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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 189 43 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 75 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 60 18 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 54 18 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 35 17 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 35 19 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 33 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 32 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 2 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 8 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for E. Kirby Smith or search for E. Kirby Smith in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of the Third Battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
outposts of the enemy and seizing a range of hills on their front. This position was maintained till the 23d, when General Reynolds received orders from General E. Kirby Smith to march by way of Roger's Gap and Cumberland Ford and join him in Kentucky. Richmond, Ky., was reached two days after the Confederate victory at that illery and baggage wagons, and the capture of their whole infantry force. In the subsequent march through Kentucky to the Ohio river, Reynold's brigade overtook Smith's advance, and the Third Maryland was the first to enter Lexington. They were greeted on all sides with ex-clamations of joy and welcome. Great quantities of clored back to Georgetown on the 11th of September, and on the 3d of October, at Big Eagle Creek, near Frankfort, there was a review of Reynolds's brigade by General E. Kirby Smith. When, on the 4th, Governor Hawes was inaugurated Military Governor of Kentucky, at Frankfort, the Third Maryland Artillery was selected to fire the hono
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Third Battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
loskey much of a gentleman. How do you get on with sassafras tea and bull now? I suspect you will scarcely make a shadow when I see you. Our bill of fare consists of bacon, fat beef, venison steak, eggs, biscuit, and strong green tea. I hope we will get some coffee soon. Tell Major Clark if he wants a horse, he can have Alex. until I come back. Should any letters have come for me, please forward them and write me at this place, to which we will return from Burwick's bay. General E. Kirby Smith arrived here the other day. I saw him at church yesterday. Major Brown is not with him. Excuse a longer letter. This is such a bad pen. I am horrified at my own writing. It would disgrace John B. Rowan or Ferd. Claiborne. Remember me to Ritter, Claiborne, Franklin, Tinley, Halbrook, and all friends. Very truly yours, Wm. T. Patten. On the 19th of March another letter was received from Lieutenant Patten, which was the last he wrote Lieutenant Rowan. The combat at Jac