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cords of the regiment, the reports of regimental and brigade commanders, the diaries of several members of the regiment, and several books already published covering the same events. Of these the diary of Colonel Clinton Beckwith, notes by Lieut. J. H. Smith, the chapters in the History of Otsego County, prepared by Colonel J. W. Cronkite, the letters of Chaplain John R. Adams and the diary of Lieutenant Woodcock have been especially useful. Col. Beckwith's diary is as it professes to be, the d. The compiler bespeaks for his work the same kindly regard that has been shown him by the Regimental Association, in welcoming him to its membership, and honoring him with this privilege of writing its history. The task assigned to Lieut. Jas. H. Smith of collecting photographs of the officers of the regiment, and of having half-tone reproductions made of such as could be secured, for use in this volume, he has found a very difficult undertaking. It will be remembered by our surviving c
Isaac O. Best, History of the 121st New York State Infantry, Chapter 5: the battle of Fredericksburg (search)
from command and General Hooker appointed in his stead. The Grand Division organization was abandoned and from that time the names of Generals Franklin and Sumner, no longer appear in connection with the Army of the Potomac. General Burnside quietly and patriotically resumed command of his old corps, and continued to do splendid service to the end of the war. The old corps formation was restored, and General Hooker did excellent work in restoring the efficiency and morale of the army. General Smith was transferred to the Ninth Corps, and General Sedgwick promoted to the command of the Sixth Corps. The letter by which President Lincoln transferred the command from Burnside is one of his remarkable literary productions. It is easy to read between the lines his deep anxiety, his anxious solicitude, his fatherly sentiments toward the officers of the army, and his keen appreciation of the abilities and weaknesses of the different commanders to whom he had to entrust the military aff
Isaac O. Best, History of the 121st New York State Infantry, Chapter 9: under Grant in the Wilderness (search)
The nearest of them were only about three or four yards away before they were seen by our men through the thick underbrush. Both squads halted when they discovered each other. Then the foremost of the Rebs deliberately dropped the butt of his gun to the ground and said, Surrender, Yanks! We promise to treat you well. There is no use of resisting for there is a full line of battle just back of us. The Second Sergeant of the company happened to be in the squad, but made no reply, also J. H. Smith then ranking as Fourth Sergeant who promptly said, Don't surrender, boys, and at once fired upon a Confederate who stood a little to the rear of their spokesman in a threatening attitude. This action resulted in the surrender of three of the Rebs who were taken to the rear by Frank Piper and another comrade. The others retreated. Before the attack was checked, however, the headquarters of General Sedgwick had been nearly reached. It is related that an officer rode excitedly to Gener
Isaac O. Best, History of the 121st New York State Infantry, Chapter 20: Appomattox and after (search)
f the day, Sunday, in the old armory, corner of Center and Grand streets. Beckwith says, On Monday, July 1st, we marched up Broadway, having with us the stands of Rebel colors we had captured at Rappahannock Station and Sailor's Creek. We received a great ovation. Arrangements had been made and permission obtained from Washington for the regiment to go to Little Falls to participate in the celebration of the Fourth of July. This home-coming reception is described as follows by Lieut. Jas. H. Smith: Most of the members of the regiment were in line, with their arms, and with the seven Confederate regimental flags which they had captured during the preceding three years, and which the War Department had granted them the unparalleled privilege of carrying as trophies of their valor, and their sacrifices, to this reception, given by the parents, wives, sisters, brothers and friends of this brave remnant of that noble band, nearly 1000 strong, which they had bidden goodbye, and
enbush, May 29 to July 9, 1864; J. W. Johnston, July 9 to November 18, 1864; J. H. Smith, April 29 to June 25, 1865. Company D Captains: J. D. Fish, August 23, Lieut. G. W. Quackenbush, 2746 S. Lincoln, Englewood, Denver, Colo. Lieut. James H. Smith, 3541 Cottage Grove Ave., Chicago, Ill. Non-commissioned officers an Myers, 86 John St., Little Falls, N. Y. A. T. Orvis, Cold Brook, N. Y. James H. Smith, Philadelphia, N. Y. James B. Schaffner, 213 Mohawk St., Herkimer, N. Y. so excellent that he was invited to sit on the board of examiners. Lieutenant James H. Smith was mustered out with the regiment at Hall's Hill and with his sons, preciation of the help and encouragement he has received so generously from Comrade Smith. Lieutenant Philip R. Woodcock was mustered out with the regiment at Halponsibility, he has requested Comrades Clinton Beckwith, C. J. Westcott and James H. Smith to act as a committee to examine and criticize the manuscript, ascertain th
Company C Captains: C. A. Moon, August 23, 1862 to January 17, 1863; C. J. Campbell, April 22, 1863 to March 20, 1864; J. W. Johnston, November 18, 1864 to June 25, 1865. First Lieutenants: T. S. Arnold, August 23 to August 30, 1862; A. Cameron, August 31 to November 9, 1862; F. Gorton, November 10, 1862 to January 28, 1863; C. M. Bradt, February 20 to April 9, 1863; H. Upton, May 3, 1863 to February 27, 1864; J. A. Heath, July 25, 1863 to December 12, 1864; F. W. Morse, December 23, 1864 to March 23, 1865; J. T. Morton, March 25 to April 6, 1865; Eli Oaks, April 30 to July 24, 1865. Second Lieutenants: A. Cameron, August 23 to August 31, 1862; C. M. Bradt, August 30, 1862 to February 20, 1863; S. Miller, February 20 to May 13, 1863; H. Upton, April 15 to March 3, 1863; G. W. Quackenbush, May 29 to July 9, 1864; J. W. Johnston, July 9 to November 18, 1864; J. H. Smith, April 29 to June 25, 1865.
Isaac O. Best, History of the 121st New York State Infantry, Non-commissioned officers and privates (search)
d Ward, R. F. D. No. 3, Oneonta, N. Y. Damon 0. Yates, R. F. D. No. 33, South Dayton, N. Y. W. W. Young, B. F. D. No. 1, Ilion, N. Y. Thomas H. Yocmans, Soldiers' Home, Bath, N. Y. Company C 0. B. Austin, Norwood, N. Y. M. H. Doland, Milburn, N. J. William Joyce, County Hospital, Astoria, Ore. Timothy Kavenaugh, Middleville, N. Y. Edward Mabey, R. F. D. No. 1, Johnstown, N. Y. William Myers, 86 John St., Little Falls, N. Y. A. T. Orvis, Cold Brook, N. Y. James H. Smith, Philadelphia, N. Y. James B. Schaffner, 213 Mohawk St., Herkimer, N. Y. Thomas Topper, Avonlea, Saskatchewan, Canada. Company D Fred Bryce, Ilion, N. Y. H. W. Cadwell, Jordanville, N. Y. William Dubois, Atwood, N. Y. M. D. Elwood, 1109 City St., Utica, N. Y. A. A. Gilespie, Duke Center, Penn. George H. Gilbert, Reed City, Mich. Levi Helmer, Dodgeville, N. Y. J. W. Hartley, Waterville, N. Y. J. H. Leonardson, R. F. D. No 7, Canastota, N Y. Charles Rice, 36 W