Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Walter W. Smith or search for Walter W. Smith in all documents.

Your search returned 15 results in 4 document sections:

had been chosen by lot to meet the same fate as Walter W. Smith, prize-master of the schooner Enchantress, withreceive exactly the same treatment as prize-master Walter W. Smith. He also ordered that thirteen other prisot fell to Colonel Corcoran to become the hostage for Smith. Since only ten other Federal field-officers were h untenable. Judge Grier, one of the bench who tried Smith in Philadelphia, aptly remarked that he could not unthe crew was taken to Philadelphia. There, Walter W Smith, prize-master, was tried for piracy in the United Sty the enemy for the execution of the prisoner of war Smith, recently condemned to death in Philadelphia. You-ninth New York was chosen by lot as the hostage for Smith. As only eleven Federal field-officers were held as untenable. Judge Grier, one of the bench who tried Smith in Philadelphia, aptly said that he could not undersolonel Michael Corcoran was held as hostage for Walter W. Smith, prize-master of the schooner Enchantress, who
therland, Baxter, Sternberg, and Forwood, all of them surgeons-general during or after the war. Others were Letterman, Smart, Woodward, Huntington, Otis, Woodhull, Smith, Greenleaf, and others whose great services might be mentioned. Many of these men became figures of national importance in a medical and surgical sense. Some in In the upper photograph are soldiers convalescing at Baton Rouge, Louisiana, from their wounds received on the Red River and Port Hudson expeditions, and below is Smith's farm near Keedysville, Maryland, close to where the battle of Antietam was fought in September, 1862. In the course of the day's fierce firing nearly twenty-fiver side. Dr. Bernard, surgeon of the One Hundred and Second New York, was made the chief of all the hospitals. One of the locations of his corps hospitals was on Smith's farm. In the background of the picture is a fine view of South Mountain. In the foreground the men are gathered about a fire. Soldiers convalescing at Bat
enant-colonel J. J. Woodward Brevet major Charles R. Greenleaf Brevet lieutenant-colonel J. S. Billings probably have made them national figures in the military history of the United States. Some of the names on this medical roll of honor from the regular army are those of Finley, Hammond, Barnes, Crane, Murray, Moore, Sutherland, Baxter, Sternberg, and Forwood, all of them surgeons-general during or after the war. Others were Letterman, Smart, Woodward, Huntington, Otis, Woodhull, Smith, Greenleaf, and others whose great services might be mentioned. Many of these men became figures of national importance in a medical and surgical sense. Some in their time were recognized as the highest authorities the world over in respect to the professional subjects with which they had been particularly identified. Contrary to the usual idea of the general public, army medical officers have many important duties outside the actual professional treatment of sick and wounded. Far-reac
t the bone had Caring for the wounded from the Mississippi to the Potomac In the upper photograph are soldiers convalescing at Baton Rouge, Louisiana, from their wounds received on the Red River and Port Hudson expeditions, and below is Smith's farm near Keedysville, Maryland, close to where the battle of Antietam was fought in September, 1862. In the course of the day's fierce firing nearly twenty-five thousand men were killed and wounded. It covered a period of about twelve hours; few entrenchments or fortifications of any kind were used by either side. Dr. Bernard, surgeon of the One Hundred and Second New York, was made the chief of all the hospitals. One of the locations of his corps hospitals was on Smith's farm. In the background of the picture is a fine view of South Mountain. In the foreground the men are gathered about a fire. Soldiers convalescing at Baton Rouge, Louisiana, from their wounds received on the Red River and Port Hudson expeditions After