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cutor to estate of Sally Mackie944.10 Aaron Dickson92106.00 John Davenport17209.00 Nahum Ball82175.38 Elizabeth Estabrook89 bal.21.74 Ephraim Frost11235.00 Seth Frost, Jr.4486.00 Ichabod Fessenden73139.00 T. Hutchinson & W. Adams, Jr.26131.00 William Hill69165.00 William Hill, Jr.4388.00 James Otis16207.00 Jonas Peirce40142.00 James Perry58170.00 George Prentiss66183.00 George Prentiss, Jr.61103.00 Richard Sullivan87184.00 John & William Swan22187.00 Reuben Swan21185.00 Sarah Smith68129.00 Benjamin Teel84166.00 Peter Tufts, Jr.86157.00 Joel Tufts5 gal.100.00 Thomas Russell31206.00 Daniel Russell101.64 Edward Russell & Jeremiah his son78124.99 Samuel Locke6239.00 Joseph Locke, Jr.38152.00 Ebenezer Lane54166.00 Walter Russell70145.00 Noah Russell71168.00 James Russell67157.00 Jas. Russell & son Walter11 gal.101.00 Solomon Prentiss & Nathan Robbins5776.32 Daniel Reed64132.00 Amos Warren79122.22 Jonathan Whittemore32 Samuel Whittemore80146.00 Amos Whi
arrant for the arrest of all the parties found in the house. About 2 o'clock it was surrounded by the police and armed guard, and the inmates, male and female, marched off to the cage, as persons of evil name, fame, and reputation. The men gave the names of Wilson Williams, George Grase, Benedict Howard, John F. Peregey, Edward Lightfoot, John Harrison, and Frank Gillian. The women registered as A. E. Thomas, Mary Jones, Lissy Hodges, Maggie Clark, Lucretia Bywaters, (alias Sue Price,) Sarah Smith, Mary Davis, Emma Marsh, Nellie Porter, and Jenny Barnes. Early Sunday morning the cage being too crowded, most of the prisoners were sent to the city jail. The unfortunate man who was shot was known as Capt. J. O. Withmell, and hailed from Louisville, Ky. After being shot he was carried to his room at the Exchange Hotel, and Dr. Conway called in to attend him. The ball was found to have been received in the back, and was extracted from the surface of the abdomen, having passed through
the pistol. Did not get up. Do not know what direction it was in. Did not know that a man was shot until next morning. Mary Jones deposed: Don't know anything about it. Went to bed at 11 o'clock. Heard no noise or knocking at the door. Did not look out. Had no curiosity. Heard no one making any observations. Have no recollection of having seen the deceased. Lizzie Hodges deposed, that she know nothing about the shooting. Heard no knocking or nothing until the next day. Sarah Smith deposed, that she knew nothing of the affair. Heard no pistol shot off. Retired to bed early and was asleep. Having heard the above testimony, the jury returned a verdict that the deceased came to his death from a pistol-shot wound, the ball entering his back and passing through his body, and that it was fired by some person to the jury unknown. Afterwards the jury drew up and signed the following paper as an addenda to the verdict: "The jury of inquest in the case of J.
That wonderful Newburyport (hode Island) man keeps up his cold bathing. Runs ten miles, jumps into the surf off Plum island, and then runs home, every morning. His health is perfect, and his name is Smith.
back to the committee from whence it emanated for modification. A message was received from the Governor, in response to a resolution of the House inquiring what course the Governor had pursued in regard to securing from the Confederate Government the exemption of certain State officers. The Governor responds that he has not obeyed the instructions of the Legislature; and further intimates that the Legislature lacks the right and the power to demand it of him, alleging that while the Legislature may increase his duties, it cannot clothe him with extra power. Finally, the Governor concludes that the resolution "directing the Governor to certify," etc., is not the language of official courtesy. The communication was laid on the table and ordered to be printed. On motion of Mr. Deane, of Campbell, the House resolved into secret session. When the doors re-opened the body adjourned. [Dr. Smith, the new member elect from Amherst, is detained from his seat by sickness.]
Disappeared, last Tuesday night, from my residence, at Mrs. Mayo's, on Church Hill, near the corner of Grace and Twenty-sixth streets, my servant (free) girl, Sarah, with a half-dozen Silver Table Spoons. She is tall and thick-set; black; woolly headed, and is easily confused when spoken to. She is known by the name of Sarah Smith, and is supposed to be trying to make her way to the Yankees or temporarily lurking in the city. The spoons carried off by her were heavy, considerably worn, handle heads clipped, and marked "L. A. D." A liberal reward will be paid for the apprehension of the negro and return of the spoons. ja 12--2t*
Disappeared, last Tuesday night, from my residence, at Mrs. Mayo's, on Church Hill, near the corner of Grace and Twenty-sixth streets, my servant (free) girl, Sarah, with a half-dozen Silver Table Spoons. She is tail and thick-set; black; woolly headed, and is easily confused when spoken to. She is known by the name of Sarah Smith, and is supposed to be trying to make her way to the Yankees or temporarily lurking in the city. The spoons carried off by her were heavy, considerably worn, handle heads clipped, and marked "L. A. D." A liberal reward will be paid for the apprehension of the negro and return of the spoons. ja 12--2t*
ew Jackson, a negro, for stealing ten dollars from John Perrin: James McFee, a member of the Eleventh United States Infantry, for representing himself to be a policeman and being concerned in the robbery of John Perrin; Armistead Robinson, a negro, for stealing merchandise from Mitteldorfer & Sons; Charles Wilson, of the Eleventh United States Infantry, for being drunk and disorderly in the house of Belle Somers; Sarah Stevens, for disorderly conduct in the street and threatening to shoot Sarah Smith; Lewis Ranson, a negro, for stealing shoes from Morris & Hess; Charles Copeland, a negro, for carrying fire-arms; Isaac Brown, a negro, for discharging a gun in the market; George Williams, a negro, for carrying concealed weapons; H. R. Allen, citizen, for assaulting and beating two Federal soldiers; Sylvester Overton, a negro, for insulting a policeman while in the discharge of his duty; Henderson Taylor, a negro, for stealing a hat from Joseph Hirshberg, and Robert Harrison, a negro; fo