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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 5 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 14, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 16, 1864., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 3 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Caleb B. Smith or search for Caleb B. Smith in all documents.

Your search returned 19 results in 9 document sections:

e was transferred to a more responsible position, I was glad that his services had been thus secured for the benefit of his country. His associate, Major Ballou, of the same regiment, is deserving of the highest commendation as a brave soldier and a true man. Captain Tower, of the Second regiment, Rhode Island Volunteers, received his death wound at the very commencement of the battle. He was a young, brave, and promising officer, who is deeply lamented by his comrades and friends. Captain Smith, of the Second Rhode Island Volunteers, was known among us for his many good qualities of head and heart. Lieutenant Prescott, of the First Rhode Island regiment, was also killed in the early part of the action, while gallantly encouraging his company. He was a noble-hearted Christian man, whose memory will be ever fresh in the hearts of his friends. Among those who are missing I have to mention the names of Lieutenant Knight, of the First regiment Rhode Island Volunteers, and Dr. Jam
regiment, being the smallest--four companies not having come up from Piedmont — was designated for the service. Brigadier-General Smith accompanied the brigade to the battle-field, and continued to exercise the command over it with which he had beed at Piedmont. The march to the field, part of the way, was performed in double-quick. The battle raged fiercely, and Gen. Smith ordered the brigade to pass Lewis House and proceed to the scene of action. On entering the field to the left, Gen. Gen. Smith was shot from his horse, and the entire command reverted to myself. The brigade was formed in line of battle, with the 10th Virginia regiment in reserve. About this time Captains Hill and Cunningham, of Gen. Smith's staff, reported to me. I dGen. Smith's staff, reported to me. I detached Capt. Cunningham with four companies of the 10th Virginia regiment to hold a captured battery, and directed Capt. Hill to conduct Beckham's battery to a point on the left. The position was well selected, and the battery under Lieut. Beckham
nt, Simon Cameron, Secretary of War. Hon. Francis H. Pierpont, Governor, Commonwealth of Virginia, Wheeling, Va. Department of the Interior, Washington. To His Excellency, Francis H. Pierpont, Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia: I, Caleb B. Smith, Secretary of the Interior, do hereby certify that, in discharge of the duty devolved on me by the provisions of an act of Congress, approved May 23d, 1850, entitled An act providing for the taking of the seventh and subsequent census of the by the 25th Section thereof. And I do further certify that the Commonwealth of Virginia is entitled to eleven (11) members in the House of Representatives for the 38th Congress, and until another apportionment shall be made according to law. [L. S.] In testimony whereof, I have hereunto subscribed my name, and caused the seal of the Department of the Interior to be affixed, this twenty-sixth day of June in tile year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one. Caleb B. Smith.
g is a list of the officers: Colonel — Henry Whiting, St. Clair, Mich.; Lieut.-Colonel--Geo. J. Stannard, St. Albans, Vt.; Major — Chas. H. Joyce, Northfield; Adjutant — Guilford S. Ladd, Bennington; Quartermaster — Perley P. Pitkin, Montpelier; Surgeon — Newton H. Ballou, Burlington; Assistant-Surgeon--Walter B. Carpenter, Burlington; Sergeant-Major--Wm. H. Guinan, Montpelier; Quartermaster's Sergeant — Wm. J. Cain, Rutland; Commissary-Sergeant — Lauriston H. Stone, Stowe; Chaplain--Rev. C. B. Smith, Brandon; Hospital Steward — Eli Z. Stearns, Burlington; Drum-Major--Chas. Remick, Hardwick. Company A, Bennington.--Jos. H. Walbridge, Captain; Newton Stone, First Lieutenant; William H. Cady, Second Lieutenant. Company B, Castleton.--James Hope, Captain; John Howe, First Lieutenant; Enoch E. Johnson, Second Lieutenant. Company C, Brattleboro.--Ed. A. Todd, Captain; J. S. Tyler, First Lieutenant; F. A. Prouty, Second Lieutenant. Company D, Waterbury.--Chas. Dillingham, Capt
ll, share and share alike ? No law, then, has been passed applying the Wilmot Proviso. Has any been enacted abolishing slavery in the District of Columbia? No. Even Mr. Lincoln assures us that he will approve no such law, except with the consent of the slaveholders of the District, and then not without compensation to the owners. Has any law been passed interfering with slavery in the States? Not at all. Such a doctrine is not even in the Chicago platform. Mr. Lincoln, Mr. Seward, Mr. Caleb B. Smith, Attorney-General Bates, Senator Wilson, and all the chief men of the Republican party repudiate it — none maintain it but professed and extreme Abolitionists, such as Gerritt Smith, Henry Ward Beecher, Wm. Lloyd Garrison, Arthur Tappan, Charles Sumner, and Wendell Phillips, whose fanatical and wicked efforts, backed by all the aid they can enlist from the rank and file of pure Abolitionism, can never any more disturb or harm the institution of slavery in the States than the zephyr's b
Doc. 76 1/2.-battle at Monroe Station, Mo., July 10, 1861. The following particulars of the affair at Monroe, being gathered from parties that were present, may be considered substantially correct. On Monday, Colonel Smith, hearing that the State troops, under General Harris, were encamped near Florida, left Monroe Station with a force of 500 men, to disperse them. After passing Florida, and when a short distance north of one of the fords of Salt River, on the other side of which the Stout 200 of the State forces, and burned the depot and some cars. The officers on the Hannibal and St. Joseph road report thirteen passenger and seventeen freight cars destroyed, and another station-house burned a short distance from Monroe. Col. Smith, as soon as he reached the latter place, threw his entire force into a large building used as an academy. Harris's command, some 2,500 in number, surrounded him and brought two six-pound cannon to bear on the building. Owing to the distance a
e on board guns, gun carriages, and munitions to reinforce Ship Island, Major-General Twiggs, and Captain Higgins, and Major Smith using every possible effort to get every thing in readiness. The steamer Gray Cloud was also taken into requisition, t. The Gray Cloud coming up slowly, the Oregon took off her ammunition, and proceeded at once to the scene of action, Major Smith directing the Gray Cloud to follow at a safe distance. Having arrived at the island, Captain Myers proceeded at once in his yawl, with Major Smith, with a load of shell and powder, being received with cheers by Captain Thom, of the C. S. marines, and the sailors and soldiers, who at once carried the supplies to the batteries. The enemy had fired some thirty oddaim arrived with Lieutenant-Colonel H. W. Allen, of the Fourth Regiment, from Mississippi City, with three companies. Major Smith is now in command, fortifying the island, and a larger force may shortly be expected. So much for our first naval bru
: By command of my superior officer I have occupied your county-seat. By like command I require you to deliver, every morning before nine o'clock A. M., to Colonel Smith, commanding Sixteenth Illinois regiment, the following rations for his command: Salt pork or bacon, 412 pounds, or in lieu thereof, 687 pounds fresh beef; cllons; wood, 1/2 cord; corn in ear, 2 bushels; water sufficient for command to be hauled. If these articles are promptly furnished receipts will be given by Colonel Smith; if not furnished, they will be taken from the most convenient persons and places, and the regiment will be billeted upon the city of Palmyra, in private houset, the authorities of the city of Palmyra will be required to fill this order and render their charges against the county. All persons who know of parties engaged in the above criminal acts are required to give sworn information to us or Colonel Smith, commanding Sixteenth regiment. S. A. Hurlburt, Brigadier-General U. S. Army.
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 206.-U. S. Executive Government, 1861-65. (search)
Doc. 206.-U. S. Executive Government, 1861-65. Abraham Lincoln, of Ill., President. Hannibal Hamlin, of Me., Vice-President. Secretary of State.--William H. Seward, of N. Y. Secretary of Treasury.--Salmon P. Chase, of Ohio. Secretary of Interior.--Caleb B. Smith, of Indiana. Secretary of Navy.--Gideon Welles, of Conn. Secretary of War.--Simon Cameron, of Penn. Attorney-General.--Edward Bates, of Mo. P. M. General.--Montgomery Blair, of Mo.