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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 1.4, chapter 1.5 (search)
f unusual intelligence, and, calling one up to him, felt his head and his temples, and then turned round to Francis, and declared, in our acute hearing, that he felt assured that boy would be a prodigy of learning if he went on. Our parson--Mr. Smalley, of Cwm — unbent one day to examine us on Scripture History, and one boy so astonished him by his wonderful memory, and quick and correct answers, that he exclaimed, Why, Francis, you have quite a young Erasmus here. The famous Hicks Owen, I took to copying them, and in a few months had acquired such excellence that my reputation spread wide in our circle. Francis affected to believe that I was destined for a limner. The Bishop rewarded me with a Bible bearing his autograph. Miss Smalley, of Cwm, presented me with a drawing-book and pencils, and I was introduced to a number of notabilities around as the artist of the school. Other small accomplishments tended to bring me into prominence. My recitations were much admired. On
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.31 (search)
ll places that the eye of Heaven visits are ports and happy havens. Yet I sympathise still with that belief of my youth, that Wales, being my native-land, possessed for me superior charms to any other. Had I seen no other wondrous lands, met no other men and women with whom I could sympathise, it is probable that I should have retained the belief that Wales was the finest country in the world, and the Welsh people the best. I used to believe the Bishop was the holiest man living; the Rev. Mr. Smalley, of Cwm, the biggest man; Sam Ellis, of Llanbach, the strongest man; Hicks Owen, the finest preacher; my cousin Moses, the most scholarly; the Vale of Clwyd, the prettiest; Liverpool, the biggest and most populous town; and the Welsh people, the superior of any in the whole world. Without any effort of mine, or anybody else's, to disabuse me of these illusions, I have seen hundreds just as holy as the Bishop, bigger men than the Cwm rector, stronger men than Sam Ellis, better preac
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, Index (search)
isbury, Lord, accuses Stanley of having interests in Africa, 408; as an orator, 445, 446, 465. Sandford, General, 338. Saragossa, fighting at, 241-243. Saunderson, Colonel, 489. Scheabeddin, quoted, 371. Schnitzer, Edouard. See Emin Pasha. Seton-Karr, Mr., 474. Sherman, General W. T., 226, 227, 426. Shiloh, 186-204. Shipman, Mr., 205, 206, 212, 213. Short, Bishop, Vowler, 17, 30. Slate, James M., 169, 180, 204. Slave-trade in Africa, 344, 407, 413, 419-422, 457. Smalley, Mr., 17. Smith, Parker, 478, 480. Smith, Captain S. G., 165, 168, 188, 189. Socialism, thoughts on, 530. Soldiering, 167-215. Solomon's Throne, 248. Soul and mind, thoughts on, 521, 522. Spain, Stanley in, 240-244. Speake, James, 89, 102-105, 121. Speake, Mrs., 105, 106. Speke, Mr., 435, 462. Stairs, Lieutenant, 354, 360, 381, 390. Stanley, Denzil, Stanley's son, 483, 485, 486. Stanley, Henry Morton, his progenitors, 3, 4; dawn of consciousness, 4; earliest recollecti