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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 66 6 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 55 1 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 51 29 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 34 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 31 5 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 22 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 21 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 16 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 12 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: April 19, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Slocum or search for Slocum in all documents.

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a question of time and labor, but Col. White is evidently disposed to put our forces to all the trouble possible, there seeming to be no other reason for his refusal to surrender at discretion what he must soon be forced to give up. Your correspondent left Newbern Thursday, P. M., in the steam transport Union, Capt. Chambers, who took a cargo of ordnance stores and army wagons and horses, under charge of Lieut. Flagler, of General Burnside's staff, to Havelock Station, near the head of Slocum's creek, from whence they are to be sent to the scene of operations. Atlantic and North Carolina Railroad. After the rout of the rebels at Newbern, they took away with them all the locomotives and cars of the Atlantic and North Carolina railroad (except a few platform and hand-cars) to Kinston and Goldsborough, and burned one bridge between Newbern and Kinston, besides the long bridge at Newbern. In addition to the rolling stock left by them, there are also some hand-cars, brought