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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The career of Wise's Brigade, 1861-5. (search)
eased our effective force to just 2,200 men of all arms. This force could not in a thin skirmish line reach from battery No. 1 below the city to the plank road. The 46th and 26th were posted on the left from battery No. 1 to battery No. 6; tho 34th from battery No. 14 in the centre, and the Georgia battalion and the militia and irregular forces on the extreme right. Whilst in this position, the enemy numbering 22,200, including Hincks' corps of colored troops, commanded by (Wm. F.) Baldy Smith, advanced from City Point and Cobbs, at 3:30 o'clock A. M., and attacked Graham's battery and some of Dearing's cavalry below our line on the river road, by 8 A. M. on the 15th of June, 1864, and advanced in a body upon our left, from No. 1 to No. 5 where the worst constructed line of the war made a sharp salient angle, leaving the most commanding ground outside of our line in front. The battle was pressed hard upon the left until about 1 P. M., without making an impression, but our whole f
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), James Louis Petigru, (search)
igh degree, involves and implies mental activity and diligent research. There must be preliminary preparation both of an academic and a professional nature. Assuming a fair degree of the first we may enlarge a little on the second. The great exponent and apostle of the law, Sir William Blackstone, has to be studied. The principles which he discusses and elaborates have to be read, digested, and stored away in the mind. The student has to familiarize himself with Story and Adam's Equity, Smith's Mercantile Law, or some other work of like nature, has to be mastered. The statute law of the State has to be learned, works of pleading and practice must be perused and made part of the mental equipment. This preparation and these books necessitate the exercise of the intellectual faculties—their expansion and development. Practice of the profession calls for more. Cases have to be studied. Principles of the law as they have been expounded and adjudicated in the courts, have to be le
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.16 (search)
s encountered a net work of abatis—hundred of tree laps with the ends of limbs pointed and sharpened. Here many a brave boy met his fate without flinching. The right under Huger, the centre under Longstreet and D. H. Hill, and the left under G. W. Smith, were pressing steadily forward. A Northern writer, from this point of view, describes the scene thus: Our shot tore their ranks wide open, and shattered them asunder in a manner frightful to witness, but they closed up and came on as s, yet the assault on the enemy's left flank failed, because, by reason of the swollen condition of the water, General Huger was unable to move his division to the proper place. At the same time the difficulties that impeded the advance of General G. W. Smith, was scarcely less formidable, and he failed to break the enemy's right flank, though desperate and bloody efforts were made. According to the plan of attack, Generals D. H. Hill and Longstreet assailed the centre of the enemy's line of e
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.23 (search)
64 is correct. Otherwise his description from the Federal standpoint is in accord with my recollection. As this was a bloody and remarkable battle, and no account of it has been written for several years, you will, I hope, allow me to give the Confederate version of the battle. Even the Federal official reports have been strangely reticent concering the operations of the 18th of June, 1864, and of the two days preceding that day. General Grant, in his report, says that he ordered General G. W. Smith to advance, and for three days finding no progress had been made, he went himself to the front. This is all he says; General B. F. Butler, who had been bottled up, as Grant said, across the Appomattox, a stone's throw from a part of this battlefield, and who crossed it to see Grant, retaliated the bottling up assertion by alleging that Grant was drunk on this occasion. Some time ago a new element to me, was introduced into our Confederate version, and I wrote to General Hagood the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.37 (search)
or Wise called out the troops, of the State, and ordered the Corps of Cadets to be held ready for immediate service. General Smith, superintendent of the corps, promptly obeyed the orders. Major Jackson reported at the guard-room ready for the field. General Smith, after giving attention to some matters requiring it, said: Major Jackson, you will remain as you are till further orders. At that moment Major Jackson was seated upon a campstool in the guard-room with his sabre across his knees. Next morning at reveille General Smith repaired to the guardroom and found Jackson sitting on the camp-stool and said: Why, Major, why are you here? Because you ordered me to remain here as I was last night, and I have done so. JacksonMathematics. There was a desire on the part of the cadets that he should command the corps in the impending battle. General Smith meant he should remain as Professor of Mathematics by remain as you are. Next year he went off to the great war b
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
prisoners at, 143. Sansom, Miss, Emma, 45. Saunders, General J. C. C., 84. Schimmelfinnig, General, Alex., 8. Semmes, Hon. T. J., Reminiscences of, 317. Semple, Major H. C., 321. Seven Days Battles, 161. Seven Pines, Battle of, 157, 158, 208, 215. Sharpsburg, Battle of, 95, 106, 164. Shenandoah, Career and Officers of, 116. Shepherdstown, Battle of, 254. Signal Corps, C. S. A., The, 130. Slaves, Proclamation freeing them, 378. Slidell, Hon., John, 191. Smith, General G. W., 158, 222. Smith, General W. F., 5, 13. Soldiers of 200 years, The greatest, 92 Southanna Bridge, Battle of, 337. South Carolina, Operations in, 1863-4, 7. South, Life in the, before 1861, 324. South Mountain Gap, Battle of, 162. South, Righteous Cause of the, 357. Spinola Family, The. 188. Spotsylvania C. H., Battle of, 170, 261, 340. Sprunt, Hon., James, 378. Starke, Colonel A. W, 3, 4 Stedman, Charles M., 334. Stewart, Colonel W. H., 77, 285. Stiles,