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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 189 43 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 75 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 60 18 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 54 18 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 35 17 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 35 19 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 33 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 32 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 2 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 8 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for E. Kirby Smith or search for E. Kirby Smith in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 1 document section:

the enemy in front were in more than usual force. We learned from prisoners that Lieutenant-General E. Kirby Smith, of the rebel army, was in command, that his trains had fallen back on the road to the front. The headquarter trains were removed back to Pleasant Hill, and the divisions of General Smith were formed in line of battle, in which position they remained the whole night. The divisioof smoke that curled around him, than in the noise and bustle that filled the air. There was General Smith, with his bushy, grayish beard, and his eager eye, as it looks through spectacles, giving hied a victory. The time had come. The enemy was before us. Emory's division rallied; and one of Smith's divisions, which had been lying on the ground, arose, and sent volley after volley into the enharge and rally, to charge and rally again. In every point our men gained the day. The lines of Smith's division stood like the stone walls that Virginian patois has contributed to our military lang