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Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 230 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 200 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 162 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 114 6 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 101 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 87 9 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 84 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 70 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 58 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 55 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for W. F. Smith or search for W. F. Smith in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 2.21 (search)
e. Suddenly he made a terrific leap in air, and from the spot of ground on which he had been sitting a solid shot scooped a wheelbarrow-load of dirt. It was a clear case of premonition, for the man could give no reason for having jumped. General Smith also speaks of the veterans' ridicule of the bounty men. The 24th Michigan became part of our brigade shortly after Antietam, and we were told they were mostly bounty men. [See below.] We made unmerciful sport of them, but never a joke or worordered. It was this agreement that enabled Lieutenant Rogers to save a long picket-line that was to have been sacrificed when we fell back. Racine, Wis., October 3d, 1886. Ii. By Orson B. Curtis, Corporal, Co. D, 24th Michigan. Since Private Smith, above, mentions the 24th Michigan as bounty men, let me state that in July, 1862, a war meeting held in Detroit to promote enlistments under Lincoln's call for 300,000 men was broken up by the disturbance created by a large number of Confede
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The first day at Gettysburg. (search)
ast corner of the McPherson woods, where General Reynolds was killed. From a photograph. had left the day before. Pushing on to Carlisle, he found that Ewell was gone, and the place occupied by a militia force under General W. F. Smith. General Smith commanded the First Division, Department of the Susquehanna, and was charged with the protection of Harrisburg.--editors. His demand of a surrender was refused; he threw a few shells into the town and burned the Government barracks. That nigerwhelming force on the flank and rear of the Eleventh Corps. On the east of Rock Creek, Jones's artillery battalion, within easy range, enfiladed its whole line and took it in reverse, while the brigades of Gordon, Hays, and Avery in line, with Smith's in reserve, advanced about 4 P. M. upon Barlow's position, Doles, of Rodes's division, connecting with Gordon. An obstinate and bloody contest ensued, in which Barlow was desperately wounded, Wilkeson killed, and the whole corps forced back to
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 9.97 (search)
engineer of the Army of the Cumberland. I had known Smith as a cadet at West Point, but had no recollection ofout to make a personal inspection, taking Thomas and Smith with me, besides most of the members of my personal men were at the same time detailed to act under General Smith directly from Chattanooga. Eighteen hundred of nd capture or drive away the pickets at that point. Smith was to march with the remainder of the detail, also ns and eighteen hundred brave and well-equipped men. Smith started enough in advance to be near the river when view from the top of Lookout. It was over this road Smith marched. At 5 o'clock Hazen landed at Brown's Ferryd and captured most of it. By 7 o'clock the whole of Smith's force was ferried over and in possession of a heigitors. In securing possession of Lookout Valley, Smith lost one man killed and four or five wounded. The enerman's arrival I took him, with Generals Thomas and Smith and other officers, to the north side of the river a
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Comments on General Grant's <placeName reg="Chattanooga, Hamilton, Tennessee" key="tgn,7017496" authname="tgn,7017496">Chattanooga</placeName>. (search)
eek which I reported on the 5th as proposed by Smith. Thomas, who rather preferred an attempt on L of Missionary Ridge made yesterday by Thomas, Smith, and Brannan from the heights opposite on the north of the Tennessee proved Smith's plan for attack impracticable. The creek and country are wroing submitted to him by General Thomas and General Smith. The necessary orders for the execution oafterward matured and carried out. When General Smith was assigned to duty the plan for the fortnder way. Under General Rosecrans's orders General Smith gave his attention to the details of both med command of the Army of the Cumberland, General Smith was retained as chief engineer, and Thomas the chief engineer as to the details. As General Smith says, Thomas would have made the same move, had General Grant been in Louisville. General Smith says that General Thomas is entitled to th detracting from the honor that belongs to General Smith, who executed the plan, to General Thomas,[3 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The army of the Cumberland at Chattanooga. (search)
s, was prepared at Chattanooga as rapidly as possible, at an improvised saw-mill. But the plan finally adopted was conceived and worked out by General William F., Smith, Chief Engineer of the Army of the Cumberland. On the 20th of October, after having been fully matured, it was submitted, and was warmly approved by Thomas, who had then succeeded Rosecrans, and who at once gave orders to General Smith, General Hooker, and others to carry it into execution with all possible expedition. General Grant reached Chattanooga the evening of the 23d. General Smith's plan was explained to him, and he heartily approved it and directed its execution. Everything necGeneral Smith's plan was explained to him, and he heartily approved it and directed its execution. Everything necessary for the movement being in readiness, it was commenced with the greatest possible haste and secrecy on the night of the 26th. After midnight, fourteen hundred picked men from Hazen's and Turchin's brigades, under command of Brigadier-General Hazen, quietly marched to the river-bank at Chattanooga; the rest of the troops of t