Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for John Slidell or search for John Slidell in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Hon. James Murray Mason, of Mason & Slidell fame. (search)
Hon. James Murray Mason, of Mason & Slidell fame. A Tribute to this exalted patriot by Hon. Henry A. Wise. The Hon. James Murray Mason is no more. His death has already been announced, but we deem it a pleasure, as well as a duty, to take more than a cursory notice of the loss of such a man to the once honored State, whirn Confederacy, without fear and without reproach. He was incapable of treason. In the war he was honored by President Davis with the high trust, jointly with Mr. Slidell, of Commissioner to the European Powers; his residence was in England, and he was most efficient in obtaining credit, in furthering Confederate privateering, and in putting his Government and people in the most respectible attitude before the nations and courts of Europe. On the passage out in October, 1861, he and Mr. Slidell arrived at Havanna, sailed thence on the royal mail steamer Trent, for England, and on the 8th of November, the Trent was boarded by the United States war steame
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.20 (search)
passing glance at a long, laborious and brilliant career. Mr. Calhoun, Mr. Clay and Mr. Webster all left the Senate, or died in the Senate, about 1851 or 1852. When this grand triumvirate had departed, there were yet many strong men who served in that body with Mr. Hunter from 1850 to 1861 who have made a great impress upon our history. I need hardly mention such great names as Senators Mason, Toombs, Jefferson Davis, Benjamin, Stephen A. Douglas, Seward, Sumner, Chase, Trumbull, Bayard, Slidell and Crittenden. Yet I can truthfully assert that of this list of very able men, not one was superior in general, all-'round ability to Mr. Hunter; not one was his equal in legislative force and influence; not one was so universally confided in and trusted. Since the passing away of Jefferson, Madison, Marshall and Monroe, hardly any Virginian has borne so influential a part in political affairs as R. M. T. Hunter, and certainly no Virginian has done so in the Federal Congress, though the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.35 (search)
n attaining his majority he was admitted to practice at the bar in New Orleans, and soon forged his way to the front. In 1847 he was engaged as counsel in the famous Spanish land cases, which involved the ownership of immense properties in California. For his legal services in this controversy he received the largest fee on record at that time, $25,000. Mr. Benjamin in 1852 was sent to the United States Senate from Louisiana, and five years later he was re-elected. His colleague was Mr. Slidell; who afterward figured so prominently in the Trent affair. It was during this time that he was tendered a position on the bench of the Supreme Court of the United States, by President Franklin Pierce, an offer which was declined, he preferring to devote his time to private practice—for be it understood that Mr. Benjamin, of Louisiana, stood second to no lawyer in the land. In the Senate he was among the foremost, and Charles Sumner, whom he often opposed in debate, declared that Mr. B
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.38 (search)
se of Representatives of the State, by a large majority. Reverting to the bar in 1850 in Louisiana, Mr. Semmes told many delightful reminiscences. He enjoyed the intimate friendship of such distinguished men as Alfred Hennen, John R. Grymes, Slidell, Christian Roselius, S. S. Prentiss, Judah P. Benjamin, Mr. Bonford, Charles Gayarre, Judge Walker and other typical representatives of the old Louisiana bench and bar. He also knew, intimately, Dr. Warren Stone, Dr. W. Newton Mercer, Dr. August is to-day, the great ideal of Southern chivalry and truth. Great in defeat as he was in victory, the annals of the world's history bears no purer or greater name than that of Robert Lee. Many reminiscences did Mr. Semmes recall of Mason and Slidell, Yancey and Breckenridge, and Mallory and Stephens, Beauregard and Johnston. He remembered as though it were only yesterday, every incident of that war, and spoke of the death of Albert Sidney Johnston, the brave and peerless, whose loss, as M
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
e of, 17, 39, 139; C. S. A. prisoners at, 143. Sansom, Miss, Emma, 45. Saunders, General J. C. C., 84. Schimmelfinnig, General, Alex., 8. Semmes, Hon. T. J., Reminiscences of, 317. Semple, Major H. C., 321. Seven Days Battles, 161. Seven Pines, Battle of, 157, 158, 208, 215. Sharpsburg, Battle of, 95, 106, 164. Shenandoah, Career and Officers of, 116. Shepherdstown, Battle of, 254. Signal Corps, C. S. A., The, 130. Slaves, Proclamation freeing them, 378. Slidell, Hon., John, 191. Smith, General G. W., 158, 222. Smith, General W. F., 5, 13. Soldiers of 200 years, The greatest, 92 Southanna Bridge, Battle of, 337. South Carolina, Operations in, 1863-4, 7. South, Life in the, before 1861, 324. South Mountain Gap, Battle of, 162. South, Righteous Cause of the, 357. Spinola Family, The. 188. Spotsylvania C. H., Battle of, 170, 261, 340. Sprunt, Hon., James, 378. Starke, Colonel A. W, 3, 4 Stedman, Charles M., 334. Stewart, Colo