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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 189 43 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 75 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 60 18 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 54 18 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 35 17 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 35 19 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 33 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 32 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 2 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 10 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865. You can also browse the collection for E. Kirby Smith or search for E. Kirby Smith in all documents.

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ents, and proposes a plan of attack and defence to the War Department. his Proposals not heeded. General Grant's Army crossing the James. General Beauregard telegraphs Generals Lee and Bragg to that effect. his force at Petersburg. attack by Smith's Corps on the 15th. arrival of Hagood's brigade, of Hoke's division. General Beauregard Notifies the War Department and General Lee of the necessity of calling Bushrod Johnson from the Bermuda hundred lines. War Department Declines the responilure of the Confederate authorities to comply with General Beauregard's plan of operations, Butler, though badly beaten, was able to effect his retreat upon his strong base at Bermuda Hundreds, and could safely (as he did) detach from that point Smith's corps of 16,000 men, to aid General Grant in the effort made, on June 3d, at Cold Harbor, to break through General Lee's defensive lines, on that side of the James. Meanwhile, Butler, still 13,000 strong, continued to be a threat to the safety
arge the Federals out of the mine; but he had no sooner reached the open ground, followed by Colonel Smith, of the 26th South Carolina, and half a dozen men, in execution of this movement, than he fetements. See Appendix. Colonel F. W. McMaster, on whom now devolved the command, despatched Colonel Smith, with the 26th and three companies of the 17th, by the trench and covered way on the left, tside of the crater they were swept by such a fire from the batteries and infantry, including Colonel Smith's force, in the ravine in rear, and the 59th Virginia, under Captain Wood, formed in a ditchho lay down in the shallow ravine, to the rear of Elliott's salient, held by the force under Colonel Smith, there to await the remainder of the division. Colonel McMaster's statement. See Appendip. The 25th and 49th North Carolina, and the 26th and part of the 17th South Carolina, all under Smith, which were formed on Mahone's left, likewise joined in the counter-movement, and three-fourths
ippi Department. his communication to General E. Kirby Smith. he urges that two or more divisions eaves for Charleston. he again Presses General E. K. Smith to forward his troops. the latter Consans-Mississippi Department, then under General E. Kirby Smith, and, with that rapidity of strategic g General Thomas at Nashville. Cannot General E. Kirby Smith reinforce General Hood in Middle Tennehe West, Montgomery, Dec. 3d, 1864. To General E. Kirby Smith, Comdg. Trans-Miss. Dept.: General, the President, and, though he doubted General E. Kirby Smith's willingness to respond to the emerge rapid means the following despatch to General E. Kirby Smith, Shreveport, La.: If practicable, p. 299. But no glad tidings came. General E. K. Smith could not be moved to action. He allow reported. It is to be regretted that General E. Kirby Smith, although, in many respects, an officeesult of the war! See, in Appendix, General E. Kirby Smith's reasons for not acceding to General [7 more...]
nl. R. E. Lee, Shady Grove Church, Va.: Prisoners and deserters report Gillmore with two divisions—about 8000 men —still in my front. One of his divisions with Smith's corps—say 16,000 men in all—have gone to White House, probably to form junction with Grant. I have left here only one division, which can be moved to north side appreciate the difficulties under which I labor, and believe in an honest desire on my part to assist you, I remain, Your friend and obedient servant, E. Kirby Smith, Genl. Genl. G. T. Beauregard, Comdg. Military Division of the West. Appendix to chapter XLIII. Telegram. Headquarters Army of Tennessee, Dec. 12thment, C. S. A., Richmond, Va., Dec. 4th, 1864. Genl. G. T. Beauregard, Montgomery, Ala.: Your telegram of the 2d inst. is referred to me for answer. If General E. K. Smith can now act as you suggest, it would be well he should do so. You are authorized so to inform him, and to request his prompt action. He has, however, fail