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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 218 12 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 170 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 120 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 115 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 110 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 108 12 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 106 10 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 81 5 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 65 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 53 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Kirby Smith or search for Kirby Smith in all documents.

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ment Indiana volunteers, taken prisoners by Kirby Smith, August thirtieth, 1862, at Richmond, Ky.: ports and narratives. Official report of Kirby Smith. headquarters army of Kentucky, Richmong army of heroes under the command of Major-Gen. Kirby Smith. His advance has been announced for successful affairs on his march from the Gap, Gen. Smith arrived at Richmond (twenty-five miles from e large Federal force of killed and wounded, Gen. Smith took about five thousand prisoners, most of sing them; and though but a small portion of Gen. Smith's force was engaged, it was mere child's plaently formidable army, and on Monday, when General Smith's approach was announced, confident predictucky from oppression. On Monday morning, Gen. Smith's advance — Churchill's division — entered ahe early part of the day, in time to receive Gen. Smith, (who arrived about eleven o'clock) with sucespectfully refer you to the reply of Brigadier-General Smith, commanding forces at Vicksburgh, her[1 more...]<
t. J. Holton, company K; Capt. Wingett, company G, badly; Lieut. Mount, company G. The rebels refusing to give any information in regard to the killed and wounded, it is impossible for me to furnish a correct list of the same at present. Respectfully your obedient servant, Harman J. Korff, Lieut.-Colonel U. S. Volunteers, Commanding Sixty-ninth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry. List of officers and men of company A, Sixty-ninth regiment Indiana volunteers, taken prisoners by Kirby Smith, August thirtieth, 1862, at Richmond, Ky.: Capt. John H. Finley, First Lieut. M. M. Lacy, Second Lieut. George C. Garretson, First Sergt. Jos. Messick, Israel Lamm, Charles Keys, Solomon Bates, Thomas Ennis, Corporal David Zeck, Wm. H. Thomas, Thomas Batliff, Corp. Samuel Little, Owen Phillips, John Riprogle, Musician Upton Talhelm, Jacob Schulz, Corporal Joseph Dorep, Henry B. Smith, Alnut A. Frulghum, Corporal George Dunlap, Lafayette Larsh, Rufus Newman, John C. Kitselman, Cornel
bel reports and narratives. Official report of Kirby Smith. headquarters army of Kentucky, Richmond, Kyquering army of heroes under the command of Major-Gen. Kirby Smith. His advance has been announced for severaand successful affairs on his march from the Gap, Gen. Smith arrived at Richmond (twenty-five miles from Lexines the large Federal force of killed and wounded, Gen. Smith took about five thousand prisoners, most of whom opposing them; and though but a small portion of Gen. Smith's force was engaged, it was mere child's play for apparently formidable army, and on Monday, when General Smith's approach was announced, confident predictions n Kentucky from oppression. On Monday morning, Gen. Smith's advance — Churchill's division — entered and oc in the early part of the day, in time to receive Gen. Smith, (who arrived about eleven o'clock) with such dem of magnanimity presented by the proclamation of General Smith, (which we publish in another column,) and respo
ksburgh, Miss., May 18, 1862. To S. Phillips Lee, Commanding Advance Naval Division: sir: As your communication of this date is addressed To the authorities of Vicksburgh, and that you may have a full reply to said communication, I have to state that Mississippians don't know and refuse to learn how to surrender to an enemy. If Commodore Farragut or Brig.-Gen. Butler can teach them, let them come and try. As to the defences of Vicksburgh, I respectfully refer you to the reply of Brigadier-General Smith, commanding forces at Vicksburgh, herewith enclosed. Respectfully, James L. Autry, Military Governor and Commandant Post. headquarters defences Vicksburgh, Miss., May 18, 1862. S. Phillips Lee, U. S.N., Commanding Advance Naval Division: sir: Your communication of this date, addressed To the authorities of Vicksburgh, demanding the surrender of the city and its defences, has been received. In regard to the surrender of the defences, I have to reply that having been ordered
h, and attack the enemy the next morning. Withers's division had gone the day before to support Smith. Hearing, on the night of the seventh, that the force in front of Smith had rapidly retreated, Smith had rapidly retreated, I moved early next morning, to be present at the operations of Polk's command. The two armies were formed confronting each other, on opposite sides of the town of Perryville. After consulting theht, I .withdrew my force early the next morning to Harrodsburgh, and thence to this point. Major-Gen. Smith arrived at Harrodsburgh with most of his force and Withers's division the next day, tenth, e enemy. Gen. Withers's division was not in the fight, being in our rear, between us and Gen. Kirby Smith. We took in this (Wednesday's) fight about five hundred prisoners. Hardee's command and thnight, and our forces fell back to this place. No fight to-day, but will come off to-morrow. Gen. Smith has this evening formed a junction with Bragg's army; the enemy within eight miles of us. Near
r guns were spiked, and the carriages cut down. The whole surface of the encampments was strewn with flour, meal, beans, rice, corn, and oats. They have lived fast and well, and .cost them nothing but so much trash as you or I would not stop to pick up. The great defect of the rebel army organization has been its commissary department. They have subsisted by pillage and robbery, as their forced circulation of the issues of rotten shinplasters, banks and firms can be characterized by no milder terms. The capture of the Gap will have important results on the future operations of the war, as it can safely be made the base for future operations against the further south rebels. The situation here may thus be summed up: the rebels under Gens. Smith, Stevenson, and Barton, to the number of thirteen thousand, have retreated to Binghamton, Virginia; Gen. Morgan, with his main column, occupies Cumberland Gap; Gen. Carter, with his force, occupies Tazewell. Ben. --Cincinnati Commercial.