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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 218 12 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 170 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 120 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 115 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 110 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 108 12 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 106 10 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 81 5 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 65 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 53 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Kirby Smith or search for Kirby Smith in all documents.

Your search returned 24 results in 8 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences. (search)
bities engendered by it are fast being buried in the grave of Oblivion — where is the gray-headed Confederate whose eve does not kindle at the remembrance of those four heroic years? Does he not feel like re-echoing the glowing words which the great dramatist puts in the mouth of Henry the Fifth the night before Agincourt, This story shall the goodman teach his son.— The that shall live this day, and see old age, Will yearly on the vigil feast his neighbors, And say, To-morrow is Saint Crispin; Then will he strip his sleeve and show his scars, And say, These wounds I had on Crispin's day. And does not his heart burn while he tells with pride of the days when with unfaltering steps, though weary and hungry, but with the light of battle in his eye, he followed in the lead of those illustrious captains and masters of war, A. P. Hill, Jackson, Hampton, Stuart, Mosby, Johnston, Kirby Smith and a host of other gallant spirits—and last, though not least, of Robert Edward
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Dedication of a bronze tablet in honor of Botetourt Battery (search)
of much of its tedium. Never was an army in such glorious spirits! Alas! the army's spirits were short-lived. The army's retreat from Kentucky was ordered. Letters and journals break into hot protest. Small use in that. Orders are orders—and the army turned its face towards Tennessee. On the fourth of October we left Frankfort. When we had crossed the river the bridge was fired. We marched all night. On reaching Harrodsburg we were immediately thrown into position. Saw all of Kirby Smith's corps go into line of battle—a very pretty sight. The rain drenched us. Camped in a barn. Expected to meet the enemy next day, but did not as he was trying to flank us. Fell back and again formed line of battle. A long march. Had a goose stew for supper, and bread made up with beer. Three days later camped at Reed's on the Holstein. It snowed on us all day. Bitter hard marching. . . . At Knoxville we had orders for middle Tennessee. Marched through Kingston and forded the Clinch.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), An incomplete roster of the Botetourt Battery. (search)
aker's Creek. Druming J. Fagan, J. S. Fink, G. Fink, J. Finney, N. Finney, W. Fulniher, R. Givens, J. Haney, O. Hollins, J. Hooke, G. Houts, J. Hunter, A. Irvin, J. Kenell, R. Lemon, P. Linkenhoger, G. Lypes, D. Killed at Baker's Creek. Lypes, J. Livingston, A. B. Livingston, C. McCartney, W. Markham, J. Matthews, James. Dead. Miller, M. S. Mitchell, J. Moreley, G. R. Moeleck, J. Murset, J. Newall, R. Nofsinger, C. New, J. N. Nowell, G. Obenchain, F. Obenchain, J. Killed. Painter, F. Plecker, Adam H., gunner. Rady, P. Ribble, L. Richardson, D. Richardson, M. Robertson, P. Robertson, S. Shank,—— Smith, J. J., gunner. Stennet, H. Stennet, R. Thomas, W. Walkup, A. Ware, G. Watson,—— White, C., color-bearer. White, G. Woltze, F. Zimmerman, J. A. H. Plecker includes in his list, Wm. Mayo and Albert Anderson, negro se
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The career of General Jackson (search)
m of his old cadet cap. as he almost fiercely replied: Sir, we will not be beaten back. We will give them the bayonet. Bee rushed to his own decimated ranks and rallied them by exclaiming: Look! there stands Jackson like a stone wall! Rally on the Virginians! Let us determine to die here, and we will conquer! Jackson not only stood the shock of the heavy attack made on him, but did give them the bayonet, checked the onward tide of McDowell's victory, and held his position until Kirby Smith and Early came up on the flank. Jeb Stuart made a successful cavalry charge, Johnston and Beauregard had time to hurry up other troops, and a great Confederate victory was snatched from impending disaster. The name which the gallant Bee, about to yield up his noble life, gave Jackson that day, clung to him ever afterwards, and he will be known in history not by the name Thomas Jonathan Jackson, which his parents gave him, but as Stonewall Jackson. And yet the name was a misnomer. Th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Eleventh Kentucky Cavalry, C. S. A. From the Lexington, Ky. Herald, April 21, 1907. (search)
tizens of the county, of Southern sentiment, had united in recommending him (Chenault) to General Kirby Smith as one of the most suitable men in Kentucky to recruit and organize a regiment of Kentuckde. It was the first regiment of Kentucky soldiers mustered into the service after Bragg and Kirby Smith advanced into Kentucky; and, properly speaking, it should have been designated the 1st Kentucday that it was mustered into the service (September 10, 1862), orders were received from General Kirby Smith, then at Lexington, for one of its companies to go on an expedition to Irvine and Estill ervice from Kentucky, left Richmond on October 18, 1862, and retreated with the forces of General Kirby Smith by way of the Big Hill route across the mountains of Tennessee, and so had no opportunity with bushwhackers, as well as other rough experiences by the way. The regiment remained with Smith until the latter part of November, when it joined Morgan's Brigade (to which it belonged) near L
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Roster of the companies. (search)
ight) on a side saddle, carrying his crutches. First lieutenant—James Levi Wheeler. He took an active part in recruiting the company and came within a few votes of being elected its captain, and was captain before the close of the war. General Kirby Smith placed him in command of Clark County, with orders to suppress bushwhacking, etc., and to disarm and parole the Home Guards. Died in Winchester, April 2, 1894. Second lieutenants—Thomas Birch, died February 6, 1863, near Monticello, Kyand enlisted men. Company H. Company H was made up of men from Madison, Montgomery and Estill Counties, and perhaps had scattered members from other counties. It was in service under General Humphry Marshal for a year before Bragg's and Kirby Smith's invasion of Kentucky, about which time the term of the men's enlistment with Marshal expired, and they re-enlisted in Chenault's Regiment. There were also some new recruits in the company. There is only one known roll of it in existence (s
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.65 (search)
t you will kindly, in defence of the honor of President Jefferson Davis, General Kirby Smith, and my own self, give my explanations the widest publicity. You will oinion, I repaired to Shreveport in .the winter of 1865, and suggested to General Kirby Smith the advisability of granting me a six months leave of absence for the pue, and the question was fully discussed in all its bearings between him, General Kirby Smith, and myself. It is true that as to the intrinsic nature and merits of tct I could only repeat what others had said, yet both Governor Allen and General Kirby Smith concurred in the opinion that my acquaintance with the Duke de Morny wasy decided on. In order to give more weight to my presence abroad I asked General Kirby Smith to allow my chief-of-staff, Major T. C. Moncure, to accompany me; and Gonberger, should be the bearer. It lay within the sphere of authority of General Kirby Smith to grant Major Moncure and myself a leave of absence of six months. Neit
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.66 (search)
ied since the war. Selix, Tom, killed at Stevensburg in 1863. Smith, Golden H., died since the war. Smith, Seldon, living in BaltimoSmith, Seldon, living in Baltimore. Smith, Horace, living near Rectortown, Va. Smith, O'Connel, died during the war. Smith, Granville, killed on the cattle raid (FiSmith, Horace, living near Rectortown, Va. Smith, O'Connel, died during the war. Smith, Granville, killed on the cattle raid (First Lieut.). Smith, Sullivan (Second Lieut.), died since the war. Settle, Dr. T. L., Paris, Va. Smith, Thomas, lost sight of him. Smith, O'Connel, died during the war. Smith, Granville, killed on the cattle raid (First Lieut.). Smith, Sullivan (Second Lieut.), died since the war. Settle, Dr. T. L., Paris, Va. Smith, Thomas, lost sight of him. Taylor, Rufus, living near Rectortown, Va. Templeman, James, living, near Markham, Va. Triplett, Leonidas, lives at Mt. Jackson, Va. Smith, Granville, killed on the cattle raid (First Lieut.). Smith, Sullivan (Second Lieut.), died since the war. Settle, Dr. T. L., Paris, Va. Smith, Thomas, lost sight of him. Taylor, Rufus, living near Rectortown, Va. Templeman, James, living, near Markham, Va. Triplett, Leonidas, lives at Mt. Jackson, Va. Templeman, Robert, lives at Orleans, Va. Templeman, Dr. James, died in Baltimore since the war. Turner, Wm. F. (Capt.), died since thSmith, Sullivan (Second Lieut.), died since the war. Settle, Dr. T. L., Paris, Va. Smith, Thomas, lost sight of him. Taylor, Rufus, living near Rectortown, Va. Templeman, James, living, near Markham, Va. Triplett, Leonidas, lives at Mt. Jackson, Va. Templeman, Robert, lives at Orleans, Va. Templeman, Dr. James, died in Baltimore since the war. Turner, Wm. F. (Capt.), died since the war. Turner, Thomas, died in time of the war. Turner, Hezekiah, died since the war. Tibbetts, Albert, killed in the year 1864. Smith, Thomas, lost sight of him. Taylor, Rufus, living near Rectortown, Va. Templeman, James, living, near Markham, Va. Triplett, Leonidas, lives at Mt. Jackson, Va. Templeman, Robert, lives at Orleans, Va. Templeman, Dr. James, died in Baltimore since the war. Turner, Wm. F. (Capt.), died since the war. Turner, Thomas, died in time of the war. Turner, Hezekiah, died since the war. Tibbetts, Albert, killed in the year 1864. Utz, J. J., wounded at Orange Courthouse. Violet, Elizah, killed at Reams' Station in 1863. Wingfield, Wm., living. Wingfield, James