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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 55 9 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 50 18 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 39 11 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 37 13 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 25 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 19 11 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 18 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 15 11 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 13 1 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 13 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Morgan L. Smith or search for Morgan L. Smith in all documents.

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ve on the left of the enemy's position by the time he was engaged in front; and I ordered Gen. Morgan L. Smith's brigade, with Bouton's battery, to follow the main road, drive back a brigade of the enforces were put in motion at three P. M., Gen. Denver's forces taking the right-hand road, and Gen. Smith's the direct main road. On reaching the causeway, Gen. Smith deployed his skirmishers forwardGen. Smith deployed his skirmishers forward, and sent out his advanceguard. The column advanced, and the skirmishers became engaged at once. The firing was very brisk, but the enemy's pickets were driven steadily back till they reached the pad of Gen. Denver's column reached its position as the enemy was beginning to retreat. Gen. Morgan L. Smith conducted the advance of his brigade handsomely, and the chief work and loss fell upon hiGens. Hurlbut or Denver's commands in their flank movements on Russell's; but the loss in Gen. Morgan L. Smith's brigade was pretty heavy--ten killed and thirty-one wounded, a list of whom will accomp
ns to march in perfect silence from our lines at eight A. M., keeping well under cover as he approached the field; Gen. Morgan L. Smith's brigade, (First,) with Barrett's and Waterhouse's batteries, to move along the main road, keeping his force wellBrig.-Gen. Veatch's brigade to move from Gen. Hurlbut's lines through the woods on the left of and connecting with General M. L. Smith's, and Gen. John A. Logan's brigade to move down to Bowie Hill Cut of the Mobile and Ohio Railroad, and thence fort by shallow rifle-pits, the trees being felled so as to give a good field of fire to and beyond the main road. General M. L. Smith's brigade moved rapidly down the main road, entering the first redoubt of the enemy at seven A. M. It was completeed, who did not have the slightest intimation of their purpose. Finding Corinth abandoned by the enemy, I ordered Gen. M. L. Smith to pursue on the Ripley road, by which it appeared they had taken the bulk of their artillery. Capt. Hammond, my
ers Fifth division army of Tennessee, camp before Corinth, May 30. Major-Gen. W. T. Sherman, commanding Fifth Division: General: I have the honor to report that, in obedience to your orders, at half-past 6 A. M. today I started to join Brig.-Gen. M. L. Smith, commanding the First brigade, in his march on Corinth. Proceeding as rapidly as possible to about half a mile from the edge of the village, I found him with the Fifty-fourth Ohio, Colonel T. Kirby Smith, commanding, in the advance. Skimanding the surrender of the city and its defences, has been received. In regard to the surrender of the defences, I have to reply that having been ordered here to hold these defences, it is my intention to do so as long as it is in my power. M. L. Smith, Brigadier-General Commanding --Mobile Advertiser, May 22. Doc. 112.-a case of rebel treachery. Firing upon a flag of truce, May 19. The following particulars are given by the Fortress Monroe correspondent of the Baltimore American:
Doc. 95.-occupation of Corinth, Miss. Adjt.-General Hammond's report. see General Sherman's report, p. 151, ante. headquarters Fifth division army of Tennessee, camp before Corinth, May 30. Major-Gen. W. T. Sherman, commanding Fifth Division: General: I have the honor to report that, in obedience to your orders, at half-past 6 A. M. today I started to join Brig.-Gen. M. L. Smith, commanding the First brigade, in his march on Corinth. Proceeding as rapidly as possible to about half a mile from the edge of the village, I found him with the Fifty-fourth Ohio, Colonel T. Kirby Smith, commanding, in the advance. Skirmishers deployed two hundred and fifty yards on each side of the road and in the front. The town was on fire in various parts, and evidences of sudden flight were abundant, large quantities of quartermaster's and commissary stores being partially destroyed. A citizen informed us that the main body of the rebel troops had left about two o'clock in the night
s of Vicksburgh, and that you may have a full reply to said communication, I have to state that Mississippians don't know and refuse to learn how to surrender to an enemy. If Commodore Farragut or Brig.-Gen. Butler can teach them, let them come and try. As to the defences of Vicksburgh, I respectfully refer you to the reply of Brigadier-General Smith, commanding forces at Vicksburgh, herewith enclosed. Respectfully, James L. Autry, Military Governor and Commandant Post. headquarters defences Vicksburgh, Miss., May 18, 1862. S. Phillips Lee, U. S.N., Commanding Advance Naval Division: sir: Your communication of this date, addressed To the authorities of Vicksburgh, demanding the surrender of the city and its defences, has been received. In regard to the surrender of the defences, I have to reply that having been ordered here to hold these defences, it is my intention to do so as long as it is in my power. M. L. Smith, Brigadier-General Commanding --Mobile Advertiser, May 22.
and small arms — this, too, with our miscellaneous crew, who had never, for the most part, been on board a ship, or at big guns. I am, General, very respectfully, your obedient servant, (Signed) J. N. Brown, Lieutenant Commanding. To Brig.-Gen. M. L. Smith, Commanding Defences at Vicksburgh. A true copy: J. F. Girault, A. A. General. C. S. Gunboat Arkansas, Vicksburgh, July 23, 1862. sir: I beg leave herewith to send a list of names of the killed and wounded of the detachment who so nobth Louisiana volunteers. Total wounded--four. Total killed and wounded--nine. I regret the loss of these men to the vessel and to their country. They fought well. Very respectfully, (Signed) J. N. Brown, Commander C. S. N. To Brig.-Gen. M. L. Smith, Commanding at Vicksburgh. A true copy: J. F. Girault, Assistant Adjutant-General. General Van Dorn's despatch. Vicksburgh, July 15. The sloop-of-war Arkansas, under cover of our batteries, ran gloriously through twelve or thi