Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Francis H. Smith or search for Francis H. Smith in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A secret-service episode [from the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, October 21, 1900.] (search)
s. The old Governor is still with us as president of our board. With kindest regards, I am truly your friend, Francis H. Smith, Superintendent. To Mr. Louis Zimmer, Tryon City, N. C. This remarkable historical document requires some explal council of war. Commodore Matthew F. Maury, Lieutenant-Governor Robert L. Montague, Hon. Thomas S. Haymond and General Francis H. Smith. (Captain R. B. Pegram was afterward added to the board, or council.) These patriotic citizens performed all fuspect of existing conditions in the United States is necessary to show what led to the state of affairs alluded to by General Smith in the letter that heads this article. It is the testimony of every one of the historians of the Civil war that boetcher, of Virginia, for secret service duty, and with letters of highest commendation from Governor Letcher and General Francis H. Smith (the latter superintendent of the Virginia Military Institute), he reported to General Robert E. Lee, who in tur
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.5 (search)
Henry C. Rice, David. Roberts, John, died from wound received at Gettysburg, July 3, 1863. Read, Thomas N. Spencer, Charles. Spencer, Thomas. Spencer, James B. Spragins, Norman B., wounded in Rockbridge county, Va., 1864. Smith, John M., 4th Sergeant. Sheperson, David, Third Lieutenant. Killed at Williamsport, Sheperson, Joel. Smith, John G., Captain from April, 1861, to November, 1861. Spencer, William S. Swicher, Daniel, Rockbridge county. Saunders,Smith, John G., Captain from April, 1861, to November, 1861. Spencer, William S. Swicher, Daniel, Rockbridge county. Saunders, Robert. Scott, Thomas A. Spencer, Henry. Scott, J. H., died at Monterey, Va., in service, in 1861. Thornton, W. D. Thompkins, C. C., from Kanawha county, W. Va. Thompson, James C. Watkins, Charles W. Watkins, Henry, killed at Bunker Hill, 1864. Watkins, Frank B. Williams, W. B. Wood, Robert W. Walker, William A. Wood, Jas. E. Walker, Alexander S., from Brownsburg, Rockbridge county, Va. Wilson, James H. Watkins, Henry N. Wills, William B.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of the Confederate flag. (search)
matters, and that the naval committee were the proper gentlemen to be consulted. The bill was accordingly referred to the Committee on Naval Affairs; and after various plans had been submitted, and the opinions of the leading officers of the navy obtained, said committee unanimously recommended its adoption. Among the distinguished Confederate officers who approved the design of Major Rogers and recommended his proposed alteration in the national symbol of The Confederate States were: General Joseph E. Johnston, General S. Cooper, Lieutenant-General Ewell, Lieutenant-General Longstreet, Major-General Fitzhugh Lee, Rosser and Lomax, of the Cavalry; Brigadier-General Pendleton, of the Artillery; Major-General Heth, Major-General Smith, Governor of Virginia; General F. H. Smith, of Lexington, Va.; Captain N. W. Baker, acting chief of Signal Bureau; Captain Wilborne, of the Signal Corps; Brigadier-General Wharton, Colonel J. S. Mosby, and many other distinguished officers of the army.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gen. P. G. T. Beauregard. (search)
ill and despatch, and his real purpose was not immediately divined by his adversary. The movement was commenced on the night of the 12th. By noon on the 15th General Smith, with his corps, was before Petersburg. At 1:15 P. M. on the 16th General Lee asked in a telegram of Beauregard: Have you heard of Grant's crossing the James portation by rail, and sent forward first Hagood's Brigade, then Colquitt's, while the remainder of his division continued the forced march along the pike. When Smith, with his corps, 22,000 strong, had arrived before Petersburg at noon that day, the three miles of entrenchments threatened, were held by Wise's Brigade, some detached infantry, the local militia and Dearing's Cavalry—in all about 2,200 effectives of all arms. After consuming the afternoon in reconnaissance and preparation, Smith, at 7 P. M., assailed with a cloud of skirmishers, and carried the lines in his front. Just after this success, Hancock's Corps arrived, doubling the Federal forc
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Crenshaw Battery, Pegram's Battalion, Confederate States Artillery. (search)
ntly. Another day's journey brought us to the foot of Cash Mountain, where we had several men captured. Owing to the long and continuous marching of the battalion, the stock of horse flesh had been considerably reduced, and in order that the currency of the Confederacy might have a more extended and healthful circulation—that the miniature portrait of our beloved President might have more admirers —a party was made up headed by Lieutenant John Hampden Chamberlayne of our battery, with Sergeants Smith, Newman and Mallory, besides several others of the battalion, and started out in the mountains to purchase horses. The party soon came upon the picketpost of the Jessie Scouts, of the Federal army, when Ham Chamberlayne picked out about half a dozen of the men who were armed with revolvers, put himself at the head of them and led a charge. The picket-guard fell back on the regiment, and the whole party were captured and sent to prison. We remained here two days, waiting presumably fo