Browsing named entities in Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army .. You can also browse the collection for Charles H. Smith or search for Charles H. Smith in all documents.

Your search returned 13 results in 4 document sections:

commanding the Cavalry Corps. He was the only division commander I had whose experience had been almost exclusively derived from the cavalry arm. Second division. Brigadier-General David McM. Gregg. first brigade. Brigadier-General Henry E. Davies, Jr. First Massachusetts, Major Lucius M. Sargent. First New Jersey, Lieutenant-Colonel John W. Kester. Sixth Ohio, Colonel William Stedman. First Pennsylvania, Colonel John P. Taylor. Second brigade. Colonel J. Irvin Gregg. First Maine, Colonel Charles H. Smith. Tenth New York, Major M. Henry Avery. Second Pennsylvania, Lieutenant-Colonel Joseph P. Brinton. Fourth Pennsylvania, Lieutenant-Colonel George H. Covode. Eighth Pennsylvania, Lieutenant-Colonel Samuel Wilson. Sixteenth Pennsylvania, Lieutenant-Colonel John K. Robinson. Third division. Brigadier-General James H. Wilson. Wilson graduated in 1860 in the Topographical Engineers, and was first assigned to duty in Oregon, where he remained till July, 1861. In the fall of that yea
nsylvania, Lieutenant-Colonel John K. Robison. Twenty-first Pennsylvania, Colonel Oliver B. Knowles. First U. S. Artillery, Batteries H and I, Lieut. Chandler P. Eakin.[Detached with Artillery Brigade, Ninth Army Corps.] Third brigade: Colonel Charles H. Smith. First Maine, Lieutenant-Colonel Jonathan P. Cilley. Second New York Mounted Rifles, Major Paul Chadbourne. Sixth Ohio, Major John H. Cryer. Thirteenth Ohio, Lieutenant-Colonel Stephen R. Clark. Our general direction was westward,evin out as far as the White Oak road to make a reconnoissance to Five Forks, Crook being instructed to send Davies's brigade to support Devin. Crook was to hold, with Gregg's brigade, the Stony Creek crossing of the Boydton plankroad, retaining Smith's near Dinwiddie, for use in any direction required. On the 29th W. H. F. Lee conformed the march of his cavalry with that of ours, but my holding Stony Creek in this way forced him to make a detour west of Chamberlin's Run, in order to get in c
front of Dinwiddie, near J. Boisseau's. Crook, with Smith and Gregg's brigades, continued to cover Stony Creek At the same hour that Merritt started, Crook moved Smith's brigade out northwest from Dinwiddie to Fitzgeralderlain's Creek, to cover Merritt's left, supporting Smith by placing Gregg to his right and rear. The occupatberlain's Creek. To hold on to Fitzgerald's ford Smith had to make a sharp fight, but Mumford's cavalry attt all hazards. At the same time orders were sent to Smith's brigade, which, by the advance of Pickett past itst Capehart into place just in time to lend a hand to Smith, who, severely pressed, came back on us here from hinacular for a woody swamp such as that through which Smith retired. A little later the brigades of Gregg and G cause it to recoil in astonishment, which permitted Smith to connect his brigade with Custer unmolested. We wbut later was brought along the Five Forks road to Dr. Smith's, and Crook's division was directed to continue w
reconnoissance to Paine's crossroads. Davies soon found out that Lee was trying to escape by that flank, for at the crossroads he found the Confederate trains and artillery moving rapidly westward. Having driven away the escort, Davies succeeded in burning nearly two hundred wagons, and brought off five pieces of artillery. Among these wagons were some belonging to General Lee's and to General Fitzhugh Lee's headquarters. This work through, Davies withdrew and rejoined Crook, who, with Smith and Gregg, was established near Flat Creek. It being plain that Lee would attempt to escape as soon as his trains were out of the way, I was most anxious to attack him when the Second Corps began to arrive, for I felt certain that unless we did so he would succeed in passing by our left flank, and would thus again make our pursuit a stern-chase; but General Meade, whose plan of attack was to advance his right flank on Amelia Court House, objected to assailing before all his troops were u