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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 189 43 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 75 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 60 18 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 54 18 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 35 17 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 35 19 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 33 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 32 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 2 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 10 Browse Search
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h was intended for immediate service in Texas, General Johnston was appointed as colonel, with rank from March 3, 1855. Brevet Colonel Robert E. Lee was made lieutenant-colonel; and Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel William J. Hardee and Major George H. Thomas, majors. Hardee was afterward a lieutenant-general in the Confederate army, and was always found equal to the occasion. Thomas is equally well known as a distinguished general on the Northern side. Among the captains were Earl Van Dorn, E. Kirby Smith, and N. G. Evans, who were generals in the Confederate army; and I. N. Palmer, George Stoneman, and R. W. Johnson, who held the same rank in the Union army. Among the subalterns, John B. Hood, Charles W. Field, Chambliss, and Phifer, became Southern generals; and K. Garrard and others attained the same place in the Northern army. It is doubtful whether any other one regiment furnished an equal number of distinguished officers to the two contending armies during the great civil war.
of campaign; and, defeating some of his columns, to drive him from the soil as well of Kentucky as of Tennessee. We are deficient in arms, wanting in discipline, and inferior in numbers. Private arms must supply the first want; time and the presence of an enemy, with diligence on the part of commanders, will remove the second; and public confidence will overcome the third. General Bragg brings you disciplined troops, and you will find in him the highest administrative capacity. General E. K. Smith will soon have in East Tennessee a sufficient force to create a strong diversion in your favor; or, if his strength cannot be made available in that way, you will best know how to employ it otherwise. I suppose the Tennessee or Mississippi River will be the object of the enemy's next campaign, and I trust you will be able to concentrate a force which will defeat either attempt. The fleet which you will soon have on the Mississippi River, if the enemy's gunboats ascend the Tennessee,
Mass., 37-38,270 Saint Augustine, Fl., 248 Saint Louis, Mo., 279 Savannah, Ga., 384 Sawtelle, Charles G., 355 Sayler's Creek, Va, 293 Schouler, William, 23 Scott, Winfield, 23,250,252 Seneca, Md., 404 Sheridan, Philip H., 139, 267,293, 372 Sherman, William T., 239-40,246, 263,286,353-54,362,364,366, 384,400,403-4,406 Shiloh, 301,405 Shirks, 101-5,167,175,312 Sibley, Henry, 46-47 Sick call, 172-76 Sickles, Daniel E., 157,406 Smith, Andrew J., 263 Smith, E. Kirby, 160 Soldier's Aid Society, 85 Songs: Abraham's Daughter, 215; The battle Cry of freedom, 38, 42,335; Columbia, the Gem of the Ocean, 38,335; Dead march, 158; John Brown's body, 335; Marching along, 335; Pleyel's Hymm, 158; Raw recruit, 215; The star-spangled banner, 42; Sweet by and by, 137; When Johnny comes marching home, 71,193; Yankee Doodle, 42 Southside Railroad, 350 Spotsylvania, 291,319 Stevensburg, Va., 163, 181 Suffolk, Va., 403 Sugar Loaf Mountain, Md., 404
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing armies at the first Bull Run. (search)
enton Harper; 27th Va., Lieut.-Col. John Echols; 33d Va., Col. A. C. Cummings. Loss: k, 119; w, 442 = 561. Second Brigade, Col. F. S. Bartow (k): 7th Ga., Col. Lucius J. Gartrell; 8th Ga., Lieut.-Col. W. M. Gardner. Loss: k, 60; w, 293 = 353. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. B. E. Bee (k): 4th Ala., Col. Jones (k), Col. S. R. Gist; 2d Miss., Col. W. C. Falkner; 11th Miss. (2 cos.), Lieut.-Col. P. F. Liddell; 6th N. C., Col. C. F. Fisher (k). Loss: k, 95; w, 309; m, 1 = 405. Fourth Brigade, Brig.-Gen. E. K. Smith (w), Col. Arnold Elzey: 1st Md. Battalion, Lieut.-Col. George H. Steuart; 3d Tennessee, Col. John C. Vaughn; 10th Va., Col. S. B. Gibbons; 13th Va., Col. A. P. Hill. Loss: k, 8; w, 19 = 27. Artillery: Imboden's, Stanard's, Pendleton's, Alburtis's, and Beckham's batteries. Cavalry: 1st Va., Col. J. E. B. Stuart. (Loss not specifically reported.) Total loss Army of the Shenandoah: k, 282; w, 1063; m, 1 = 1346. Total loss of the Confederate Army: killed, 387; wounded, 1582; captur
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Incidents of the first Bull Run. (search)
Incidents of the first Bull Run. John D. Imboden, Brigadier-General, C. S. A. From the day of his arrival at Winchester [see page 124], General Johnston was ceaseless in his labors to improve the efficiency of his little army, in which he was greatly assisted by several staff-officers who afterward rose to high distinction. The two most active of these subordinates were Majors W. H. C. Whiting and E. Kirby Smith, the former of whom as a major-general fell mortally wounded at the capture of Fort Fisher in North Carolina, and the latter as a lieutenant-general commanded the Trans-Mississippi army when the final collapse came. During our withdrawal from Harper's Ferry, on June 16th, we were deflected from our direct line of march, and held in line of battle a day at Bunker Hill, a few miles north of Winchester, to receive an expected assault from General Patterson, who had crossed the Potomac, but who went back without attacking us. Again on July 2d we were marched to Darksville,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Responsibilities of the first Bull Run. (search)
eet, and Jones to hold their brigades south of Bull Run, and ready to move. When Bonham's two regiments appeared soon after, Cocke's brigade was ordered into action on our right. Fisher's North Carolina regiment coming up, Bonham's two regiments were directed against the Federal right, and Fisher's was afterward sent in the same direction; for the enemy's strongest efforts seemed to be directed against our left, as if to separate us from Manassas Junction. About 3:30 o'clock, General E. K. Smith arrived with three regiments of Elzey's brigade, coming from Manassas Junction. He was instructed, through a staff-officer sent forward to meet him, to form on the left of our line, his left thrown forward, and to attack the enemy in flank. At his request I joined him, directed his course, and gave him these instructions. Before the formation was completed, he fell severely wounded, and while falling from his horse directed Colonel Elzey to take command. That officer appreciated t
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Vicksburg during the siege. (search)
necessary to avoid them, kept the besieged alive. Every day, too, somebody would start or speed a new story of deliverance from without, that stirred up, although for a fitful season only, the hearts ,bowed down by deep despair. Now it was E. Kirby Smith, and now Joe Johnston, who was at the gates. The faith that something would and must be done to save the city was desperately clung to till the last. It probably never had deep roots in the reason of the generals, the men in the lines, or t of Vicksburg, and Pemberton refuses I Another said Pemberton had answered with profane violence the charge of his men shooting poisoned balls. In the city the reports took shape mainly with reference to the supposed movements of Johnston and E. K. Smith. One day the forces had gone to Memphis, to cut Grant off from his supplies, a report that provoked a poem from a gallant, gay boy named Cannon (afterward killed), which had this refrain: Damn Memphis and strategy-Vicksburg's the place, An
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 4: details of the battle of Manassas. (search)
ke's regiments were brought up, as also the seven companies of the 8th Virginia, under Colonel Hunter; the three companies of the 49th Virginia Regiment, under Colonel Smith; the 6th North Carolina Regiment, under Colonel Fisher; and two of Bonham's regiments, under Colonel Kershaw; and engaged in the battle. The fighting was ee regiments of Elzey's brigade — which had arrived at the junction by the railroad and been promptly moved to the battlefield under the direction of Brigadier General E. Kirby Smith --came upon the field in rear of our line, and after General Smith had been wounded were moved to our left, under command of Colonel Elzey, just in tGeneral Smith had been wounded were moved to our left, under command of Colonel Elzey, just in time to meet and repulse a body of the enemy which had overlapped that flank. A short time afterwards, while the enemy was preparing for a last effort, my brigade arrived on the field, and operated on the left of Elzey's brigade just as the enemy began his attack. He had been repulsed, not routed. When, however, the retreat be
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 5: operations along Bull Run. (search)
and near that place was organized into four divisions of three brigades each and two corps. Bonham's brigade was attached to Van Dorn's division, and the command of the other divisions was given to Major Generals G. W. Smith, Longstreet, and E. Kirby Smith, respectively. Van Dorn's and Longstreet's divisions constituted the first corps under General Beauregard, and the other two divisions constituted the second corps under the temporary command of Major General G. W. Smith. About the same 5th Alabama Regiment had been made brigadier general and assigned to the command of Ewell's brigade, Ewell being temporarily assigned to a brigade in Longstreet's division, and subsequently made major general and transferred to the command of E. K. Smith's division, when the latter officer was sent to Tennessee. The affair of Evans' command with the enemy at Ball's Bluff occurred on the 21st of October, and Stuart's affair with the enemy at Drainesville occurred on the 20th of December. T
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Sherman and Johnston-Johnston's surrender to Sherman-capture of Mobile-Wilson's expedition — capture of Jefferson Davis--General Thomas's qualities-estimate of General Canby (search)
20] surrendered on the 21st of April. Here news was received of the negotiations for the surrender of Johnston's army. Wilson belonged to the military division commanded by Sherman, and of course was bound by his terms. This stopped all fighting. General Richard Taylor had now become the senior Confederate officer still at liberty east of the Mississippi River, and on the 4th of May he surrendered everything within the limits of this extensive command [at Citronelle, Alabama]. General E. Kirby Smith surrendered the trans-Mississippi department on the 26th of May, leaving no other Confederate army at liberty to continue the war. Wilson's raid resulted in the capture of the fugitive president of the defunct confederacy before he got out of the country. This occurred at Irwinsville, Georgia, on the 11th of May [10th]. For myself, and I believe Mr. Lincoln shared the feeling, I would have been very glad to have seen Mr. Davis succeed in escaping, but for one reason: I feared th
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