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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 189 43 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 75 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 60 18 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 54 18 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 35 17 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 35 19 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 33 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 32 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 2 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 8 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for E. Kirby Smith or search for E. Kirby Smith in all documents.

Your search returned 17 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General S. D. Lee's report of the siege of Vicksburg. (search)
o our entrenchments around Vicksburg. My brigade was ordered to cover the retreat across the river after the works were carried, and was accordingly posted along the banks for that purpose, where it remained until relieved by Baldwin's brigade, Smith's division, which brought up the rear. By an error in the transmission of an order, the Twenty-third Alabama regiment, Col. F. K. Beck, remained at the bridge after Baldwin's brigade had been withdrawn, and gallantly engaged the enemy during theon with skill. Cols. Beck and Shelly were particularly brave and vigilant. Col. Pettus, Twentieth Alabama, won the admiration of every one by his daring on the 22d of May, and by his uniform good conduct during the remainder of the siege. Lt.-Cols. Smith, Thirtieth Alabama, Arrington, Thirty-first Alabama; Timmons and ----, of Waul's Texas legion; Maj. Mattisin, Thirty-first Alabama; Capts. Francis, Thirtieth Alabama, and Brewer, Forty-sixth Alabama; Captains Waddell and Haynes, and Lieuts.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
ate Reports of the Engagement on James' Island. Report of Brig.-Gen. Morgan and Subordinate Reports of the Expedition into Kentucky. Maj.-Gen. Magruder's Report and Subordinate Reports of the Operations on the Peninsula. Report of Gen. Pemberfon and the Subordinate Reports in reference to the Expedition to Pinckney Island. Report of Col. J. H. Morgan of theAffair at Gallatin, Tennessee. Report of Brig.-Gen. Maxby of Operations of the Army at Bridgeport and Battle Creek. Report of Gen. E. Kirby Smith and Subordinate Reports of the Battle of Richmond,Kentucky. Answer of Col. Forrestto Interrogatories propounded by Congression al Committee, in regard to the Management of the Quartermaster and Commissary Departments, aboutthe time of the surrender of Nashville. Official Reports of Gens. Johnston and Beauregard of the Battle of Manassas, July 21st, 1861. Also Official Reports of all the other Battles fought in 1861. Report of Gen. Bragg and Subordinate Reports of the Battle of Chi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Leading Confederates on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
ws a decrease of 1,615; but that in Hoke's and Smith's brigades was caused, mainly, by the absence oke's — the latter commanded by Colonel Avery; Smith's brigade being posted near the York road to pom Seminary Hill coming back also. I sent for Smith's brigade, and for my artillery also; but SmitSmith did not come, and I sent a second time. Before the artillery came to me, the Federal troops passthe shells bursting around us, the aide of General Smith came to me in a gallop and under great excitement, and told me that General Smith said the enemy was advancing on the York road with infantry cavalry, and he could not hold him back. General Smith had not obeyed my order when I sent for hi turned out that the skirmishers were some General Smith had sent out, which Gordon was having movefter the enemy was driven through the town, if Smith bad come to me with his brigade when sent for,n as Gordon's ammunition was replenished. General Smith had been posted so as to protect our left [3 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Supplement to General Early's Review.-reply to General Longstreet. (search)
cked him to regain the works captured by Stuart the evening before. This is all that is given of Ewell's statement, and then follows an extract from Meade's testimony. The part of Colonel Taylor's statement, put in brackets above, was omitted in the article. Here is Ewell's whole statement as contained in his report: I was ordered to renew my attack at daylight Friday morning, and as Johnson's position was the only one affording hopes of doing this to advantage, he was reinforced by Smith's brigade of Early's division, and Daniel's and Rodes' (old) brigades of Rodes' division. Half an hour after Johnson attacked (on Friday morning), and when too late to recall him, I received notice that General Longstreet would not attack until 10 o'clock; but, as it turned out, his attack was delayed till after 2 o'clock. Just before the time fixed for Johnson's advance the enemy attacked him to regain the works captured by Stuart the evening before. They were repulsed with very heavy