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The Daily Dispatch: November 6, 1861., [Electronic resource] 9 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 19, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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The Daily Dispatch: November 6, 1861., [Electronic resource], The Departure of Messrs. Mason the Slidell — their arrival in Havana — how they reached Cuba, etc. (search)
ng persons: Hon. J. M. Mason, of Virginia; Mr. MacFarlane, Secretary to Mr. Mason; Hon. John Slidell of Louisiana, Mrs. Slidell, Miss Mathilde Slidell, Miss Rosine Slidell; Mr. Eustis, (Secretary to Mr. Slidell,) Mrs. Eustis, who is a daughter of Mr. Corcoran, the Washington banker, now in Fort Lafayette; Col. Le Mat, of LouisMr. Slidell,) Mrs. Eustis, who is a daughter of Mr. Corcoran, the Washington banker, now in Fort Lafayette; Col. Le Mat, of Louisiana, the inventor of the grape-shot revolver, and two or three other gentlemen, whom it will be best, for the present, not to name. The night was pitch dark, and about midnight a light rain began falling, which rendered the chances of being detected by the blockaders exceedingly slim. At one o'clock on Saturday morning, way towards Cuba. On the 16th inst. she arrived at Cardenas, where the Commissioners landed. The news that a Southern steamer had arrived with Messrs. Mason and Slidell on board, which was telegraphed from Cardenas to Havana, was scarcely credited at the latter place. But when on the 17th inst., the Theodora came up the harbor o
. The steamer Columbia arrived at New York from Havana on the 30th ult., with dates to the 25th inst.: The rebel steamer Theodora, formerly the Gordon, Capt. Lockwood, left Havana on the 23d for Charleston. She landed Messrs. Mason and Slidell, the Rebel Commissioners to England and France, at Cardenas, and afterwards went to Havana. Mason and Slidell went overland to Havana, where they were received with the highest consideration by all the officials, from the Captain General down. Slidell went overland to Havana, where they were received with the highest consideration by all the officials, from the Captain General down. The Theodora took a large quantity of arms on her return; also, provisions, coffee, &c. Her captain was presented with a silk flag by the Southern ladies at Havana. She took twenty passengers, including Mr. Meade, the late U. S. Minister to Brazil. Mr. Shufeldt, the American Consul General, telegraphed to the commander of the U. S. steam frigate San Jacinto, at Trinidad, on the 24th, to proceed at once to Havana. The British Consul called on the rebel Commissioners in full unifo
brilliantly among the black coats decorated with all the Orders of Europe, in the humble church, which was too small for such a ceremony. The toilet of the bride — a robe of white satin, a large veil of tulle, a light crown of orange flowers passing over the forehead, and a bouquet of the same flowers at the waist, around the neck a simple and magnificent dentelle attached by an emerald encircled with diamonds — attracted general admiration, as also the young and fresh parure of Mdlle. Rosine Slidell, who, accompanied by her young brother, took up the collection. In the audience the American ladies sustained the comparison with all that Paris has of elegance and beauty in the feminine world; so that our great poet, Hugo, will no longer dare to say of America: "'Peuple a peine ebauche nation de hasard, Sans tige, sans passe, sans histoire et sans art!. "But when he wrote these two terrible lines the Americans had only produced steamboats swifter than the arrow and red