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George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 24 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 8 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 7. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 8 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 4 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 4 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 4 0 Browse Search
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charge of both places, and the only companions he had during their absence were the men employed about the gin and negro houses. They were an endless source of amusement to him, though he had an unaffected sympathy with them in their sorrows. He had a lank, yellow-haired old millwright, who with his young son was working upon his cotton-gin. Mr. Davis found him an original person, and talked very often with the pair. Mr. P. had seen Mr. Davis from time to time very much absorbed in Adam Smith's Wealth of Nations, and one day requested the loan of it, which was granted. He sat mystified but silent, turning the leaves in a dazed way, while his long legs, clothed in white linsey trousers, were wound around each other. His son, Henry, a young fac-simile of his father, entered and inquired what he was reading. On being told he asked, Father, do you think that is as interesting as Charlot-t-e Temple, or Lou-i-i-sy, the Lovely Orphing? An allusion to this anecdote would always
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 6: military Polity—The means of national defence best suited to the character and condition of a country, with a brief account of those adopted by the several European powers. (search)
eans of war, with incentives very unequal, an equilibrium cannot exist; for danger and temptation are no longer opposed to each other. The preparation of states may, therefore, be equal without being equivalent, and the smaller of the two may be most liable to be drawn into a war without the means of sustaining it. The numerical relation between the entire population of a state, and the armed forces which it can maintain, must evidently vary with the wealth and pursuits of the people. Adam Smith thinks that a country purely agricultural may, at certain seasons, furnish for war one-fifth, or even in case of necessity one-fourth, of its entire population. A. commercial or manufacturing country would be unable to furnish any thing like so numerous a military force. On this account small agricultural states are sometimes able to bring into the field much larger armies than their more powerful neighbors. During the Seven Years War, Frederick supported an army equal to one-twentieth
ghout the length and breadth of the Confederate States. It is upon this, as I have stated, our social fabric is firmly planted; and I cannot permit myself to doubt the ultimate success of a full recognition of this principle throughout the civilized and enlightened world. As I have stated, the truth of this principle may be slow in development, as all truths are, and ever have been, in the various branches of science. It was so with the principles announced by Galileo — it was so with Adam Smith, and his principles of political economy. It was so with Harvey, and his theory of the circulation of the blood. It is stated that not a single one of the medical profession, living at the time of the announcement of the truths made by him, admitted them. Now, they are universally acknowledged. May we not, therefore, look with confidence to the ultimate universal acknowledgment of the truths upon which our system rests? It is the first government ever instituted upon principles in str
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Manufactures, colonial (search)
arly period regarded the North American colonies, particularly those of New England, as their rivals in navigation and trade. Child declared that there is nothing more prejudicial, and in prospect more dangerous to any mother-kingdom, than the increase of shipping in her colonies, plantations, and provinces. Dr. Davenant, who wrote later, was in accordance with these views of Child. The proceedings of the British government were generally in accordance with the views of these writers. It is believed that Adam Smith (1770) was the first English writer who dared to deny, not only the policy, but the justice of these features in the British colonial system. In his Wealth of Nations, he says, after giving an outline of that system: To prohibit a great people, however, from making all they can of every part of their own produce, or from employing their stock and industry in the way they judge most advantageous to themselves, is a manifest violation of the most sacred rights of mankind.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Stephens, Alexander Hamilton -1883 (search)
ghout the length and breadth of the Confederate States. It is upon this, as I have stated, our social fabric is firmly planted; and I cannot permit myself to doubt the ultimate success of a full recognition of this principle throughout the civilized and enlightened world. As I have stated, the truth of this principle may be slow in development, as all truths are, and ever have been, in the various branches of science. It was so with the principles announced by Galileo —it was so with Adam Smith and his principles of political economy. It was so with Harvey, and his theory of the circulation of the blood. It is stated that not a single one of the medical profession, living at the time of the announcement of the truths made by him, admitted them. Now they are universally acknowledged. May we not, therefore, look with confidence to the ultimate universal acknowledgment of the truths upon which our system rests? It is the first government ever instituted upon principles in stric
ghout the length and breadth of the Confederate States. It is upon this, as I have stated, our social fabric is firmly planted; and I cannot permit myself to doubt the ultimate success of a full recognition of this principle throughout the civilized and enlightened world. As I have stated, the truth of this principle may be slow in development, as all truths are, and ever have been, in the various branches of science. It was so with the principles announced by Galileo — it was so with Adam Smith and his principles of political economy. It was so with Harvey, and his theory of the circulation of the blood. It is stated that not a single one of the medical profession, living at the time of the announcement of the truths made by him, admitted them. Now, they are universally acknowledged. May we not therefore look with confidence to the ultimate universal acknowledgment of the truths upon which our system rests? It is the first Government ever instituted upon principles in strict
and WessonJuly 5, 1859. 24,726Ells and WhiteJuly 12, 1859. 26,919Morris and BrownJan. 24, 1860. 27,526J. M. CooperMar. 20, 1860. 28,437A. J. GibsonMay 22, 1860. 28,951E. AllenJuly 3, 1860. 29,126A. J. GibsonJuly 10, 1860. 30,079D. MooreSept. 18, 1860. 30,245E. A. PrescottOct. 2, 1860. 30,399A. J. GibsonOct. 9, 1860. 30,765C. SharpsNov. 27, 1860. 30,990Smith and WessonDec. 18, 1860. 33,328Ethan AllenSept. 24, 1861. 33,509E. AllenOct. 22, 1861. 33,836H. GrossDec. 3, 1861. 34,016A. SmithDec. 24, 1861. 34,067D. MooreJan. 7, 1862. 34,703C. E. SneiderMar. 18, 1862. 34,922C. DragerApr. 8, 1862. 35,067E. AllenApr. 29, 1862. 35,419C. W. HopkinsMay 27, 1862. 35,623L. W. PondJune 17, 1862. 35,657J. H. VickersJune 17, 1862. 36,505C. C. BrandSept. 23, 1862. 36,984S. W. WoodNov. 18, 1862. 37,004T. J. MayallNov. 25, 1862. 37,059J. RupertusDec. 2, 1862. 37,075J. JenkinsonDec. 2, 1862. 37,091A. T FreemanDec. 9, 1862. 37,551F. P. SlocumJan. 27, 1863. 37,693J. C. HoweFeb. 17
ng the tallow to flow on to the part to be lubricated, the steam-opening in the valvestem being closed by means of the screw-threaded rod e. f is the steam-escape opening. Tal′ly. A notched stick employed as a means of keeping accounts. Tally-sticks were used in ancient Egypt; one is in the Abbott Museum, New York. They were also employed by the Athenians. In England they were long issued in lieu of certificates of indebtedness to creditors of the state. In 1696, according to Adam Smith, this species of security was at 40 to 60 per cent discount, and bank-notes 20 per cent. Besides accounts, other records were formerly kept upon notched sticks, as almanacs, in which red-letter days were signified by a large notch, ordinary days by small notches, etc. Such were formerly common in most European countries. The Runic Clog-Almanack and the Saxon Reive Pope are of this class, and yet exist in Sweden, and in Staffordshire, England. Somewhat similar was the ancient Briton
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: Franklin (search)
er, Jay, Adams, Jefferson, and Washington. In England, where his affections strike such deep root that he considers establishing there his permanent abode, he is in relationship, more or less intimate, with Mandeville, Paine, Priestley, Price, Adam Smith, Robertson, Hume, Joseph Banks, Bishop Watson, Bishop Shipley, Lord Kames, Lord Shelburne, Lord Howe, Burke, and Chatham. Among Frenchmen he numbers on his list of admiring friends Vergennes, Lafayette, Mirabeau, Turgot, Quesnay, La Rochefoucanica, experimented with electricity and heat, made a tour of the Low Countries, visited the principal cities of England and Scotland, received honorary degrees from the universities, and enjoyed the society of Collinson, Priestley, Price, Hume, Adam Smith, Robertson, and Kames. He returned to America in the latter part of 1762. In 1763 he made a 1600-mile tour of the northern provinces to inspect the post-offices. In the following year he was again in the thick of Pennsylvania politics, worki
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
und of Transylvania, 18 Sigurd the Volsung, 261 Silence Dogood, 94, 113 Silsbee, Joshua, 227 Simms, W. G., 224 n., 231, 307, 308, 312-318, 319, 324 Simonides, 359 Simple Cobbler of Aggawam, the, 39 Sinners in the hands of an angry God, 60 Sir Charles Grandison, 284 Sketch Book, 240, 248, 249, 251, 255-256 Sketches from a student's Window, 240 Sketches of history, 318 Skinner, Otis, 223 Sky-walk, 288, 291 Slaves in Algiers, 226 Slender's journey, 182 Smith, Adam, 91, 97 Smith, Elihu Hubbard, 288, 290 Smith, Horace, 281 Smith, James, 281 Smith, Capt., John, 2, 15-18, 19, 225 Smith, Melanchthon, 148 Smith, Samuel, 27 Smith, Sydney, 206, 207, 208 Smith, Rev. William (1721-1803), 85, 122, 123, 216 Smith, William (1728-1793), 27, 28 Smith, William Moore, 177 Smyth, Professor A. H., 94, 94 n., 97 n., 139 n. Smyth, J. P. D., 206 Smollett, 285, 287, 297, 307 Socrates, 103, 351 Some considerations on the keeping of N
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