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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 218 12 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 170 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 120 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 115 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 110 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 108 12 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 106 10 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 81 5 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 65 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 53 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. J. J. Dickison, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.2, Florida (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Kirby Smith or search for Kirby Smith in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 5 document sections:

of such men as Captain Bradford of Florida; Lieutenant Nelms of Georgia; Sergeant Routh of Tallahassee; Private Tillinghast, etc., would not be compensated for, in my opinion, by the total annihilation of Billy Wilson and his whole band of thieves and cut-throats. The Florida regiment had only 100 men in the expedition, out of 1,060, and lost 6 killed, 8 wounded, and 12 prisoners, as follows: Killed: Captain Bradford, Sergeant Routh, Privates Tillinghast, Hale, Thompson of Apalachicola, and Smith. Wounded: Corporal Lanier, Privates Echols, McCorkle, Sims, William Denham, Hicks, Sharrit and O'Neal (Peter, of Pensacola). These are doing well and will recover. Prisoners: Hale and Bond, Company A; Mahoney and Nichols, Company B; Bev. Parker and Finley, Company E; Holliman, Godlie, John Jarvis, M. Mosely, and Batterson, of Company F; also Lieutenant Farley, Company E. I deeply regret that such men as Lieutenants Farley, Parker and Finley should have fallen into the enemy's hands. Howe
e country lying between that point and Pensacola from raiding expeditions. Independent companies under Captains Thigpen, Smith, Blocker, Milton, with Partridge's, Leigh's, Smith's, Turner's and Pickett's independent cavalry, assisted by several othSmith's, Turner's and Pickett's independent cavalry, assisted by several other independent companies, were employed for the protection of other important points lying on the west side of the Suwannee river. The counties lying between and beyond these rivers possessed great productive capacity, and the character of their s supporting distance of Chattanooga. On their arrival they did not long remain inactive, being soon ordered to join Gen. Kirby Smith, and doing most effective service in their first and most important fight at Richmond, Ky. On this memorable occasio the Marion light artillery was the only corps from Florida present, and was placed in a most conspicuous position. Gen. Kirby Smith briefly addressed them just as the fight commenced, and in his own eloquent manner appealed to the corps to maintai
the invasion and the atrocities that were perpetrated. On being advised of the Federal movement threatening Marianna and Tallahassee, General Jackson had ordered Brigadier-General Miller to assume command of subdis-tricts, Colonels Turney and Smith being sick; and ordered all the troops in Colonel Smith's district and four companies of Fifth Florida cavalry, with Lieutenant-Colonel Scott, from Colonel Turney's district, to report to General Miller. Jackson also reported: I think there is Colonel Smith's district and four companies of Fifth Florida cavalry, with Lieutenant-Colonel Scott, from Colonel Turney's district, to report to General Miller. Jackson also reported: I think there is great danger of an attack from the west coast, of which this present raid is the precursor. My force is entirely inadequate to meet these different attacks; too small when concentrated, it is indeed too weak when divided. On the 23d of October, 1864, Captain Dickinson received a dispatch from Lieutenant Haynes of the Fifth battalion of cavalry, on the outposts near Green Cove Springs, that the enemy in considerable force had been met and driven back by his command about 3 miles. He immediat
's ferry on the Tennessee river were engaged with the enemy on the opposite side of the river. The Seventh, like the Sixth, was subsequently employed in skirmishing and picket duty at Loudon and Knoxville, and in the Kentucky campaign under Gen. Kirby Smith. After the retreat they remained at Cumberland Gap until December. Colonel Perry resigning command, Lieutenant-Colonel Bullock was promoted to colonel, Major Ingram to lieutenant-colonel and Capt. N. S. Blount, major. The regiment at Knoxttery, organized in Marion county as the Marion light artillery. This battery had done brilliant and effective service at the battle of Richmond, Ky., under the command of Capt. J. M. Martin. It was the only Florida battery ordered to join Gen. Kirby Smith and assigned to duty in the army of Tennessee. Colonel Maxwell, of the First cavalry, reported his loss on the 19th at 2 killed and 15 wounded and 1 missing. Among the killed was Lieut. Richard F. Hart, Company E, a most excellent officer
he was a presidential elector on the Whig ticket, and in 1853 was appointed judge of the west circuit of Florida. When the war began he sided with the Confederate cause, and in 1861 he was made judge of the Confederate court. In March 1862 he resigned this post of honor and entered the army as a private; was soon promoted to a captaincy, and on April 14, 1862, was commissioned as colonel of the Sixth Florida regiment. He was on duty in east Tennessee in Davis' brigade, Heth's division, Kirby Smith's department; took part in the Kentucky campaign and after the return to Knoxville served as president of the court-martial for the department until ordered to Tullahoma. He commanded his regiment in the battle of Chickamauga with distinction. On November 16, 1863, he was commissioned brigadier-general and assigned to command of the Florida infantry in the army of Tennessee, united in a brigade of Bate's division, Hardee's corps. He commanded this gallant brigade at Missionary Ridge, a