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Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 230 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 200 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 162 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 114 6 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 101 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 87 9 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 84 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 70 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 58 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 55 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler. You can also browse the collection for W. F. Smith or search for W. F. Smith in all documents.

Your search returned 115 results in 5 document sections:

Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 14: in command of the Army of the James. (search)
tly into Richmond. I called on my generals, Smith and Gillmore, and explained this plan. I saidroops which I had ordered should report to General Smith, were still under his own command; and beceutenant-General Grant. Another letter of General Smith See Appendix No. 44. shows the state of, how they could thwart and interfere with me. Smith's letter shows that Gillmore would do nothing in the world to aid Smith. I did not then think Smith was quite in that frame of mind towards GillSmith was quite in that frame of mind towards Gillmore, but other evidence has shown me that he was. Indeed, as will appear, it was impossible even tder one division of his corps to report to General Smith with two days rations ready to march at an point that may be attacked. Of course, General Smith's demonstration will cover the right of General Gillmore's line of works, unless he [General Smith] is forced back. General Kautz has orderswas sent to endeavor to turn their right while Smith attacked the front. Both movements were galla[17 more...]
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 15: operations of the Army of the James around Richmond and Petersburg. (search)
ld be ours. After consultation I directed General Smith to make his attack upon the upper batterieforward toward the river. Shortly after General Smith's aid had gone I became anxious lest Smith his own men. Upon Davenport's report that Smith refused to obey my orders to renew the attack jor-General. But my staff officer had seen Smith and Hancock talking together. Smith got Hancostablished by incontestable evidence that when Smith made his attack upon Petersburg with more than the Second Corps marching in the direction of Smith's forces, am I not justified in using the hardmation that a part of Hancock's corps was with Smith, with a message to the latter to renew the attack and push on, and that was received by Smith between ten and eleven o'clock at night, and he rete of which there is any official evidence, and Smith went to Washington without the leave of his comation of Emancipation, and had consulted with Smith on the question of its publication, thus betra[62 more...]
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 16: capture of fortifications around Richmond, Newmarket Heights, Dutch Gap Canal, elections in New York and gold conspiracy. (search)
ld him that I had another thing in view. The affair of the mine at Petersburg, which had been discussed between us, had convinced me that in the Army of the Potomac negro troops were thought of no value, and with the exception of an attack under Smith on the 15th of June, where they were prevented from entering Petersburg by the sloth, inaction, or I believe worse, of Smith, the negro troops had had no chance to show their valor or staying qualities in action. I told him that I meant to take Smith, the negro troops had had no chance to show their valor or staying qualities in action. I told him that I meant to take a large part of my negro force, and under my personal command make an attack upon Newmarket Heights, the redoubt to the extreme left of the enemy's line. If I could take that and turn it, then I was certain that I could gain the first line of the enemy's intrenchments around Richmond. I said: I want to convince myself whether, when under my own eye, the negro troops will fight; and if I can take with the negroes, a redoubt that turned Hancock's corps on a former occasion, that will settle the
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 18: why I was relieved from command. (search)
his major-generals, who generally failed to be on time when an order was given and some of whom were boys at West Point when I was a major-general in command of armies, I never attempted to make any movement during his absence. This I omitted to do because I knew that they would no more obey my command implicitly and promptly than they did Meade's during those last disastrous days, the 16th, 17th, and 18th of June, when Meade was attempting to retake Petersburg, which the colored troops of Smith's corps had once taken, and which he had let go. It appears by Meade's circular of orders to make the attack on those days, that he did not instruct each corps to attack in exact time and conjunction with the others, so that his superiority of numbers, fifty thousand to ten thousand, would tell in his favor, obliging the smaller number of the enemy to keep their whole line of intrenchments fully manned all the time. On the contrary, he said in substance: As I find it impossible to have t
l be commanded by Maj.-Gen. W. F. Smith. With Smith and Gillmore, Butler will seize City Point andion you have shown me. I have possessed General Smith with my views as well upon the subject of nducted to-day with energy and success. Generals Smith and Gillmore are pushing the landing of thdquarters Bermuda landing, May 7, 1864. Major-General Smith, Commanding Eighteenth Army Corps: Ge page 643.] headquarters, May 7, 1864. Major-General Smith, Commanding Eighteenth Army Corps: Ieach division of your command to report to General Smith at eight o'clock this morning, for the purrdered. I directed him to co-operate with General Smith when he went to make demonstrations on thel the force may be drawn to the advance of General Smith. When you hear his guns and have word froon bridge, that can be thrown across below General Smith's headquarters, and cut all the roads whict desire this change made, but simply want General Smith assigned to the command of the Eighteenth [3 more...]