes, 606; rendered up to Great Britain, 608. Sloane, rush R., assists fugitive slaves, 218. Slocum, Col. H. W., wounded at Bull Run, 545. Slocum, Co