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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for M. H. Smith or search for M. H. Smith in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
our gallant and accomplished friend, General Lee (to whom we can never be grateful enough for the splendid service he has rendered us), and a spendid success for the Society. we acknowledge valued and appreciated courtesies on our recent tour from the following gentlemen: R. W. Fuller, General Ticket Agent Chesapeake and Ohio railway; W. M. S. Dunn, Superintendent Virginia Midland; Henry Fink, General Manager Norfolk and Western, East Tennessee and Georgia, and Selma, Rome and Dalton; M. H. Smith, General Manager Louisville and Nashville railroad; J. G. Schriever, Vice-President of the Morgan railroad; Colonel W. H. Harding, General Manager of the Galveston, Henderson and Houston Railroad; Colonel T. W. Peirce, Jr., Vice-President Southern Pacific; Colonel G. Jordan, Vice-President and General Manager Houston and Texas Central; H. M. Hoxie, Vice-President of the Missouri Pacific and Texas Pacific railroads; and Governor J. D. Porter, President Nashville, Chattanooga and St. Louis
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
our gallant and accomplished friend, General Lee (to whom we can never be grateful enough for the splendid service he has rendered us), and a spendid success for the Society. we acknowledge valued and appreciated courtesies on our recent tour from the following gentlemen: R. W. Fuller, General Ticket Agent Chesapeake and Ohio railway; W. M. S. Dunn, Superintendent Virginia Midland; Henry Fink, General Manager Norfolk and Western, East Tennessee and Georgia, and Selma, Rome and Dalton; M. H. Smith, General Manager Louisville and Nashville railroad; J. G. Schriever, Vice-President of the Morgan railroad; Colonel W. H. Harding, General Manager of the Galveston, Henderson and Houston Railroad; Colonel T. W. Peirce, Jr., Vice-President Southern Pacific; Colonel G. Jordan, Vice-President and General Manager Houston and Texas Central; H. M. Hoxie, Vice-President of the Missouri Pacific and Texas Pacific railroads; and Governor J. D. Porter, President Nashville, Chattanooga and St. Louis
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
r very special thanks to our old friend Colonel J. G. James, President of the Texas Military College, who rendered invaluable aid in arranging the programme of General Lee's tour through Texas, and conducted a very extensive correspondence to make it a success. Recently we have been brought under obligations to W. W. Peabody, General Superintendent of the Ohio and Mississippi, and renewed obligations to Colonel Hoxie, of the Missouri Pacific, and all the lines of the great Goul system; M. H. Smith, Vice President of the splendid Louisville and Nashville railway; and Henry Fink, Vice President and General Manager of the superb line from Memphis to Norfolk, for highly appreciated courtesies over their lines. And we desire gratefully to record that in travelling in February and March, from Richmond to New Orleans, Galveston, Houston, San Antonio, Austin, Waco, Corsicana, Dallas, Little Rock, Memphis, Nashville, Louisville and back to Richmond by the Chesapeake and Ohio railroad, an
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Confederate Artillery at Second Manassas and Sharpsburg. (search)
avalry under J. E. B. Stuart.—Pelham's Battery; Hart's (?)—(2). The following may have been present, but their assignments are not known to me: Leake's; Rogers' (Loudoun Artillery); Stribling's (Fauquier Artillery)—(3). There came up, after Second Manassas, from Richmond— Of the Reserve Artillery, five or six companies of Brown's First Virginia Regiment—Dance's (Powhatan Artillery); Hupp's (Salem Artillery); Macon's (Richmond Fayette Artillery); Watson's (Second Richmond Howitzers); Smith's (Third Richmond Howitzers); Coke's—(6?). Nelson's Battalion, Major William Nelson.—Ancell's Battery; Huckstep's; Kirkpatrick's; Milledge's—(4). Cults's Battalion, Lieutenant-Colonel Cutts.—Blackshear's Battery; Rose's; Lane's; Patterson's—(4). With D. H Hill. Jones's Battalion, Major H. P. Jones.—Wimbush's Battery; Turner's; Peyton's (Fry's); R. C. M. Page's—(4). D. H. Hill had also Carter's (King William Artillery); Bondurant's (Jeff. Davis A
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 48 (search)
Reminiscences of the siege of Vicksburg. Paper no. 2. By Major J. T. Hogane, of the Engineer Corps. The first man killed in Vicksburg was a Major of infantry belonging to General Vaughn's command. I had just reported to General Vaughn for duty as engineer officer of the line under command of Major-General Smith, and as a social recognition, he told me the news of the Major's death, how that he had crept between the opposing lines to relieve a wounded man, and there met his death. The angel of charity certainly had not far to come to meet him and to offer him the hand of fellowship. This fight was on the north side of Vicksburg, and outside the works proper. In company with a Lieutenant of engineers, I inspected the line of works to which I had been assigned, and was pleased with the strength of the natural position until I came to a depression in the line commanded by adjoining points. I asked the officer if he thought we could hold that position. Why not? he asked, and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Rev. J. G. Law. (search)
d and captured 18,000 of the enemy. March 17th.—Purdy. A bright and beautiful morning succeeded the dark and gloomy weather of the past few days. We left Bethel at noon, and arrived here at 3 o'clock. We are encamped in the woods, without tents, having left everything except our blankets and such provisions as we could carry in our haversacks. March 18th.—The weather is so pleasant that I lay under the shade of a large oak all the morning and read a worthless novel. This evening Colonel Smith secured comfortable quarters for us in the town of Purdy. We marched in about 3 o'clock, and after dress parade, repaired to our quarters in the old College building. We had just laid aside our arms when a courier came galloping up at full speed, and reported the enemy just outside the town. We were soon drawn up in line of battle, and a body of Lincoln cavalry appeared on the top of a neighboring hill, overlooking the river. They presented a very imposing spectacle with their gay un