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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 112 2 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 70 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 52 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 42 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 22 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 20 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 14 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Gerrit Smith or search for Gerrit Smith in all documents.

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t undignified congregation of petty legislators, introduced a bill the other day to suppress those slaveholders' rebellion, containing a provision for the abolition of slavery. Others have uttered sentiments quite as atrocious in relation to the subject. This feeling is exhibiting itself, too, with renewed energy among the old abolition agitators, who but a few years since clamored loudly for disunion, pronouncing the Federal Constitution a league with hell and a covenant with death. Gerrit Smith, the patriarch of them all, says that both abolitionists and anti-abolitionists should petition the executive to proclaim the liberty of the slaves. Wendell Phillips is anxious to proclaim Mr. Lincoln the liberator of four millions of bondsmen, and Boutwell, once governor of the State of Massachusetts, thinks that the present war will not terminate until the Lincoln Government asserts in some way the doctrine that liberty is not the property of any race; that it is not the exclusive righ