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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Your search returned 11 results in 6 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cabinet, President's (search)
exander H. H. Stewart Sept.12, 1850 Robert McClelland March 7, 1853 Jacob Thompson March 6, 1857 Caleb B. Smith March 5, 1861 John P. Usher Jan. 8, 1863 James Harlan May 15, 1865 Orville H. Browning July 27, 1866 Jacob D. Cox March 5, 1869 Columbus Delano Nov. 1, 1870 Zachariah Chandler Oct. 19, 1875 Carl Schurz March12, 1877 Samuel J. KirkwoodMarch 5, 1881 Henry M. Teller April 6, 1882 L. Q. C. Lamar March 6, 1885 William F. Vilas Jan. 16, 1888 John W. Noble March 5, 1889 Hoke SmithMarch 6, 1893 David R. Francis Aug.24, 1896 Cornelius N. Bliss March 5, 1897 Ethan A. Hitchcock Dec. 21, 1898 March 5, 1901 Postmasters-General. Samuel OsgoodSept.26, 1789 Timothy PickeringAug. 12, 1791 Joseph Habersham Feb.25, 1795 Gideon Granger Nov.28, 1801 Return J. Meigs, Jr March17, 1814 John McLean June 26, 1823 William T. BarryMarch 9, 1829 Amos Kendall May 1, 1835 John M. Niles. May 25, 1840 Francis GrangerMarch 6, 1841 Name.Appointed. Charles A. Wicklif
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Smith, Hoke 1855- (search)
Smith, Hoke 1855- Lawyer; born in Newton, N. C., Sept. 2, 1855; was educated at home; removed to Atlanta, Ga., where he was admitted to the bar and began practice; in 1887-98 was proprietor of the Atlanta Journal; and in 1893-96 was Secretary of the Department of the Interior, resigning to resume private practice.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
n, arrives in England on a visit......July 8, 1896 Democratic National Convention meets at Chicago, Ill. Platform adopted......July 9, 1896 The Venezuelan arbitration correspondence made public......July 17, 1896 The People's Party National Convention meets at St. Louis, Mo.......July 24, 1896 President Cleveland issues a proclamation warning Cuban filibusters......July 30, 1896 The Rev. Sebastian Martinelli appointed papal delegate in the United States......July 30, 1896 Hoke Smith, Secretary of the Interior, resigns; David R. Francis appointed his successor......Aug. 22, 1896 LI Hung Chang arrives in New York......Aug. 28, 1896 [Received by President Cleveland, Aug. 29.] National Democratic party meets at Indianapolis, Ind. (Declares for the gold standard)......Sept. 3, 1896 Appropriation for the Tennessee Centennial Exposition granted......Dec. 22, 1896 Arbitration treaty between the United States and Great Britain signed at Washington, D. C.......J
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 3 (search)
yme— Both patriots—both Virginians true— Both Rebels —both sublime. Banquet and toasts. After the exercises at the Capitol the society and its guests repaired to the Kimball House, where an elegant banquet was spread. It was the first annual banquet of the society, and no pains were spared to make it a perfect success in every particular. The speakers were as follows: Captain W. Gordon McCabe, Governor W. J. Northen, Mayor W. A. Hempphill, Colonel W. L. Calhoun, Hon. Clark Howell, Hoke Smith, Rev. Dr. George B. Strickland, and Major J. C. Courtney. Baltimore. Fall in was the command at night of General Bradley T. Johnson, as he looked over a great mass of talking, hand-shaking, congratulating Confederate veterans. They had met to celebrate the anniversary of the birthday of General Robert E. Lee. The command, as between 1861 and 1865, was promptly obeyed, and the party of more than two hundred gallant veterans marched by twos into the great dining-hall of the Carrol
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Nineteenth of January. (search)
. They bravely defended the old Commonwealth, and were sometimes captured themselves by her fair daughters. Adjutant-General John Milledge. 8. The Confederate Veterans. True in war, true in peace, they hail with a special pride and greet with peculiar joy this natal day of the great Confederate chief. Colonel W. L. Calhoun. 9. The bar. In peace, in war, and in the halls of national legislation. Of the law no less can be said than this: That her seat is in the bosom of God, and her voice the harmony of the universe. Hon. Hoke Smith, editor of the Journal. 10. The Sons of Confederate Veterans. May they ever be true to the principles for which their fathers fought, bled, and died. Hon. Benjamin M. Blackburn, editor of the Herald. 11. Old Virginia Brag. Sometimes fervent, always overdone, but ever excusable, because we have something to brag on in the hallowed traditions, glorious history, grand men, and noble women of the peerless old Commonwealth. Dr. J. William Jones.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General R. F. Hoke's last address [from the Richmond, Va., times, April 9, 1893.] (search)
General R. F. Hoke's last address [from the Richmond, Va., times, April 9, 1893.] To his division near Greensboro, N. C., May 1, 1865. As the 9th will be the anniversary of Lee's surrender, it will be in order to publish everything of historical interest pertaining to the closing scenes of the war between the States. I enclose you the farewell address of General R. F. Hoke, a gallant North Carolinian, and an uncle of the Secretary of the Interior, Hoke Smith, of whom the Northern papers wished to know something a short time since. General Lee sent General Hoke, with his division, to relieve Pickett's division, near Plymouth, N. C., where he (Hoke) covered himself with glory by storming the Federal works, and capturing almost three thousand prisoners. His gallant division took part in the battle of Brentonsville, under Joe Johnston, and distinguished themselves as they had done before on so many sanguinary fields in Virginia. The address is as follows: R. S. B. Findowri