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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 189 43 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 75 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 60 18 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 54 18 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 35 17 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 35 19 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 33 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 32 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 2 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 8 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War. You can also browse the collection for E. Kirby Smith or search for E. Kirby Smith in all documents.

Your search returned 26 results in 10 document sections:

General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 1 (search)
f rapid conversion from flint to percussion lock by Governor Letcher's orders; and twenty thousand lately procured for the State of Georgia, by Governor Brown. I reached Harper's Ferry soon after noon of the 23d of May, accompanied by Colonel E. Kirby Smith, Afterward lieutenant-general. acting adjutant-general, Major W. H. C. Whiting, Who fell at Fort Fisher, a major-general. of the Engineer Corps, Major E. McLean, of the Quartermaster's Department, and Captain T. L. Preston, assistant adonel A. C. Cummings, had been added to Jackson's brigade; the Sixth North Carolina to Bee's; the Eleventh Georgia to Bartow's; The Ninth Georgia had joined it soon after the troops reached Winchester. and a fifth brigade formed, for Brigadier-General E. Kirby Smith, just promoted, of the Nineteenth Mississippi, Eighth, Ninth, Tenth, and Eleventh Alabama regiments, and Stannard's Battery. Measles, mumps, and other diseases, to which new troops are subject, had been so prevalent, that the averag
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 2 (search)
Enough of the cars, sent down in the morning to convey about two regiments, were brought back before midnight, but the conductors and engineers disappeared immediately, to pass the night probably in sleep, instead of on the road. And it was not until seven or eight o'clock Saturday morning that the trains could be put in motion, carrying the Fourth Alabama and Second Mississippi regiments, with two companies of the Eleventh. General Bee and myself accompanied these troops. Brigadier-General E. Kirby Smith was left at Piedmont to expedite the transportation of the remaining brigades-about three-fifths of the army. We reached General Beauregard's position about noon. The Seventh and Eighth Georgia regiments were united to the detachment just arrived, to form a temporary brigade for General Bee. As the army had not been informed, in the usual way, of the promotion of Generals Cooper, Lee, and myself, to the grade of general, I had, after leaving Winchester, requested the Pr
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter3 (search)
jor-General Jackson; the District of the Potomac, commanded by General Beauregard, and extending from the Blue Ridge to the Quantico; and that of the Acquia, lying between the Quantico and the Chesapeake, commanded by Major-General Holmes. The Stonewall brigade was transferred with General Jackson to the Valley district. Brigadier-General R. B. Garnett, who joined the army soon after, was sent to Winchester, where General Jackson's headquarters were established, to command it. Major-General E. Kirby Smith, who had recovered from his wound, and rejoined the army just then, succeeded General Jackson in the command of the reserve. The Texan Brigade, ever after so distinguished in the Army of Northern Virginia, had then been completed by Brigadier-General Wigfall. A trifling circumstance that occurred at this time was the foundation of a grave accusation, said to have been frequently made against me orally, by Mr. Benjamin, then acting Secretary of War. Major-General Van Do
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 4 (search)
ment attempted to lessen the sufferings of prisoners of war by shortening their terms of confinement, and how little of that spirit was exhibited by the Federal Administration. When the Department of East Tennessee was constituted, Major-General E. Kirby Smith was selected to command it. Many's, Bate's, and Vaughn's Tennessee regiments were transferred with him to that department. Major-General R. S. Ewell, just promoted, succeeded to the command of General E. K. Smith's division. SoonGeneral E. K. Smith's division. Soon after the middle of this month, I was summoned to Richmond by the President, who wished to confer with me on a subject in which secrecy was so important that he could not venture, he said, to commit it to paper, and the mail. I arrived in Richmond on the 20th, early enough to reach the President's office two hours before noon. The cabinet was in session, and I was summoned into the room. The President explained that he had sent for me to discuss the question of withdrawing the army to a less
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 6 (search)
which he directed that officer to cross the Mississippi with his forces, and unite them with those of Lieutenant-General Pemberton. He then read me a note from the President, directing him to countermand his instructions to Lieutenant-General Holmes. A day or two after this, General Randolph retired from the War Department, to the great injury of the Confederacy. On the 24th, I received orders of that date, assigning me to the command of the departments of General Bragg, Lieutenant-General E. Kirby Smith, and Lieutenant-General Pemberton. I replied, on the same day: I had the honor, this afternoon, to receive special orders, No. 225, of this date. If I have been correctly informed, the forces which it places under my command are greatly inferior in number to those of the enemy opposed to them, while in the Trans-Mississippi Department our army is very much larger than that of the United States. Our two armies on this side of the Mississippi have the disadvantage of
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 7 (search)
ders, who brought the dispatch, told me that he was directed to say, from Lieutenant-General Pemberton, that I ought to attempt nothing with less than forty thousand men. This dispatch was answered on the 22d: General Taylor is sent by General E. K. Smith to cooperate with you from the west bank of the river, to throw in supplies, and to cross with his forces if expedient and practicable. I will have the means of moving toward the enemy in a day or two, and will try to make a diversion in without relief, and the enemy is within conversation distance. We are living on very reduced rations.... In replying, on the 27th, to Lieutenant-General Pemberton's last dispatch, I said that the determination manifested by him, and General E. K. Smith's expected cooperation, encouraged me to hope that something might yet be done to save Vicksburg; but that if it should become necessary to make propositions to General Grant, they must be made by him, as my making them would be an impolit
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 7 (search)
in the above letter were numbered by me, for precision of reference. This letter seems to have been written to prove that I committed a grave military offense, by regarding the order of May 19th as assigning me to a new position, and limiting my command to the Department of Mississippi. Much of it is to prove what those concerned could not doubt, and never denied: that, on the 24th of November, 1862, I was assigned to the command of the armies under General Bragg, and Lieutenant-Generals E. Kirby Smith and Pemberton, in Tennessee and Mississippi. The object of much more of it is to show, to as little purpose, that the order of May 9th annulled no part of that of November 24, 1862. The President's interpretation of his own orders was conclusive. That in question was interpreted in a telegram dated June 8th, five or six weeks before this letter left his office. This explanation made all arguments and instances useless, and left no occasion for a very long and harsh lette
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 11 (search)
attacked and drove it back. Just then the army was visited by General Bragg. That officer was directly from Richmond, on his way, he said, to Lieutenant-General S. D. Lee's headquarters, to confer with him and communicate with Lieutenant-General E. Kirby Smith--to ascertain what reenforcements for me their departments could furnish. His visit to me was unofficial, he assured me. At the same time Governor Brown promised to bring ten thousand more State militia into the army; he was co he would be glad to see those officers as friends, but only in that way, as his visit was unofficial. He added that the object of his journey was to confer with Lieutenant-General Lee, and from his headquarters to communicate with Lieutenant-General E. Kirby Smith, to ascertain what reenforcements for me could be furnished by their departments. He talked much more of military affairs in Virginia than of those in Georgia, asserting, what I believed, that Sherman's army exceeded Grant's in fig
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 14 (search)
e routes from Pennsylvania and Maryland at Winchester. That was therefore, in my opinion, our best position. General E. Kirby Smith wrote to me as follows, May 28, 1867: From the date of assuming command at Harper's Ferry to your evacuation 6th, expressed opinions decidedly unfavorable to Harper's Ferry as a military position, and proposed its evacuation. General Smith's testimony is direct and positive to the same effect; and the extract above, from my official report of the events ias, the intended that the Army I commanded should be employed in the defense of the Valley. In the letter quoted, General E. K. Smith wrote: As second in command and your adjutant-general, possessing your confidence, my position was one that made iregard was given to me; no dispatch on the subject came to me but that given on page 33, which is not imperative. General E. K. Smith testifies that I received no other; and that that one was acted upon promptly. I am accused of arriving at Man
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Letters. (search)
olumns, one by the New Kent road, under Major-General Smith; the other by that of the Chickahominy,'s march was too late to permit that of Major-General Smith's the same afternoon. His division movr in Mississippi except by the river, could E. K. Smith's men return a The impossibility of my knowe. Can any large part of it be furnished? E. K. Smith's troops here might be spared for a few wee of War. Canton, May 31, 1863. Lieutenant-General E. Kirby Smith, Commanding Trans-Mississippi Deieutenant-Colonel Montgomery, of Lieutenant-General E. Kirby Smith's staff, being then present and portant approaches to the city by Forney's and Smith's divisions, while the troops which had been e; Brigadier-General Shoupe's brigade of Major-General Smith's division guarded the river-front of the graveyard road, about two miles; and Major-General Smith, with three brigades, the Mississippi S inasmuch as I had learned from prisoners that Smith's division was at Dillon's, and the rest of th