Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for George Smith or search for George Smith in all documents.

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--Lieutenant Commanding C. H. Green, contusion of leg; Acting Ensign Maurice McEntree, contusion of the thigh; Acting Master Henry R. Billings, contusion of face, all from splinters, slight; James McIntosh, Coxswain, incised wound of scalp, not severe; John Govard, seaman, lacerated wound of forehead, quite severe; Charles Howard, seaman, contusion of sacrum, slight; William H. Nice, Boatswain's Mate, severe contusion of right eye; Andrew Crough, Quartermaster, contusion of scalp, slight; George Smith, ship's corporal, wound of upper third left arm, quite severe; John Robinson, quartermaster, contusion of left foot, slight. Killed, one; wounded, ten. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Edward R. Dodge, Assistant Surgeon U. S. Navy. Lieut. Com. C. H. Green, Commanding U. S. Octorara. Report of casualties on the U. S. S. Kennebec. U. S. S. Kennebec, Mobile Bay, Aug. 6, 1864. sir: I respectfully report the following casualties in action yesterday mornin
the rebel guns. Firing was continued, and about three o'clock a shell from the enemy entered the boiler of the boat, and a great explosion followed. Resistance could no longer be continued, as the boat was now a mere wreck. She then surrendered, and all on board of her were prisoners. Some, to make their escape from captivity, jumped overboard, and, no doubt, the most of those who were not recaptured, sealed their fate with a watery grave. Captain Lee, a Pamunky Indian pilot, and George Smith, a volunteer pilot, with two other men, are the only ones out of the whole party, which in the aggregate amounted to nearly one hundred and fifty, that escaped, except two others that were sent out the night before in a small boat to report the perilous situation of the force under Captain Lee. These men were picked up near the mouth of the James River, and taken on board the flag-ship of the navy that is stationed there. Their mission was to go up the Nansemond River to report to Gener