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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 34 4 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 31 17 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 24 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 21 9 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 18 2 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 17 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 15 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 13 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 13 11 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 12 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman .. You can also browse the collection for John E. Smith or search for John E. Smith in all documents.

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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, chapter 14 (search)
ision, commanded by Major-General Fred Steele; and his three brigades by Colonel Manter, Colonel Charles R. Wood, and Brigadier-General John M. Thayer. The Second Division, commanded by Major-General Frank P. Blair; and his three brigades by Colonel Giles A. Smith, Colonel Thomas Kilby Smith, and Brigadier-General Hugh Ewing. The Third Division, commanded by Brigadier-General J. M. Tuttle; and his three brigades by Brigadier-General R. P. Buckland, Colonel J. A. Mower, and Brigadier-General John E. Smith. My own staff then embraced: Dayton, McCoy, and Hill, aides; J. H. Hammond, assistant adjutant-general; Sanger, inspector-general; McFeeley, commissary; J. Condit Smith, quartermaster; Charles McMillan, medical director; Ezra Taylor, chief of artillery;----Neely, ordnance-officer; Jenney and Pitzman, engineers. By this time it had become thoroughly demonstrated that we could not divert the main river Mississippi, or get practicable access to the east bank of the Yazoo, in
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, chapter 15 (search)
to conflict in their meaning, and that General John E. Smith's division (of General McPherson's coreenth Corps, at Vicksburg; and that of General John E. Smith, already started for Memphis, was styleneral command of Major-General Blair. General John E. Smith's division covered the working-party ell my part in time; only one division (General John E. Smith's) was in position. General Ewing wasntially Chickamauga Creek; the centre, General John E. Smith, in columns, doubled on the centre, atd the gap to Chickamauga Creek, two of General John E. Smith's were drawn back to the base in reserpported by the two reserve brigades of General John E. Smith. The sun had hardly risen before Geogress to the right, and about 2 P. M. General John E. Smith, judging the battle to be most severe umns of General Corse, Colonel Loomis, and General Smith, were not repulsed. They engaged in a cloell. When the two reserve brigades of General John E. Smith fell back as described, the enemy made[5 more...]
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, Chapter 16: Atlanta campaign-battles about Kenesaw Mountain. June, 1864. (search)
e also so far from Nashville and Chattanooga that we were naturally sensitive for the safety of our railroad and depots, so that the left (McPherson) was held very strong. About this time came reports that a large cavalry force of the enemy had passed around our left flank, evidently to strike this very railroad somewhere below Chattanooga. I therefore reenforced the cavalry stationed from Resaca to Cassville, and ordered forward from Huntsville, Alabama, the infantry division of General John E. Smith, to hold Kingston securely. While we were thus engaged about Kenesaw, General Grant had his hands full with Lee, in Virginia. General Halleck was the chief of staff at Washington, and to him I communicated almost daily. I find from my letter-book that on the 21st of June I reported to him tersely and truly the condition of facts on that day: This is the nineteenth day of rain, and the prospect of fair weather is as far off as ever. The roads are impassable; the fields and woods
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 20 (search)
e railroad-depot, while the rest of the army should move bodily to some point on the Macon Railroad below East Point. Luckily, I learned just then that the enemy's cavalry, under General Wheeler, had made a wide circuit around our left flank, and had actually reached our railroad at Tilton Station, above Resaca, captured a drove of one thousand of our beef-cattle, and was strong enough to appear before Dalton, and demand of its commander, Colonel Raum, the surrender of the place. General John E. Smith, who was at Kingston, collected together a couple of thousand men, and proceeded in cars to the relief of Dalton, when Wheeler retreated northward toward Cleveland. On the 16th another detachment of the enemy's cavalry appeared in force about Allatoona and the Etowah bridge, when I became fully convinced that Hood had sent all of his cavalry to raid upon our railroads. For some days our communication with Nashville was interrupted by the destruction of the telegraph-lines, as well
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 21 (search)
ebel army as it fell back before us somewhere near Cassville, and they wanted to obtain the body, having learned from a comrade where it was buried. I gave them permission to go by rail to the rear, with a note to the commanding officer, General John E. Smith, at Cartersville, requiring him to furnish them an escort and an ambulance for the purpose. I invited them to take dinner with our mess, and we naturally ran into a general conversation about politics and the devastation and ruin caused ot better execute the plan of my letter sent you by Colonel Porter, and leave General Thomas, with the troops now in Tennessee, to defend the State? He will have an ample force when the reenforcements ordered reach Nashville. I found General John E. Smith at Cartersville, and on the 11th rode on to Kingston, where I had telegraphic communications in all directions. From General Corse, at Rome, I learned that Hood's army had disappeared, but in what direction he was still in doubt; and I
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 22 (search)
rienced officers, fully competent to their command. The right wing was composed of the Fifteenth Corps, Major-General P. J. Osterhaus commanding, and the Seventeenth Corps, Major-General Frank P. Blair commanding. The left wing was composed of the Fourteenth Corps, Major-General Jefferson C. Davis commanding, and the Twentieth Corps, Brigadier-General A. S. Williams commanding. The Fifteenth Corps had four divisions, commanded by Brigadier-Generals Charles R. Woods, W. B. Hazen, John E. Smith, and John M. Corse. The Seventeenth Corps had three divisions, commanded by Major-General J. A. Mower, and Brigadier-Generals M. D. Leggett and Giles A. Smith. The Fourteenth Corps had three divisions, commanded by Brigadier-Generals W. P. Carlin, James D. Morgan, and A. Baird. The Twentieth Corps had also three divisions, commanded by Brigadier-Generals N. J. Jackson, John W. Geary, and W. T. Ward. The cavalry division was held separate, subject to my own orders. It was com
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 23 (search)
neral Beauregard had come from the direction of Tennessee, and had assumed the general command of all the troops designed to resist our progress. The heavy winter rains had begun early in January, rendered the roads execrable, and the Savannah River became so swollen that it filled its many channels, overflowing the vast extent of rice-fields that lay on the east bank. This flood delayed our departure two weeks; for it swept away our pontoon-bridge at Savannah, and came near drowning John E. Smith's division of the Fifteenth Corps, with several heavy trains of wagons that were en route from Savannah to Pocotaligo by the old causeway. General Slocum had already ferried two of his divisions across the river, when Sister's Ferry, about forty miles above Savannah, was selected for the passage of the rest of his wing and of Kilpatrick's cavalry. The troops were in motion for that point before I quitted Savannah, and Captain S. B. Luce, United States Navy, had reported to me with a
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, Chapter 22: campaign of the Carolinas. February and March, 1866. (search)
he former. The right wing, less Corse's division, Fifteenth Corps, was grouped at or near Pocotaligo, South Carolina, with its wagons filled with food, ammunition, and forage, all ready to start, and only waiting for the left wing, which was detained by the flood in the Savannah River. It was composed as follows: Fifteenth Corps, Major-General John A. Logan. First Division, Brigadier-General Charles R. Woods; Second Division, Major-General W. B. Hazen; Third Division, Brigadier-General John E. Smith; Fourth Division, Brigadier-General John M. Corse. Artillery brigade, eighteen guns, Lieutenant-Colonel W. H. Ross, First Michigan Artillery. Seventeenth Corps, Major-General Frank P. Blair, Jr. First Division, Major-General Joseph A. Mower; Second Division, Brigadier-General M. F. Force; Fourth Division, Brigadier-General Giles A. Smith. Artillery brigade, fourteen guns, Major A. C. Waterhouse, First Illinois Artillery. The left wing, with Corse's division and Kilpat
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 25 (search)
inois Infantry. 116th Illinois Infantry. 127th Illinois Infantry 30th Ohio Infantry. 57th Ohio Infantry. Second Brigade. Colonel W. S. Jones. 37th Ohio Infantry. 47th Ohio Infantry. 53d Ohio Infantry. 54th Ohio Infantry. 83d Indiana Infantry. 111th Illinois Infantry. Third Brigade. Brigadier-General J. M. Oliver. 15th Michigan Infantry. 70th Ohio Infantry. 48th Illinois Infantry. 90th Illinois Infantry. 99th Indiana Infantry. Third division. Brevet Major-General J. E. Smith. First Brigade. Brigadier-General W. T. Clark. 18th Wisconsin Infantry. 59th Indiana Infantry. 63d Illinois Infantry. 48th Indiana Infantry. 93d Illinois Infantry. Second Brigade. Colonel J. E. Tourtellotte 56th Illinois Infantry. 10th Iowa Infantry. 80th Ohio Infantry. 17th Iowa Infantry. Battalion 26th Missouri Infantry. Battalion 10th Missouri Infantry. 4th Minnesota Infantry. Fourth division. Brevet Major-General John M. Corse. First Brigade. Brig.-Gen.