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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 189 43 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 75 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 60 18 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 54 18 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 35 17 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 35 19 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 33 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 32 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 2 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 10 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for E. Kirby Smith or search for E. Kirby Smith in all documents.

Your search returned 13 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), United Confederate Veterans. (search)
ier-General: 1. Department of the Atlantic, including the States of Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia and Florida. Medical Director, Hunter McGuire, M. D., Richmond, Va., formerly surgeon of the Corps of Stonewall Jackson. 2. Department of the Gulf, including the States of Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee and Kentucky. Medical Director, David W. Yandell, M. D., Louisville, Ky., formerly Surgeon-General of the Transmississippi Department under Gen. E. Kirby Smith. 3. Department of the Transmississippi, including the States of Arkansas, Texas, Indian Territory and Missouri. Medical Director, J. M. Kelly, M. D., Hot Springs, Ark., formerly medical director of Transmississippi Department and chief surgeon of the army of General T. C. Hindman. Department of Maryland—Medical Director, Julian J. Chisholm, M. D., Baltimore, Md., formerly medical purveyor and inspector Confederate States Army. Department of Virginia—Medical Director, John Her
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Third Battery of Maryland Artillery, C. S. A. Its history in brief, and its commanders. (search)
per, a correct version of the matter in a few words. The Third Maryland Battery was mustered into the Confederate States service January 14, 1862, at Richmond, Va., and was ordered to Knoxville, East Tennessee, February 4, 1862. Under General E. Kirby Smith it went into Kentucky, August, 1862. After the return of General Smith to Tennessee the battery was sent to Vicksburg, Miss., arriving there January 3, 1863. Shortly afterward one gun was sent to General Ferguson, on Deer Creek, Miss., General Smith to Tennessee the battery was sent to Vicksburg, Miss., arriving there January 3, 1863. Shortly afterward one gun was sent to General Ferguson, on Deer Creek, Miss., and two guns to Fort DeRussa on Red river, which were put aboard the Queen of the West, after the capture of that vessel. Three guns, with the main body of the battery, were in the siege of Vicksburg, and at the capitulation, July 4, 1863, were surrendered. The battery was reorganized at Decatur, Ga., in October, 1863, and ordered to Sweet Water, Tenn., afterwards to Lookout Mountain, near Chattanooga. Was in the battle of Missionary Ridge and in the retreat to Dalton, Ga., November, 1863
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.19 (search)
repeated assaults of the many Federal divisions upon Longstreet's Division alone, for thus since morning had been vainly employed Hooker and Kearney, Couch, Casey, Smith and others, until night found them all repulsed, with Hooker and Kearney so cut up and demoralized as to be of little further use for weeks. The battle was cons Virginia chased from his own headquarters and took his dinner, cooking on the fire, and his ice cream in the freezers under the shade of the trees near by (!) and Smith and others, large divisions, every one besides artillery and all of Stoneman's cavalry too. The skirmish of the morning by evening had developed into a real assaulments of infantry and ten guns—3,000 men in line, and a closed redoubt, he called loudly and frequently for reinforcements, which, to the extent of three brigades (Smith's two and Naglee's), General McClellan sent him immediately after his arrival from the rear. The latter considered this action the most important of the entire b
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.22 (search)
certainly attack Port Powhatan on the river James. They did not know how anxious we were to get away from that river. Zzzthe forces Pursuing Hampton. Now let's see who they sent after us. First, General Humphries, General Meade's chief of staff, sent General Davies with all his cavalry; then came a brigade of infantry and a battery of artillery to the Jerusalem road. Next came General Kautz, with his cavalry, to the Prince George Courthouse road. Next, General Humphries ordered Colonel Smith, of the Second Division, Second Corps, to send a strong brigade to the Prince George Courthouse road. Next, he directed General Hancock to send a strong brigade and a battery of artillery down the plank road, and last, he directed the cavalry force, which was picketing between the plank road and the Blackwater, to be withdrawn and to join in the pursuit. Zzzthe petty fight the Federals made. And all that any of them did was to make the little fight that General Davies reports at
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.24 (search)
7th Mississippi Regiments, April 30, ‘64, 27th Mississippi Regiment. Buford, Smith, Assistant Surgeon, appointed by Secretary War, April 24, ‘63, to rank from Apr Texas, March 12, ‘63, transferred from Department and ordered to report to E. Kirby Smith. Gardner, R. B., Surgeon, appointed by Secretary of War Oct. 14, ‘62, tointed by Secretary of War June 15, ‘62, to rank June 15, ‘62, to report to Gen. E. K. Smith, Nov. 30, 63, 23d Alabama, April 30, ‘64, 23d Alabama. Hall, Joel, Sury Secretary of War, July 2, ‘62, to rank from Jan. 17, ‘62, to report to General E. K. Smith. Passed Board April ‘62. Nov. 3, ‘63, 46th Alabama Regiment. Feb. 29, ‘l Hardee. Dec. 30, ‘63, relieved from present duty, and ordered to report to E. K. Smith. Richardson, D. T., Assistant Surgeon. Passed Board at Macon, Miss., Decn, appointed by Secretary of War to rank from July 15, ‘62, to report to General E. K. Smith. Passed Board at Vicksburg March, 1862. Nov. 30,