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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 19 5 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for F. C. Smith or search for F. C. Smith in all documents.

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s effectually done. Changes in the principal commands of the corps since the last campaign,. left the organization as follows: First division, Brigadier-General A. J. Jackson commanding. The brigades commanded respectively by Colonels Selfridge, Carman, and Robinson. Second division, Brigadier-General J. W. Geary commanding. Three brigades, commanded by Colonels Pardee, Jones, and Barnum. Third division, Brigadier-General W. T. Ward commanding. Three brigades, commanded by Colonels F. C. Smith, Dustin, and Ross. A list of regiments composing the brigades will be found in reports of subordinate commanders. The artillery was reduced to four batteries of four guns each; two of three-inch Rodmans, and two of twelve-pounder Napoleons, under charge of Major J. A. Reynolds, Chief of Artillery. The horses were increased to eight to a carriage. The Ninth Illinois infantry, (mounted,) Lieutenant-Colonel Hughes commanding, joined the command on the second day, and remained w
s effectually done. Changes in the principal commands of the corps since the last campaign,. left the organization as follows: First division, Brigadier-General A. J. Jackson commanding. The brigades commanded respectively by Colonels Selfridge, Carman, and Robinson. Second division, Brigadier-General J. W. Geary commanding. Three brigades, commanded by Colonels Pardee, Jones, and Barnum. Third division, Brigadier-General W. T. Ward commanding. Three brigades, commanded by Colonels F. C. Smith, Dustin, and Ross. A list of regiments composing the brigades will be found in reports of subordinate commanders. The artillery was reduced to four batteries of four guns each; two of three-inch Rodmans, and two of twelve-pounder Napoleons, under charge of Major J. A. Reynolds, Chief of Artillery. The horses were increased to eight to a carriage. The Ninth Illinois infantry, (mounted,) Lieutenant-Colonel Hughes commanding, joined the command on the second day, and remained w
t to an order from corps headquarters, I ordered Colonel Smith, commanding First brigade, to move his command ting Third Division, Twentieth Army Corps. Colonel F. C. Smith's Report. headquarters First brigade, Thuty required of them. Respectfully submitted. F. C. Smith, Colonel Commanding. Major H. H. Clay's Repothe left of the First brigade of this division, (Colonel Smith,) the left connecting with the right of the Firseave. I found the First brigade in command of Colonel Smith, of the One Hundred and Second Illinois; the Sece, was also sent to the same place, reporting to Colonel Smith. The picket-duty of the Second and Third brign volunteers was detached from the brigade to Colonel F. C. Smith, One Hundred and Second Illinois volunteers, tahoochee Railroad bridge, there reporting to Colonel F. C. Smith, commanding post. Here we remained as part obridge and that city, we marched to Atlanta with Colonel Smith, and were there ordered to join our own again, w
time engaged. Previous to these expeditions being sent, and while our supplies were cut off, the horses of the batteries suffered terribly, many actually dying from starvation, and others being so reduced as to render them utterly unserviceable. Almost an entire new supply of horses had to be obtained. A short time before leaving Atlanta, a still further reduction of the artillery was made. Battery K, Fifth U. S. artillery, Captain Bainbridge; battery I, First Michigan artillery, Captain Smith and Thirteenth New-York independent battery, Captain Bundy, were relieved from duty with the corps and sent to Chattanooga, leaving but four batteries, (2) two twelve pounders and (2) two three-inch Rodman, of four guns each. On the fifteenth day of November, the corps left Atlanta, the batteries being distributed through the column, marching in this manner until reaching the enemy's lines near Savanah. Meeting with but slight resistance on the march, the batteries did not fire a gun