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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 112 2 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 70 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 52 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 42 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 22 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 20 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 14 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for Gerrit Smith or search for Gerrit Smith in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
the Emancipator—a Ante, 2.342, 343, 351. transfer that was certainly very dishonorable, and wholly unworthy of the character of those who participated in it. Gerrit Smith says the transfer of the Emancipator was a great outrage—told Burleigh so—not publicly (Ms. Feb. 10, 1841, J. S. Gibbons to W. L. G.). The transfer of the Emancipator was indefensible (Ms. Nov. 26, 1870, Gerrit Smith to W. L. G.). Yet I doubt not that the mission of J. A. C. will do much for our persecuted Collins. enterprise. For what you have done to aid him, we all feel under the deepest obligations. May Heaven reward you a hundred-fold! Fear not that truth shall not triumph d for the year 1841. Dr. Channing, in his work on West India Emancipation, sorrowfully admitted the Lib. 11.6. pro-slavery character of American religion; and Gerrit Smith, speaking to this text, said: I do not hesitate to make the remark, infidel though it may seem in the eyes of many, that were all the religion of this land—th
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 2: the Irish address.—1842. (search)
er; but, on his invitation, I spent the evening with him and James C. Jackson (whose headquarters are now in Utica), and we had a talk on a great variety of topics, not excepting third-partyism. I spoke very plainly on the last topic, and made them both rather uneasy; for poor James evidently felt that he stood on a sandy foundation. In company with Luther Myrick, J. C. Jackson founded at Cazenovia, N. Y., in September, 1841, a third-party paper called the Madison County Abolitionist. Gerrit Smith had invited him to edit it, and contributed to his support (Lib. 11: 159; Mss. Sept. 29, 1841, J. S. Gibbons to W. L. G., and Oct. 9, 1841, J. C. Jackson to Abby Kelley). Just before Mr. Garrison's arrival, Jackson had publicly advertised a Liberty Party lecturing partnership with W. L. Chaplin, on the independent contract system— i. e., not as agents for any society or organization, and neither salaried nor living off the field; but on special terms for their services in every instance.
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 3: the covenant with death.1843. (search)
ll for the admission of Louisiana, Jan. 14, 1811: I am compelled to declare it as my deliberate opinion that, if this bill passes, the bonds of this Union are virtually dissolved; that the States which compose it are free from their moral obligations, and that, as it will be the right of all, so it will be the duty of some, to prepare definitely for a separation—amicably if they can, violently if they must ( Life of Josiah Quincy, p. 206). So Judge Jay, about to sail for Europe, wrote to Gerrit Smith: Rather than be in union with Texas, let the confederation be shivered. My voice, my efforts will be for dissolution, if Texas be annexed. Lib. 13.191; of. Lib. 15; 58, [62]. We go one step further, commented Mr. Garrison, dissolution now, Texas out of the question. The sequel will show which of these classes of disunionists had root, and which would Lib. 15.82. wither away before the glare of the Slave Power. But it may be noticed here that the group of anti-slavery Whigs led by Ada
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 4: no union with slaveholders!1844. (search)
s are reduced to you will see by Earle's Thomas Earle. articles in the Standard, The no-voting theory, signed E., and Gerrit Smith's tract, which you will find at Lib. 14: 137, 143, 150, 154, 159. length in both Liberator and Standard. The adherenthe U. S. Constitution is, and was intended to be, by those who originally framed and adopted it, [anti-slavery]! Even Gerrit Smith has stultified himself so far as to have written a long letter to John G. Whittier, maintaining the same absurd doctriling the American A. S. Society a Non-Resistance Society, because it will not support a pro-slavery Constitution! See Gerrit Smith's letter in Lib. 14.137. Edmund Jackson, a brother of Francis, gave, in the Liberator, his weighty assent to the doctrom the side of the Liberty Party, not without a manly disgust at the casuistry relied upon by his opponents, who (like Gerrit Smith) in one breath maintained that slavery had Lib. 14.137, 143. no lodgment in the Constitution, and proposed to amend i
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 6: third mission to England.—1846. (search)
ly held its own, and looked forward to certain death for the party at large if the stationary stage were not quickly escaped—Joshua Leavitt himself Lib. 16.57. being present, and discounting the impending catastrophe by denying that the party and the ballot-box were the sole Cf. ante, 2.310. means of abolishing slavery. Bailey gave a discouraging account of the Ohio section, and predicted that all would be over with it if it manifested no strength in the coming gubernatorial election. Gerrit Smith lamented in New Lib. 16.77. York a falling away on all sides, and W. L. Chaplin and J. C. Jackson confirmed his statements. Only one dollar was raised to ten formerly. Edmund Quincy judged it at Lib. 16.174, 175. this time to be on its last legs; and the fall elections showed that it could send only five Representatives out of Lib. 16.194. 232 to the Massachusetts lower House, polling a total vote of about 10,000. In New York it cast but 12,000 votes, Lib. 17.11. against 16,000 in
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 7: first Western tour.—1847. (search)
ague at Macedon Lock, N. Y., under the auspices of J. G. Birney, Gerrit Smith, William Lib. 17.106. Goodell, Beriah Green, William L. Chaplin(no human government heresy), distribution of the public lands. Gerrit Smith was Lib. 17.106, 113. nominated for the Presidency. Our old f 1846. Hampshire, on J. P. Hale's election. On Aug. 6, 1846, Gerrit Smith wrote: Since the Liberty Party has subscribed to the doctrine of7: 106,117): When I saw such men as Birney and Goodell, claiming Gerrit Smith as a coadjutor, mixing up with the simple principles of the Libeation of the convention at Buffalo. It was, however, a strong Gerrit Smith delegation which Lib. 17.178. H. C. Wright accompanied on the bending that the Liberty Party was not a permanent party, whereas Gerrit Smith and the Liberty Leaguers insisted that it was or should be, and aking office. Leavitt was likewise in opposition to Goodell and Gerrit Smith and Lib. 17.186; 18.14. Lysander Spooner on the question of the
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 8: the Anti-Sabbath Convention.—1848. (search)
on, Lewis Tappan, and others, I had no sympathy. Mr. Leavitt's prominent part in the nominating of Van Buren was very offensive to me (Ms. November 26, 1870, Gerrit Smith to W. L. G.). The Free Soil Party exists, wrote Quincy, Lib. 18.146. not because, but in spite of the Liberty Party. Van Buren had already come out againstlumbia); and that Congress has no Constitutional power to meddle with it in the several States—(another repudiation of Spooner's, Goodell's, Lysander Spooner. and Smith's dogma on that point). Wm. Goodell. Gerrit Smith. Our Disunion ground is invulnerable, and to it all parties at the North must come ere long. The temptationGerrit Smith. Our Disunion ground is invulnerable, and to it all parties at the North must come ere long. The temptation to vote, however, at the coming election, will be so great that I fear a considerable number of Disunionists, and even of professed non-resistants, will fall into the snare, and try to persuade themselves that, for this once, they may innocently, and even laudably, bow down in the house of Rimmon. Calm yet earnest appeals must b
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 11: George Thompson, M. P.—1851. (search)
t Syracuse, five slaves appeared with him upon the platform. At Peterboroa, Gerrit Smith Lib. 21.43, 46, 47, 49, 50. gave him the warmest welcome, which in an adverof that the abolitionists were a law-abiding and not a mob-producing class. Gerrit Smith gave greeting —Joy, then, to you, William Lloyd Garrison; to you, George Thont search after materials to make out a case of constructive treason against Gerrit Smith, Charles A. Wheaton, Samuel J. May, and five others, and to find grounds forss Cf. Lib. 21.198. of the Law. It is now no longer probable that either Gerrit Smith, Charles A. Wheaton, or myself, will be indicted. They were, however (Libback from this position, it will be all the easier to continue the rout. Gerrit Smith to W. L. Garrison. Peterboroa, December 31, 1851. Ms. On my return toe of Liberty will come from them. The volume of Selections referred to by Mr. Smith was a duodecimo of somewhat more than four hundred pages, consisting of extra
son presided. Frederick Douglass, on motion of Lewis Tappan, was made one of the secretaries. Charles Francis Adams, Gerrit Smith, F. J. Le Moyne, and Joshua R. Giddings took a leading part. The platform declared for no more slave States, no slavecheap postage and river-and-harbor improvements— or no immediate relation, like the Homestead Law, which Lib. 22.137. Gerrit Smith called the sister of abolition. John P. Hale was renominated for President, and withdrew his Lib. 22.151. declinaturaggressive speech in the Convention was made by Douglass, who was for exterminating slavery Lib. 22.134. everywhere. Gerrit Smith reported a minority platform declaring slavery to be incapable of legislation, and so whitewashing the pro-slavery Conshed at Seneca Falls, N. Y. But it was introduced by Elizabeth Smith Miller, the daughter of the great philanthropist, Gerrit Smith, in 1850 ( Hist. Of Woman Suffrage, 1: 127; and see also pp. 469, 844). Theodore is at home on his farm. T. D. Weld.
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 14: the Nebraska Bill.—1854. (search)
scence in the Compromise of 1850 (of which he had never spoken irreverently), and could declare: I have always heard, with equal pity and disgust, threats of disunion in the free States and similar threats in the slaveholding States. Well did Gerrit Smith write to Ms. July 18, 1854. Mr. Garrison: I have acquired no new hope of the peaceful termination of slavery by coming to Washington. I go home more discouraged than ever. Mr. Smith had been elected to Congress in the fall of 1852 (Lib. Mr. Smith had been elected to Congress in the fall of 1852 (Lib. 22: 163, [182]). He was now going home for good, having resigned on account of his health. Giddings, Chase, J. R. Giddings. S. P. Chase. etc. are full of hope, but I am yet to see that there is a North. Well did Lysander Spooner write to the editor Feb. 13, 1854; Lib. 24.30. of the Commonwealth, refusing to be a delegate to an Anti-Nebraska Bill Convention in Faneuil Hall: I trust you will allow me space to say, that I decline the Lib. 24.31. appointment; that I have never been a memb
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